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BBC environment 'Would you live in a straw house?'
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Tavascarow



Joined: 06 Aug 2006
Posts: 8407
Location: South Cornwall
PostPosted: Mon Feb 09, 15 11:36 am    Post subject: BBC environment 'Would you live in a straw house?'  Reply with quote    

'Would you live in a straw house?'

Tavascarow



Joined: 06 Aug 2006
Posts: 8407
Location: South Cornwall
PostPosted: Mon Feb 09, 15 11:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

More.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 35095
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon Feb 09, 15 1:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

ignoring the three little pigs themes in the msm if straw build is done well there seems no reason that it will not become a useful construction method

i recon alterations and retro fit might be a bit more complex than brick or timber and poor maintenance might be very bad quite quickly but apart from that they seem very sensible in the right setting.on a flood plain might be bad for example.

Falstaff



Joined: 27 May 2009
Posts: 1014

PostPosted: Mon Feb 09, 15 1:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Live in one? With the 90% fuel cost savings, No problem at all. Only too happy to !




Take out a mortgage on one or buy one at all ? ON YER BIKE !

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44229
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Mon Feb 09, 15 1:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Falstaff wrote:
Take out a mortgage on one or buy one at all ? ON YER BIKE !


Why?

One of the best houses I've ever been is a straw bale house, no idea why you'd be prejudiced against it.

Falstaff



Joined: 27 May 2009
Posts: 1014

PostPosted: Mon Feb 09, 15 2:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I'm not prejudiced against them - I'd live in one happily as I said.

I simply do not take the material seriously as an investment proposition in the long term.

But please - be my guest !

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44229
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Mon Feb 09, 15 2:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Falstaff wrote:
I simply do not take the material seriously as an investment proposition in the long term.


The brick built farmhouse we replaced (1921) was rotten, the real extent of the rot only apparent at demolition, our friend Richard did it, he just pushed it over with his forklift.

My friend Nick (owner/designer/builder of straw bale house) is a pretty techy guy, I would imagine that he made sure the thing would last as least as long asa normal house.

One of the options we looked at was rammed earth, if it had made sense (for the house we wanted and the soil we have) we'd have gone for it.

In short it's not about the materials, it's about design and construction, quality of both is what determines longevity...

Falstaff



Joined: 27 May 2009
Posts: 1014

PostPosted: Mon Feb 09, 15 2:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

tahir wrote:
Falstaff wrote:
I simply do not take the material seriously as an investment proposition in the long term.



............ a pretty techy guy, I would imagine that he made sure .......


..........In short it's not about the materials, it's about design and construction,..............


You're entitled to your opinion of course and I presume you will be investing in one yourself ?


earthyvirgo



Joined: 24 Aug 2007
Posts: 7972
Location: creating prints in the loft, Gerlan
PostPosted: Mon Feb 09, 15 2:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

tahir wrote:
Falstaff wrote:
I simply do not take the material seriously as an investment proposition in the long term.


The brick built farmhouse we replaced (1921) was rotten, the real extent of the rot only apparent at demolition, our friend Richard did it, he just pushed it over with his forklift.

My friend Nick (owner/designer/builder of straw bale house) is a pretty techy guy, I would imagine that he made sure the thing would last as least as long asa normal house.

One of the options we looked at was rammed earth, if it had made sense (for the house we wanted and the soil we have) we'd have gone for it.

In short it's not about the materials, it's about design and construction, quality of both is what determines longevity...


Strawbale has a much longer lifespan - at least 100 yrs.
A Baratt box has a lifetime of approx. 25.

EV

Last edited by earthyvirgo on Mon Feb 09, 15 2:26 pm; edited 1 time in total

vegplot



Joined: 19 Apr 2007
Posts: 21298
Location: Ynys Môn
PostPosted: Mon Feb 09, 15 2:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Falstaff wrote:
I'm not prejudiced against them - I'd live in one happily as I said.

I simply do not take the material seriously as an investment proposition in the long term.

But please - be my guest !


It'll last much longer than you or I. The oldest straw bale houses in Europe was built in 1921 and we now have a much greater understanding of materials behaviour.

It's land that's the investment not the house that's built on it.

Last edited by vegplot on Mon Feb 09, 15 2:27 pm; edited 1 time in total

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44229
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Mon Feb 09, 15 2:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Falstaff wrote:
You're entitled to your opinion of course and I presume you will be investing in one yourself ?



No, I won't. I've not long ago built a timber frame one (basically I beams, warmcel and OSB with oak shakes as the cladding), a lot of people thought we should go more traditional (in constrution and looks) but we didn't, and we're not worried about it.

Like I say we looked at all sorts of methods/materials, I might have bee swayed by stabilised rammed earth but the rammed earth guy we were speaking to was very dogmatic in his approach so we fell out.

I can't see me ever moving now, but if we were in the market and a decent strawbale house came up we'd look at it, maybe even buy it

vegplot



Joined: 19 Apr 2007
Posts: 21298
Location: Ynys Môn
PostPosted: Mon Feb 09, 15 2:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Falstaff wrote:
tahir wrote:
Falstaff wrote:
I simply do not take the material seriously as an investment proposition in the long term.



............ a pretty techy guy, I would imagine that he made sure .......


..........In short it's not about the materials, it's about design and construction,..............


You're entitled to your opinion of course and I presume you will be investing in one yourself ?




We are.

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44229
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Mon Feb 09, 15 2:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Looking back at that what did you use as your slab in the end?

Falstaff



Joined: 27 May 2009
Posts: 1014

PostPosted: Mon Feb 09, 15 2:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

vegplot wrote:



We are.


Yes I saw that

Quite interesting

Ty Gwyn



Joined: 22 Sep 2010
Posts: 4196
Location: Lampeter
PostPosted: Mon Feb 09, 15 2:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

What`s the current situation regarding mortgages on straw build house`s already been constructed?

My thought`s being are they similar to that of timber framed of several years ago,that one could not get a mortgage on one that had been constructed previously if it was nearing its 25yr anniversary,

Or have the regulations changed.

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