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Charcoal burners in Cumbria - pictures
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robkb



Joined: 29 May 2009
Posts: 4205
Location: SE London
PostPosted: Thu Apr 10, 14 1:05 pm    Post subject: Charcoal burners in Cumbria - pictures  Reply with quote    

A photo essay from today's Graun:

http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/gallery/2014/apr/10/charcoal-burners-in-cumbria-in-pictures

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 33628
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu Apr 10, 14 3:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

nice but i hope the grauniad mean low carbon footprint rather than low carbon bbq charcoal which would be as much use as a chocolate poker

joanne



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 7086
Location: Morecambe, Lancashire
PostPosted: Thu Apr 10, 14 3:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Oooh thanks for that - Yealand Redmayne is just up the road from me

Bodger



Joined: 23 May 2006
Posts: 13495

PostPosted: Thu Apr 10, 14 5:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Been there, done that.

http://forum.downsizer.net/about30109.html&highlight=charcoal

http://forum.downsizer.net/about30198.html&highlight=charcoal


Hard work but great fun.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 9541

PostPosted: Thu Apr 10, 14 6:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Been there, done that, on our 3rd kiln of charcoal for the year so far, and may well need to do another firing next week too.

I don't think it is low carbon charcoal either; certainly lower carbon footprint than imported, and less additives too. Ours is almost pure carbon, although I don't have an analysis at present. No binders, stabilizers or lighter fluid added or needed, as is the case with all British lumpwood charcoal.

Ty Gwyn



Joined: 22 Sep 2010
Posts: 3981
Location: Lampeter
PostPosted: Thu Apr 10, 14 9:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I doubt very much its pure carbon ,as it would be hard to light,

The highest carbon i have heard of was 98%,and that was from Anthracite produced in Ireland.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 9541

PostPosted: Fri Apr 11, 14 6:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Not sure Ty Gwyn, but don't forget that charcoal has a very open structure so there is plenty of surface area for the heat to affect. British charcoal is very light in weight and can be lit with just a cigarette lighter if you really want to show off.

Bodger



Joined: 23 May 2006
Posts: 13495

PostPosted: Fri Apr 11, 14 8:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

We should perhaps be talking about the carbon footprint of the charcoal that we use on our BBQ's. Other than the comparatively small quantities of locally produced charcoal, the majority of the stuff that we use comes from mangrove swamps and the like from hundreds if not thousands of miles away.
Its also tends to be rubbish at lighting etc when compared with the home produced stuff.

robkb



Joined: 29 May 2009
Posts: 4205
Location: SE London
PostPosted: Fri Apr 11, 14 10:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Which is why we tend to buy several bags at a time direct from the producer when we go to woodfairs.

Ty Gwyn



Joined: 22 Sep 2010
Posts: 3981
Location: Lampeter
PostPosted: Fri Apr 11, 14 10:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Agree Bodger,the carbon footprint is the crux of the matter,similar to the bio fuel power stations obtaining the wood chips from the Southern states of the US,
But like anything else in this country,its cheap and that`s what sell`s in bulk.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 9541

PostPosted: Sat Apr 12, 14 8:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I am glad to say, like most British charcoal producers, that our sales are steadily increasing. We tend to find that once people start to use British charcoal, they stay with it as it is economical and easy lighting. They can then preen themselves about being 'green' as well. Of course there are those that choose it because of its low carbon footprint as well.

Our charcoal is made from wood from the same wood, and is currently being fired and packaged on the same site, so virtually zero 'wood miles' to point of bagging. Only extra fuel used is to deliver it to an outlet or show.

A few years ago there was a big drop in imported charcoal as a lot came from Namibia and they had horrific floods which destroyed their infrastructure, so the charcoal just couldn't get out. This gave British charcoal a boost, as any remaining imported stuff was more expensive, so we were competitive.

bulworthy project



Joined: 27 Jun 2011
Posts: 188
Location: Rackenford, Devon
PostPosted: Sat Apr 12, 14 5:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

There are many reasons that people buy their first bag of british charcoal, but so long as that charcoal was made well they buy subsequent bags because it is a lot better than the imported stuff.

No additives, simply carbonised wood.

Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Sat Apr 12, 14 5:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Anyone had a play with a commercial charcoal retort? I gather they're meant to be more efficient than a traditional kiln, producing more charcoal per given weight of wood.

Ty Gwyn



Joined: 22 Sep 2010
Posts: 3981
Location: Lampeter
PostPosted: Sat Apr 12, 14 8:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

What`s a Charcoal Retort Treacodactyl?

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 33628
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sat Apr 12, 14 8:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

this

with a cracker as well many things are possible

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