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Cracked top on woodburner
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vegplot



Joined: 19 Apr 2007
Posts: 21298
Location: Ynys Môn
PostPosted: Sat Jan 08, 11 1:31 pm    Post subject: Cracked top on woodburner  Reply with quote    

I discovered this morning that our Morso Lion wood burner has a crack in the top, not all the way across but extending about half the depth of the top.

I'm going to leave it for now as we need the heating but I need to repair or replace this later on this year when the weather gets warmer. I've taken the stove apart completely once before so it's not a big job to do but I need to decide whether to repair or replace, if a replacement is available. I'm not sure whether cast iron a few millimetres thick can be welded or whether a plate affixed to the under side using countersunk screws will do the job.

Does anyone have any advice?

Hots



Joined: 23 Sep 2010
Posts: 397
Location: Suffolk
PostPosted: Sat Jan 08, 11 1:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I'm pretty sure you cannot screw into cast iron, it cracks doesn't it?

We had an issue with a cast iron fireback, we wanted to fix it to the back of the fireplace but when we suggested putting a couple of bolts through it the dealer threw his hands up in horror.

vegplot



Joined: 19 Apr 2007
Posts: 21298
Location: Ynys Môn
PostPosted: Sat Jan 08, 11 1:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

It's very machinable, drill, tap, countersink etc. It's not very elastic and it's brittle so it needs so room to expand and contract when exposed to heat.

Brownbear



Joined: 28 May 2007
Posts: 14929
Location: South West
PostPosted: Sat Jan 08, 11 1:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

You can TIG weld it. Just use an iron filler rod.

vegplot



Joined: 19 Apr 2007
Posts: 21298
Location: Ynys Môn
PostPosted: Sat Jan 08, 11 2:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Brownbear wrote:
You can TIG weld it. Just use an iron filler rod.


Thanks. Better get an argon bottle. I've not tried that BOC welder yet, have a TIG torch for it which is still in it's plastic wrap.

Brownbear



Joined: 28 May 2007
Posts: 14929
Location: South West
PostPosted: Sat Jan 08, 11 2:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

It will help avoid cracking if you warm it up with a torch before starting to weld.

Lorrainelovesplants



Joined: 13 Oct 2006
Posts: 6514
Location: Dordogne
PostPosted: Sat Jan 08, 11 3:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

You can weld it with a cast rod, preheat the site first and use a cast rod. make sure you weld thoroughly to avoid fumes escaping.

You will need to V out the crack first, then infill. If you dont feel competent, any good welder could do this.

You could fit a plate underneath, sealing the join with fire cement.

So, you have 2 options.

perhaps you need to think why it happened in the first place, sounds like temperature too high....

Midland Spinner



Joined: 13 Jan 2009
Posts: 2931
Location: Under a green roof
PostPosted: Sat Jan 08, 11 3:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

We had a crack in the top of a stove on the boat - the safety inspector condemmed it out of hand on safety grounds. He'd been to 2 coroners courts to give evidence on Carbon Monoxide deaths in the previous year so he was understandably worried.
If you don't have a CO detector, get out and buy one now! Especially if you intend to keep using the stove until the weather warms up - you might want to put a bit of fire cement into the crack as a temporary measure - you'll have to keep replacing it on a frequent basis, but it's what we did before the inspector called.

Brownbear



Joined: 28 May 2007
Posts: 14929
Location: South West
PostPosted: Sat Jan 08, 11 3:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Lorrainelovesplants wrote:
You can weld it with a cast rod.


You mean MMA weld?

Lorrainelovesplants



Joined: 13 Oct 2006
Posts: 6514
Location: Dordogne
PostPosted: Sat Jan 08, 11 3:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Yes, manual metal arc weld it.

vegplot



Joined: 19 Apr 2007
Posts: 21298
Location: Ynys Môn
PostPosted: Sat Jan 08, 11 4:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Lorrainelovesplants wrote:

perhaps you need to think why it happened in the first place, sounds like temperature too high....


I'm assuming it's temperature related. My worry is that if a crack has formed once it will do it again so I need to look at how the top is secured to ensure it has some movement and yet is sealed properly.

vegplot



Joined: 19 Apr 2007
Posts: 21298
Location: Ynys Môn
PostPosted: Sat Jan 08, 11 4:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Midland Spinner wrote:
We had a crack in the top of a stove on the boat - the safety inspector condemmed it out of hand on safety grounds. He'd been to 2 coroners courts to give evidence on Carbon Monoxide deaths in the previous year so he was understandably worried.
If you don't have a CO detector, get out and buy one now! Especially if you intend to keep using the stove until the weather warms up - you might want to put a bit of fire cement into the crack as a temporary measure - you'll have to keep replacing it on a frequent basis, but it's what we did before the inspector called.


An excellent tip.

We have a CO detector mounted on the wall plus I have a hand held meter which provides a reading of CO levels. I'll be using that when I light the fire this evening.

Midland Spinner



Joined: 13 Jan 2009
Posts: 2931
Location: Under a green roof
PostPosted: Sat Jan 08, 11 4:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

vegplot wrote:
We have a CO detector mounted on the wall plus I have a hand held meter which provides a reading of CO levels. I'll be using that when I light the fire this evening.


Good

Plenty of ventilation as well
(I know that you know, but I feel better if I say it!)

vegplot



Joined: 19 Apr 2007
Posts: 21298
Location: Ynys Môn
PostPosted: Sat Jan 08, 11 4:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Midland Spinner wrote:
vegplot wrote:
We have a CO detector mounted on the wall plus I have a hand held meter which provides a reading of CO levels. I'll be using that when I light the fire this evening.


Good

Plenty of ventilation as well
(I know that you know, but I feel better if I say it!)


It never hurts to keep repeating it.

RichardW



Joined: 24 Aug 2006
Posts: 8433
Location: Llyn Peninsular North Wales
PostPosted: Sat Jan 08, 11 7:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

You could also braze it.

If you do weld it pre & post heat is very important.

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