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Dutch Elm Disease and ask Die Back?
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Bodger



Joined: 23 May 2006
Posts: 13506

PostPosted: Sun Jun 14, 15 10:32 am    Post subject: Dutch Elm Disease and ask Die Back?  Reply with quote    

These two problems with trees here in the UK have received quite a bit of publicity but has anyone heard of their being any problems with Sycamores?

In the last two years, our large previously healthy tree has started to die. Some bows have obviously died, while other parts of it hardly have any leaves. There are portions of the tree which are in full leaf but this season, well over half of it is has been affected in the way that I've described. There isn't any sign of damage to the bark at the base of the tree or anything like that.

Ty Gwyn



Joined: 22 Sep 2010
Posts: 4192
Location: Lampeter
PostPosted: Sun Jun 14, 15 10:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Squirrels most likely.

Bodger



Joined: 23 May 2006
Posts: 13506

PostPosted: Sun Jun 14, 15 11:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

No squirrels in our area. I've seen one since 1988 and I shot that.

Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 33978
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Sun Jun 14, 15 11:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Could it be old age? Everything dies. How old is the tree?

Bodger



Joined: 23 May 2006
Posts: 13506

PostPosted: Sun Jun 14, 15 12:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

it was here when we came in 1988 and it was a fair size then. I've no idea how long they're supposed to live for.
I'll try and get some pictures that illustrate whats going on.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 35014
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sun Jun 14, 15 12:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

they do shed limbs/die back/die sometimes ,this can be due to a variety of.
one fungi that seems fairly common shows as small red " bumpy dots "on the bark and can kill a limb or entire tree.

squizzers do like the bark and sap but they do leave obvious chewing evidence and if the "last of the mohican tails"got shot decades ago i suspect fungi.

Bodger



Joined: 23 May 2006
Posts: 13506

PostPosted: Sun Jun 14, 15 1:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Dead bit.









Healthy bit









Not very healthy bit.








The whole tree.





dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 35014
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sun Jun 14, 15 2:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

it looks like a fairly elderly specimen ,perhaps a bit of surgery would prolong it's life , it might look a bit stumpy when the dead and ill bits get removed.

take the top (poorly looking bit)off imho and leave the bottom half to see if it survives (it might).

making it smaller will also reduce the load on the roots which might revive it a bit (and will certainly prevent the top popping down to the conservatory for a nice mulled cider during a storm ).

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 10470

PostPosted: Sun Jun 14, 15 4:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I don' t think there is anything worse than leaf miner affecting sycamore at the moment, although I think there might be some risks from the continent. Virtually every plant can get things like phytophra though, so check for any bleeding parts of the trunk. Is there any compaction round the roots, or has there been any change in the water table that you are aware of? All things that can affect mature trees, apart from the dreaded squirrels.

Hairyloon



Joined: 20 Nov 2008
Posts: 15215
Location: Today I are mostly being in Yorkshire.
PostPosted: Sun Jun 14, 15 5:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Is the tree particularly important to you? The easiest answer by far is to have it down.
I would not want a sick tree that big that close to my house: it only needs to drop a twig to go through the conservatory.

Found this. Not suggesting that is what you've got or not.

Tavascarow



Joined: 06 Aug 2006
Posts: 8407
Location: South Cornwall
PostPosted: Sun Jun 14, 15 6:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Bodger wrote:






My neighbour down the road has paved his drive & a nice horse chestnut which has no illness whatsoever shows symptoms just like yours.
Purely down to water stress.
They transpire hundreds of gallons of water a day.
Half the roots on your tree aren't getting very much.
(IMHO).

Bodger



Joined: 23 May 2006
Posts: 13506

PostPosted: Sun Jun 14, 15 6:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

The driveway has been like that since before 1988 and thankfully, the tree is quite a bit further from the conservatory than it looks.

Last edited by Bodger on Sun Jun 14, 15 7:15 pm; edited 1 time in total

Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 33978
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Sun Jun 14, 15 7:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

But the tree was thirty years smaller.

Ty Gwyn



Joined: 22 Sep 2010
Posts: 4192
Location: Lampeter
PostPosted: Sun Jun 14, 15 7:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Is`nt that area a gravel/chippings surface?not surpressing any drainage.

Hairyloon



Joined: 20 Nov 2008
Posts: 15215
Location: Today I are mostly being in Yorkshire.
PostPosted: Sun Jun 14, 15 7:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Nick wrote:
But the tree was thirty years smaller.

But it will have grown with the water supply/drainage that the drive provides.
What has changed?

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