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How to.. joint a rabbit
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jema
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 26626
Location: escaped from Swindon
PostPosted: Tue Nov 09, 04 2:02 pm    Post subject: How to.. joint a rabbit  Reply with quote    

A skill worth acquiring, butchers in this country don't do a particularly good job of this, in my opinion, and if you are obtaining your meat earlier in the supply chain then you'll have to do it yourself.

Introduction to jointing a Rabbit

There aren't any pictures to go with this, because I haven't got any. I hope it's clear enough anyway, but if it isn't please post a query in the forums.What you need:What you need: A rabbit, skinned (I'm hoping someone else will cover skinning and paunching, because I'm not particularly good at them.) A large, heavy sharp knife, small sharp knife, cleaver (optional)

What you do:

If the rabbit's head is still attached remove it with a single mighty blow. If you wish to add it to your stock-pot then cut it in half, and wash it well first.Cut off each of the shoulders, and remove the spindly end bit from each one.Cut through the ribcage about half way along. If you look and feel, you should be able to find the head end of the saddle (the meaty bit of the back), this is where you're aiming to cut.

Chop the ribcage, neck and shoulder joints into small pieces and add to your stockpile/pot. Turn to the back end of the rabbit, and with the carcass back uppermost make an incision round the curved part at the top of the leg. This will reveal the hip joint. Cut through the ball and socket joint to detach the legs. Chop the pelvis away from the bottom end of the saddle. Again, chop this up and add it to your stock.The saddle is covered by a membrane, and you need to remove this. Use a small sharp knife, and lift it off in strips without cutting the meat.Nearly there now. You should have two shoulders, two legs, and a whole saddle. You can either stop there, or divide the saddle into two or three with a cleaver, depending on what you are cooking.

Article by Sean

Richy Rich



Joined: 24 Mar 2005
Posts: 31
Location: Coventry - Warwickshire....
PostPosted: Wed Mar 30, 05 12:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Like this article because I am toying, carefully mind, with the thought of a gun... am off to the fields of Wales with LOTS of bunnies for a week soon.

After perfecting my shot however.....

My dad took me through one jointing and skinning session...

As a townie, who's turned, it DOES take some getting used to. I can still remember walking back from the friends house with a brace in my hands feeling odd.

But when you remember that picture of all the meat in the aisles at Sainsbury's it helps me when doing the skinning etc.

Richy

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44206
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Wed Mar 30, 05 12:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Richy Rich wrote:
But when you remember that picture of all the meat in the aisles at Sainsbury's it helps me when doing the skinning etc.


Absolutely. I'll never forget the obscene sight of Tescos a couple of days before Christmas a few years ago, rows and rows of turkeys the size of ostriches for something ridiculous like a fiver. made me feel sick.

Lloyd



Joined: 24 Jan 2005
Posts: 2699

PostPosted: Sun May 22, 05 11:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I have to admit that when I joint a rabbit, I use a meat cleaver, put the carcass face down, and use a mallett with the cleaver to split the hip joint at the spine. That way, each hind leg joint has a chunk of hip with it. Semantics, really, I suppose. It all ends up getting eaten anyway.

hotluca



Joined: 14 Nov 2005
Posts: 67
Location: Lincolnshire
PostPosted: Thu May 11, 06 1:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I had rabbit for the first time at Easter, in a restaurant in France. It was outstanding. So, now I'm now thinking about despatching those that frequent my acreage, and getting on with eating them. One question I have is which bits would you use to mince for burgers? I freely admit it's an idea inspired by HFW, but wondered which bits would be best.

Ta

HL

judith



Joined: 16 Dec 2004
Posts: 22789
Location: Montgomeryshire
PostPosted: Thu May 11, 06 1:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I would keep the saddles for something else and use the rest for burgers, but essentially any part of the rabbit would be fine IMO.

Naomi



Joined: 26 Mar 2005
Posts: 1945

PostPosted: Thu May 11, 06 1:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Some of my friends occasionally drop me off a few rabbits when they have been shooting and I get the job of skinning and jointing etc.
It is easy after a few goes and rabbit meat really is delicious.

We've also made HFW's bunny burgers . We froze loads of them as we were given a large glut of bunnies to process one day.

The whole family got involved, with me skinning jointing/boning them, one son mincing the meat in my old hand mincer, OH cooking onions to add to the mix and eldest son mixing it altogether and shaping them.
We had a conveyer belt type system going and it was really good fun. They tasted great too!!!

Northern_Lad



Joined: 13 Dec 2004
Posts: 14210
Location: Somewhere
PostPosted: Thu May 11, 06 1:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Has anyone asked Sean to turn that into an article yet?

Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 33928
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Thu May 11, 06 1:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Do you mean like this one?

Northern_Lad



Joined: 13 Dec 2004
Posts: 14210
Location: Somewhere
PostPosted: Thu May 11, 06 1:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

nickhowe wrote:
Do you mean like this one?


Yeh, just like this one, but where this one is for chickens, Sean could do one for bunnies.

Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 33928
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Thu May 11, 06 1:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Northern_Lad wrote:
nickhowe wrote:
Do you mean like this one?


Yeh, just like this one, but where this one is for chickens, Sean could do one for bunnies.


Wouldn't this one do? Because, rabbit tastes like chicken anyway.

ps. Are we getting paid for each mention, or is this purely an NL_EgoTrip thang?

Northern_Lad



Joined: 13 Dec 2004
Posts: 14210
Location: Somewhere
PostPosted: Thu May 11, 06 2:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

nickhowe wrote:
Northern_Lad wrote:
nickhowe wrote:
Do you mean like this one?


Yeh, just like this one, but where this one is for chickens, Sean could do one for bunnies.


Wouldn't this one do? Because, rabbit tastes like chicken anyway.


Doesn't everything?

nickhowe wrote:
ps. Are we getting paid for each mention, or is this purely an NL_EgoTrip thang?

Swap the 'a' for an 'o'.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 34721
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu May 11, 06 8:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

custard tastes of chicken .

Grimnir



Joined: 29 Mar 2007
Posts: 372
Location: Northants/Beds border
PostPosted: Sat Apr 05, 08 6:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

This is good but I really feel oh so Townie right now!. I've never skinned, gutted or jointed anything and with such a concise article I really need to see what is going on, I just can't visualise it fully. I guess I'll just have to wait until I can get to my sisters and see if there are any she can teach me with

vegplot



Joined: 19 Apr 2007
Posts: 21298
Location: Ynys Môn
PostPosted: Sat Apr 05, 08 7:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Maybe this would be a good demonstration topic at the DS weekend.

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