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Rob R



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 31902
Location: York
PostPosted: Sun Apr 02, 06 8:19 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

Treacodactyl wrote:
Do you need to dip lambs at all, especially if kept to 14 months? What about looking after their feet and trimming up their bottoms? Are any breeds much easier to look after and less likely to suffer problems than others?


You don't need to dip sheep at all these days- compulsory dipping is again no longer in place, though there are calls for it up in Scotland & other areas where sheep scab is becoming a problem.

The only parasites Tahir would need to look out for during these months are blowfly, though a cypermethrin spot-on product would cover them, and Barrier do a good product for the organic sheep keeper. The other main thing is good hygiene- flies won't strike dry wool, so they'll hunt out the wounded or dirty sheep.

Shorter tailed breeds (not that the breeds tail are any shorter, but different breeders will dock tails to a lesser or greater extent, Texels may have just a stump, some of the hill breeds will have a 3/4 tail left intact) are less likely to get struck.

If he can, he should go for a Native British breed, as most British continental breeds have been bred up & fed up much like the commercial pigs- ie they lay down something, quickly, wether it is worthy of the term 'meat' is another matter. Ideally, in terms of taste, a Jacob or Kerry will be about top, but if you are getting someone in, you are more likely to get a commercial cross or pure breed, and the best ones to look for will be the lleyn, suffolk, mule, half bred, etc. The native breeds/crosses produce a better carcass in their native country.

Joey



Joined: 03 Nov 2004
Posts: 191

PostPosted: Mon Apr 03, 06 7:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

http://www.nationalsheep.org.uk/education/Chapter_11.pdf

See above for explanation of sheep terminology with regional variations.

Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Mon Apr 03, 06 8:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Thanks for the comments Rob, it's been 20 years since I helped out on a sheep farm and that was just a bit help of lambing and herding.

Does anyone know how much would you expect to pay for lambs and what would they cost to be slaughtered and butchered ready for collection?

Louisdog



Joined: 22 Mar 2005
Posts: 716
Location: South Wales
PostPosted: Mon Apr 03, 06 10:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Not sure on the cost of lambs - I think a lot depends on the breed. Shetlands may be around 20 each I think.

Killing costs 9 and cutting 3 around here, we are in West Wales.

Make sure you have enough freezer space for all the meat if you get 9!

Cheers

Rob R



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 31902
Location: York
PostPosted: Mon Apr 03, 06 12:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Louisdog wrote:
Not sure on the cost of lambs - I think a lot depends on the breed. Shetlands may be around 20 each I think.

Killing costs 9 and cutting 3 around here, we are in West Wales.

Make sure you have enough freezer space for all the meat if you get 9!

Cheers


That sounds about right 20-30 and killing & butchering must be cheap in West Wales- 13 or 14 here (lambs & hoggs respectively).

mochyn



Joined: 21 Dec 2004
Posts: 24560
Location: mid-Wales
PostPosted: Mon Apr 03, 06 12:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Don't forget there are 100 diseases of sheep and the first sign of 99 of them is death

Not really, but there are lots of things to which they can fall prey.

Louisdog



Joined: 22 Mar 2005
Posts: 716
Location: South Wales
PostPosted: Mon Apr 03, 06 12:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Hi Mochyn I think you're right - we have a horrible book of sheep diseases and when you anxiously read the 'symptoms' section so you can know what early warning signs to look out for, the first clinical sign is often 'death' !

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44144
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Mon Apr 03, 06 12:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

mochyn wrote:
Don't forget there are 100 diseases of sheep and the first sign of 99 of them is death


Hmm, all of a sudden it seems like a really bad idea

mochyn



Joined: 21 Dec 2004
Posts: 24560
Location: mid-Wales
PostPosted: Mon Apr 03, 06 1:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Noooo, Tahir: never let it be said I put anyone off an interesting project! Especially an edible one...

All you need is a sheep mentor. I don't mean you should start being guided by what the sheep tell you, but find someone who has experience in sheep keeping and get e few books on the subject. Is there a smallholders' club near you? Or look in Country Smallholding for breeders or rare breeds enthusiasts in your area.

Go on: you know you want to. Ah, go on, go on, go on, go on, go on...

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44144
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Mon Apr 03, 06 1:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

mochyn wrote:
All you need is a sheep mentor. I don't mean you should start being guided by what the sheep tell you


Jonnyboy says he does whatever the sheep tell him, he says it was them that told him the trick with the wellies...

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44144
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Mon Apr 03, 06 1:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

mochyn wrote:
Is there a smallholders' club near you?


Not that I know of, but like I say the lady next door's son has cattle on her land, he also does all my tractory bits so he's around every day, he'll be able to help me. I'm talking to him this week about it.

Rob R



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 31902
Location: York
PostPosted: Mon Apr 03, 06 2:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

tahir wrote:
mochyn wrote:
Don't forget there are 100 diseases of sheep and the first sign of 99 of them is death


Hmm, all of a sudden it seems like a really bad idea


Clostridial diseases are the most common ones that produce sudden death, and the seven most common are easily prevented with a single vaccine, so if you do buy lambs in, just check that they have had an initial & booster dose of Heptavac or Ovivac.

If you need any technical info on the subject, just ask- I have a few very heavy books on the subject

Anna-marie



Joined: 18 Sep 2005
Posts: 980
Location: West Wales
PostPosted: Mon Apr 03, 06 2:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Hi Tahir,
Don't forget that you will need to check that movement forms have been completed for them being transported to you. I assume that you have a CPH number?
If not, contact your local DEFRA office for advice on how to obtain one.
You will also need a medicine chart to record all medications given, including vaccinations, worming, de-lousing, etc.
Their feet need to be checked and trimmed approximately monthly, in order to prevent foot-rot.
The best management system for this is vaccination with foot-vax, trimming, and spraying with a tetramycine spray.
Also, when the sheep arrive, you will have to tag them with an "S" tag.
I know it sounds like a lot of fuss, but your local State Veterinary Service will be able to help.
There are loads of free booklets that are really helpful, and the British Wool Marketing Board hold excellent one-day courses to cover issues such as hoof-trimming, dagging, etc.
I bought five ewes and a ram last year (the first time that I have kept sheep), primarily to spin their coloured fleeces, and I have enjoyed every minute of it.
Most of them answer to their names, and they are all friendly, and like to be stroked.
I now have seven lambs from four of the ewes (with the last one due to lamb any day) and they are delightful.
One of them is piebald, and looks like a friesian calf on a photo that I took of him!!
I think the price that you would expect to pay probably depends on their weight at the time of purchase.
I hope that some of this helps, and that I have not put you off!!
Have fun!!
Anna-marie

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44144
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Mon Apr 03, 06 2:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Thanks Ann-marie, lots of good advice there.

Rob R



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 31902
Location: York
PostPosted: Mon Apr 03, 06 3:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

And I'll just add that there are alternatives to teramycin if you're bothered about antibiotic overuse and if you want to know more about the efficacy of the footrot vaccine, I'll get in touch with a friend who was involved with the trials for that product.

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