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Zarza



Joined: 22 Oct 2006
Posts: 91
Location: Either in the kitchen or in the woods, or in between
PostPosted: Thu Oct 26, 06 3:20 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

Giant Polypore (Meripilus giganteus)



Edible and tasty when young (like the one in the picture), very like a dryads saddle but a bit more bittersweet, if you know what I mean. Tough and nasty when old, though.

Has a tendency of turning any stew in whi you use it completely black. Most unappetising to look at, but tasty. Doesn't dry even vaguely well.

Jamanda
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 22 Oct 2006
Posts: 34918
Location: Devon
PostPosted: Thu Oct 26, 06 3:50 pm    Post subject: Parasol mushrooms Reply with quote    

These are Macrolepiota procera. My OH already posted one of the pictures else where on the forum, but I thought they would fit in here.
They were very good to eat, but be quick, they only hung around for 48 hours or so.

I took the photos myself about a week on 14th Oct.



Zarza



Joined: 22 Oct 2006
Posts: 91
Location: Either in the kitchen or in the woods, or in between
PostPosted: Thu Oct 26, 06 4:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Shallow-pored Bolet (Suillus Bovinus)





cab = "Average when fresh, but if you slice it and dry it it becomes really rather nice."

doctoral = "They are edible and a guy I know had pickled them - they were OK at best. I don't think they are very good to eat although I know some people who think they are delicious"

Treacodactyl = "I've tried them, not that good IIRC and often full of maggots!"

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44281
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Thu Oct 26, 06 5:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Excellent, could you (and anyone else) also email me the pics and comments, this'll make it easier for me to collate and format the info while we decide how best to present it.

Should be an excellent resource.

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44281
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Thu Oct 26, 06 5:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Anybody that does this should use "mushroom" as the subject field in their email.

Thanks

Zarza



Joined: 22 Oct 2006
Posts: 91
Location: Either in the kitchen or in the woods, or in between
PostPosted: Thu Oct 26, 06 5:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

The Prince (Agaricus Augustus)





PM me any comment of these ones.

Zarza



Joined: 22 Oct 2006
Posts: 91
Location: Either in the kitchen or in the woods, or in between
PostPosted: Fri Oct 27, 06 3:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Beefsteak Fungus (Fistulina Hepatica)





hedgehogpie's quote:
"It looks disconcertingly like an ox tongue (it's also called Ox Tongue, or Langue de boeuf), when you see it on the tree, with a soft yielding rubbery texture, and a slightly sticky upper surface. The underside is whitish yet it looks and feels not unlike like raw liver, staining deeply red when cut (or possibly well cooked beetroot tho' perhaps not quite as bright).It also bleeds a red sap which makes cooking and preparing it remarkably strange affair and the water a little gory looking if you rinse it.

The fungus didn't have any powerful or distict aroma, just a hint of pleasant sharpness, a little like citrus but not strong (unlike chicken of the woods which is really earthy and fungussy).

It apparently favours Oak or Chestunt , and dead hardwood stumps. In this case it was in the cruck of a live chestnut tree."

cab



Joined: 01 Nov 2004
Posts: 32429

PostPosted: Fri Oct 27, 06 9:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Clitocybe odora, the anise cap



Funny thing the anise cap. Looks rather like a typical clitocybe species, maybe being a bit more slight. Except that its bluey turquoise and smells strongly of anise. Strongly flavoured too; well suited to Chinese cooking. Common, mixed woods normally.

cab



Joined: 01 Nov 2004
Posts: 32429

PostPosted: Fri Oct 27, 06 9:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Lactarius deliciosus, the saffron milk cap






Not that common in England, likes Scotland far better. Pine woods, tasty but not THAT tasty, seems to be something that Spaniards go for.

Lozzie



Joined: 25 May 2005
Posts: 2595

PostPosted: Sat Oct 28, 06 11:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Shaggy Ink Cap or Lawyers' Wig



Zarza



Joined: 22 Oct 2006
Posts: 91
Location: Either in the kitchen or in the woods, or in between
PostPosted: Sat Oct 28, 06 7:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

The Pink Cracking Boletus (Boletus chrysenteron)



cab's quote:
"This one is likely to be the most surprising to other foragers. It isn’t the tastiest , that honour falls to the fabulously tasty penny bun or cep, B. edulis. Nor is it even one that is highly sought after, being largely overlooked by most pickers. But it is edible, and if you know how to use it, it is useful addition to your repertoire.


The pink cracking boletus is an exceptionally common mushroom. Like other species of , it is mycorhizal, growing in association with certain trees (this one has a preference for broad leaved trees, I find oak to be one if its favourites). You’ll find it in parks, woodlands, anywhere with a bit of grass around a few trees, all through later summer and into autumn. Its pores are yellowish, bruising green, and the flesh bruises very slowly blue.


It is, as ever, imperative to avoid confusion with other species, but the identification of boletes is a lot less fraught than it might appear; according to Mabey, in his seminal work “Food for Free”, all of the in Britain that are poisonous have red or purple on the stem or the pores.


When you find your , I recommend drying it; all of the boletes benefit from the drying process, which intensifies their flavour. It’s a bit squidgy when fresh, so use it in recipes that don’t lose out from that; it makes a tasty, if slightly green pate."

Zarza



Joined: 22 Oct 2006
Posts: 91
Location: Either in the kitchen or in the woods, or in between
PostPosted: Sat Oct 28, 06 7:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Poplar Fieldcap (Agrocybe cylindracea)



cab's quote:
"Most of the wild mushroom books that even mention this species list it as being rare. I’ve never come across a guide to edible wild mushrooms that even mentions it. And in all honesty, it isn’t the most widely spread wild mushroom. But when you do find it, you are likely to find so very much of it. The secret is to look for old willows, such as you find lining river banks across East Anglia and much of the rest of the South of England, and it is on the roots of such trees that you find this mushroom growing. Most mushroom hunters restrict themselves to woodlands, and that means that the forager looking on riverbanks has no competition.

It is a mushroom with a good, solid texture, a little bit of crunch to it unless you really cook it. So make the most of that by cooking it in Chinese recipes, where it can be used in place of shitake. It dries only passably well, so pick only enough for your immediate use rather than picking to stock up your winter stocks.

You can find this mushroom almost any time of the year, but you are most likely to find it from late summer, and it often turns up after a frost."

mimborin



Joined: 24 Oct 2006
Posts: 895
Location: near Southampton/ Winchester (Romsey)
PostPosted: Sat Oct 28, 06 10:18 pm    Post subject: Boletus Edulis - The penny bun / Cep / Porcini Reply with quote    






Notice the giraffe like pattern shown on the upper stype/stem. This one could be confused with a few other Boletus. Make sure if you do find one that it has not passed its 'use by date' and is fresh with finely packed white pores on the underside of the cap, as pictured.

Last edited by mimborin on Mon Oct 30, 06 10:07 am; edited 2 times in total

mimborin



Joined: 24 Oct 2006
Posts: 895
Location: near Southampton/ Winchester (Romsey)
PostPosted: Sun Oct 29, 06 8:51 am    Post subject: Auricularia auricula-judae 'jew's ear' Reply with quote    

The fungi with a non-pc name. Good for casseroles and stews but quite tasetless otherwise.




This one could possibly be confused with jelly fungi (see below), but once you have found auricula for the first time it is difficult to confuse the next time.



Click to see full size image

Last edited by mimborin on Mon Oct 30, 06 10:12 am; edited 1 time in total

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44281
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Sun Oct 29, 06 9:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

HI thanks for all the stuff so far, I know it's a bit of hassle but could people please also email me the pics/description. This'll make it a LOT easier for me to get them into the DB that Jema and I are deliberating on.

Obviously the material will be used only on Downsizer.

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