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New Allotment... Maybe...
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cab



Joined: 01 Nov 2004
Posts: 32429

PostPosted: Thu Feb 10, 05 4:29 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

Heat treated sets? I shall investigate thanks.

Growing onions on my native Tyneside used to be so much easier. Shorter warm season perhaps, but a little bit more rain so less bolting. Down here I've found shallots to be a better bet.

gavin



Joined: 10 Feb 2005
Posts: 93
Location: Leeds, W Yorks
PostPosted: Thu Feb 10, 05 6:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Just one random thought on choosing low-maintenance veg - grow chard (rather than spinach - bit earthy to eat raw in a salad, to my taste, but great to cook as a replacement for spinach; and much more reliable and easier to grow).

Other than that, it's not so much your choice of veg - they'll all need a bit of care at times, and grow happily at others, depending on weather and season?

It's the allotment "conveniences" that'd I'd look at

- Access! How far do you have to barrow stuff (my huge load of manure - 150 yards away - learn by your mistakes!)?

- Water - can you use a hose? Is the water source very close? Do you have 2-3 barrels you could link up with a hose siphon so you're not carrying water so much?

- And the soil - partly what it is (clay = VERY heavy work but fertile; sand = lots of work and maintenance; a fertile loam - easy, less work, and good fertiity); and partly how you get the allotment - clearing an overgrown plot is hard work.

See if you can take on half a plot, with an option to take over the other half if it's working out well?

Good luck - Gavin

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44144
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Thu Feb 10, 05 6:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

And remember to post the local societies details too.

Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Thu Feb 10, 05 6:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

If they get established pumpkins would be worth a try. We still have some ripe ones overwintering.

Being on chalk we've found onions tend to bolt but shallots grow better and are less prone.

Good luck, if there are any nettles you'll know what to do.

Bugs



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 10744

PostPosted: Thu Feb 10, 05 8:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Ermm...have an idea for some articles on the main site along the line of allotments...there've been three threads I'd like to pillage (or have pillaged)

- this one (easy/low maintenance crops for the allotment)
- Cab's "interesting veg to try"
- Sugarplumhalle's (I think?) what to plant on the allotment in general.

Does anybody already have any of these up their sleeve/any thoughts/would like to volunteer to write them up? At all?

Behemoth



Joined: 01 Dec 2004
Posts: 19021
Location: Leeds
PostPosted: Fri Feb 11, 05 9:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

In a fit of romantic stupidity I took the furthest plot from the gate at the highest point of the site because it gives me a distant view of Leeds Town Hall where I got married. It is however a hike to get materials up there and is not near a tap. However I don't think I'd change it now.

In terms of watering stuff I've only been growing stuff for a year and last summer did the watering for me, I found that pretty much everything got my without any assistance, though the french beans could have done with a bit of help. Where I made errors was not in thinning or transplanting at the correct time.

cab



Joined: 01 Nov 2004
Posts: 32429

PostPosted: Fri Feb 11, 05 10:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

gavin wrote:
Just one random thought on choosing low-maintenance veg - grow chard (rather than spinach - bit earthy to eat raw in a salad, to my taste, but great to cook as a replacement for spinach; and much more reliable and easier to grow).


I quite agree; we grow 'bright lights' chard in our garden already, it's great as a combination ornamental and edible plant, and it lasts all winter. The only downer is that it will tend to bolt in the dry.

Quote:
Other than that, it's not so much your choice of veg - they'll all need a bit of care at times, and grow happily at others, depending on weather and season?

It's the allotment "conveniences" that'd I'd look at

- Access! How far do you have to barrow stuff (my huge load of manure - 150 yards away - learn by your mistakes!)?


Errm, these ones are about 2/3 of a mile away, along a straight, flat road; I cycle past them nearly every day.

Quote:
- Water - can you use a hose? Is the water source very close? Do you have 2-3 barrels you could link up with a hose siphon so you're not carrying water so much?


That's going to be a biggy for me, and one I'm going to look at tonight. I want an allotment that is at least close to a water pump.

Quote:
- And the soil - partly what it is (clay = VERY heavy work but fertile; sand = lots of work and maintenance; a fertile loam - easy, less work, and good fertiity); and partly how you get the allotment - clearing an overgrown plot is hard work.


Agreed. I know the soil here now (it's not bad, but it needs lots of organic stuff added to it, it's a tendency to dryness). So it comes down to how much clearing will be needed.

Quote:
See if you can take on half a plot, with an option to take over the other half if it's working out well?

Good luck - Gavin


Cheers Gavin. You've reinforced a lot that I was already thinking about. The idea of taking on a little plot with a vacant neighbour is a nice one too

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