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Mashed potatoes - how do you do yours?
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Bugs



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 10744

PostPosted: Mon Feb 21, 05 1:08 pm    Post subject: Mashed potatoes - how do you do yours? Reply with quote
    

Normally, on the floor, with a normal masher. But one broke, and another turned out to smell funny (nylon for the non stick pans).

I may buy a new metal one to use in the s/s pan, or I might try out my hand blender, which Amazon (that reliable source of culinary info) says is suitable, but which everyone else says will turn them to glue. I thought about a ricer, as recommended by the Great Hugh, but don't fancy yet another bit of kitchen equipment unless it is really going to make a big difference. Delia uses an electric whisk but I'm definitely not going to get one of them (I think the balloon whisk on the hand blender would be too delicate).

At the moment we get by with a wooden spoon and a sieve if I feel really engergetic. I like them very smooth. Sorry for the long post but mashed potatoes are very important to me. Mmm. Mash. Can we have mash for dinner Treacodactyl???

So anyway, how do you do yours?

Jonnyboy



Joined: 29 Oct 2004
Posts: 23956
Location: under some rain.
PostPosted: Mon Feb 21, 05 1:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Usual mash method or a potato ricer which does make the nicest mash without resort to loads of cream & butter

We bought our ricer from tk max for about a fiver.

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44634
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Mon Feb 21, 05 1:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Just a normal masher here

judith



Joined: 16 Dec 2004
Posts: 22789
Location: Montgomeryshire
PostPosted: Mon Feb 21, 05 1:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

By hand with an SS masher. With loads of butter if I'm feeling decadent or a little hot milk if I'm being good. I hate really smooth mash as it reminds me of school dinners. Much happier with a few lumps and/or bits of potato skin.

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44634
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Mon Feb 21, 05 1:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

We like lumps, nice with a few carrots chucked in too

Bugs



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 10744

PostPosted: Mon Feb 21, 05 1:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Eeeeeeeyuck to lumps and carrots . Mmmm smoooooth potato. With butter. And perhaps some cheese.

judith



Joined: 16 Dec 2004
Posts: 22789
Location: Montgomeryshire
PostPosted: Mon Feb 21, 05 1:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

I'll second the carrots! Yummmm!

sean
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 42089
Location: North Devon
PostPosted: Mon Feb 21, 05 1:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Normal masher here, or a mouli-legumes if I want reallllyy smooooooth. And a mouli is good for other things too.

Sarah D



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 2584

PostPosted: Mon Feb 21, 05 2:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

You will get gluey wallpaper paste if you put it in a blender; you can beat them in a Kenwood with the K beater, though. I have a proper wooden, old fashioned masher, just a thick stick type thing, which is much more effective than the metal one. Butter and a bit of milk and seasoning here.
I have a ricer too, but find it quite slow to get through a whole potful, although the ricer is a catering size one; the potato gets cold waiting for the rest to get throught the ricer - if you put the pot back on the stove the bottom layer burns and sticks to the pot.
I always make extra mash - good for tattie scones, bubble and squeaks, topping Red Dragon and Shepherd's pies, etc. Daughter eats it cold from the fridge with salad cream..............

jema
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 26979
Location: escaped from Swindon
PostPosted: Mon Feb 21, 05 2:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Normal masher here, though I keep on hearing a ricer is better.

chrissy



Joined: 20 Feb 2005
Posts: 238
Location: Pangbourne
PostPosted: Mon Feb 21, 05 2:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

I use a good old masher. With butter. Swede and carrot mashed together is really good too. I have a potato ricer and would probably use it for small quantities, but am usually doing too much so it sits in the cupboard...

Jonnyboy



Joined: 29 Oct 2004
Posts: 23956
Location: under some rain.
PostPosted: Mon Feb 21, 05 2:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Champ is of course the finest meal you can make, a big bowl of mash with it's own little lake of melted butter.

Personally I think the choice of spud is far more important than the way you mash them. Waxy spuds will give you glue, you need floury ones that have been allowed to steam dry after cooking.

Sarah D



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 2584

PostPosted: Mon Feb 21, 05 2:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

The drying bit is very important, isn't it? Makes all the difference. I put them back in the pot and give them a good shake over the stove top.

Jonnyboy



Joined: 29 Oct 2004
Posts: 23956
Location: under some rain.
PostPosted: Mon Feb 21, 05 2:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Sarah D wrote:
The drying bit is very important, isn't it? Makes all the difference. I put them back in the pot and give them a good shake over the stove top.


I think so, I do the same but you have to watch that they don't stick.

selfsufficientish



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 364
Location: Bristol
PostPosted: Mon Feb 21, 05 3:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

I like to throw in a clove of garlic too during the boiling. mix in half a sweet potato is good too, or a little bit of butternut squash. My girlfried always ends up havign to 'guess the root vegetable' whenever I make mash as something other than just potatoes will end up in the mix.

No one mentioned putting a bit of cream in either. I only do this if we happen to have some, but it is nice.

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