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Tree growing times
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Treacodactyl
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Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Tue Mar 08, 05 12:06 pm    Post subject: Tree growing times  Reply with quote    

Does anyone know where I can get some information on tree growing times from? The main details I'm after are how long it would take from planting a 1 year old seedling to a first coppice for firewood & charcoal (assuming average quality soil and conditions), so about a 2 inch diameter.

I know it would depend on the trees planted but I would be looking to coppice for fire wood so I would be looking at trees like ash. I have seen a hybrid poplar available that can grow 18 foot a year, but I'm not sure if they are suitable for coppice or firewood (I vaguely remember poplar wood doesn't give off a great deal of heat).

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44104
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Tue Mar 08, 05 12:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Speak to martin crawford at:

www.agroforestry.co.uk

Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Tue Mar 08, 05 12:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I'll have a chat, has anyone asked for an article from them?

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44104
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Tue Mar 08, 05 12:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Several times, he's busy at the moment, but will think about it when he's got a mo.

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44104
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Tue Mar 08, 05 12:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Tell him where you heard about him

judith



Joined: 16 Dec 2004
Posts: 22789
Location: Montgomeryshire
PostPosted: Tue Mar 08, 05 12:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I can strongly recommend the book "Tree Planting & Aftercare" edited by Elizabeth Agate and published by the BTCV. ISBN 0 946752 25 7. Very clearly written, with loads of information about planning, what to plant and where, rotations, when to harvest, etc, etc.

wellington womble



Joined: 08 Nov 2004
Posts: 14947
Location: East Midlands
PostPosted: Tue Mar 08, 05 6:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Try John seymour - someones borrowed mine, but i vaguely recall something about it.

In spain they use spanish oak for the brick factory as it grew fast and produced lots of heat when burned - but i'd guess you're after a local species?

judyofthewoods



Joined: 29 Jan 2005
Posts: 804
Location: Pembrokeshire
PostPosted: Tue Mar 08, 05 8:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Ash is the best, it is relatively fast growing, and has a relatively low water content. It splits easily, smells lovely and burns at just the right rate. Oak is the timber equivalent to anthracite, you need a less dense wood to get the flames for oak to catch, difficult to burn on its own. It will take ten years plus for the young tree to be big enough to cut down the first time, but once you have a more mature root, the stool will produce several shoots after the cutting and the anual increment will be greater. Not sure about rotation length, will have to dig out the books (most things are in boxes stored away), but would tink its in the 15-20 year range for a 3"-4" log. Willow grows fast, but also burns fast, and has a high water content, which needs longer drying, and the great bulk for its BTUs hoggs space unnecessarily, not to mention the smell of stale urin you can get from it.

Lloyd



Joined: 24 Jan 2005
Posts: 2699

PostPosted: Tue Mar 08, 05 9:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Seedlings of what?...For coppicing, Willow is VERY quick, if not in competition with other stuff, even grass. After year one, cut to ground level, and then the poles will all spring up. If you run two patches, alternate them on a one and two year coupe, so that you have something to harvest every year.

Lloyd



Joined: 24 Jan 2005
Posts: 2699

PostPosted: Tue Mar 08, 05 9:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

If doing it for income, Hazel products cost a fortune!!...Just been searching on hazel, in Google!

organic john



Joined: 27 Jan 2005
Posts: 95
Location: Raunds, Northants
PostPosted: Thu Mar 10, 05 6:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

if you want hazel i got loads of it 3 acres if your interested??

Gertie



Joined: 08 Jan 2005
Posts: 1638
Location: Yorkshire
PostPosted: Thu Mar 10, 05 6:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I know you'll probably think this is a daft question, Madman, but what sort of things do you get in hazel? (I don't know the difference between willow and hazel, or do I is hazel normally a copper colour)

Sorry for being a dunce on this subject!!

Lloyd



Joined: 24 Jan 2005
Posts: 2699

PostPosted: Thu Mar 10, 05 6:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

organic john wrote:
if you want hazel i got loads of it 3 acres if your interested??


Get coppicing, John!!

Lloyd



Joined: 24 Jan 2005
Posts: 2699

PostPosted: Thu Mar 10, 05 6:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Gertie wrote:
I know you'll probably think this is a daft question, Madman, but what sort of things do you get in hazel?


Mainly garden stuff, fence hurdles, archways, woven garden furniture, baskets, trugs, etc.

Gertie



Joined: 08 Jan 2005
Posts: 1638
Location: Yorkshire
PostPosted: Fri Mar 11, 05 4:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Sounds a good way of making a bit of money, John!

I'll second Madman - get coppicing!!!!!!!

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