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Road Kill
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Post new topic   Reply to topic    Downsizer Forum Index -> Shooting and Trapping for the Pot
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Jonnyboy



Joined: 29 Oct 2004
Posts: 23924
Location: under some rain.
PostPosted: Fri Dec 10, 04 11:44 am    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

Nope,

Quote:
None of the wild blackberry samples had lead concentrations above 1 mg/kg.There was no significant difference between the samples taken from urban sites and urban road sites. However, the mean concentration of lead in urban samples (0.093 mg/kg) was significantly greater (at a 0.01 per cent level) than in the rural samples (0.012 mg/kg)( Table 4b) which suggests that localised environmental contamination in urban areas does contribute to higher lead levels in wild blackberries. The mean concentration of lead found in blackberries in this survey (0.05 mg/kg) is less than that found in commercial fresh blackberries (0.07 mg/kg) in a previous MAFF survey.

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44270
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Fri Dec 10, 04 11:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I find that truly amazing, I can't tell you how many times I've disgusted the mother in law by encouraging her grandchildren to pick and eat wild blackberries. I really am stunned.

Jonnyboy



Joined: 29 Oct 2004
Posts: 23924
Location: under some rain.
PostPosted: Fri Dec 10, 04 11:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Why? I'm not surprised that they have less than a commercial variety.

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44270
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Fri Dec 10, 04 11:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

But why should commercially grown ones have greater lead concentration?

Jonnyboy



Joined: 29 Oct 2004
Posts: 23924
Location: under some rain.
PostPosted: Fri Dec 10, 04 12:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Intensive conditions, industrial machinery, mechanical processing, location. etc

I don't really know but I'm not that surprised.

jema
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 26640
Location: escaped from Swindon
PostPosted: Fri Dec 10, 04 12:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Jonnyboy wrote:
Intensive conditions, industrial machinery, mechanical processing, location. etc

I don't really know but I'm not that surprised.


Calling Cab! Because TBH that does not make a lot of sense to me!

jema

Dunc



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 134
Location: Lancashire
PostPosted: Fri Dec 10, 04 12:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

That is a strange one. On a logical level you wouldn't expect farmed blackberries to have higher concentrations but quite a few of us here seem to have had the same instinctive reaction.

Legion



Joined: 24 Nov 2004
Posts: 170
Location: Western isles, Scotland
PostPosted: Fri Dec 10, 04 3:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

High Green Farm wrote:
Can I make an obvious comment here. If you were responsible for the kill, then why wouldn't you eat it? Surely there is no more chance that the pheasant that you hit with the car is poisoned, than the pheasant that you shoot on your land is?


Then all I can say is happy munching - what do i know

cab



Joined: 01 Nov 2004
Posts: 32429

PostPosted: Fri Dec 10, 04 4:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Farming is associated with contamination. Live with it.

Farms use manure, other fertilisers, insecticides, herbicides, etc. They use the same soil over and over again, and they have food-handling machinery to get the food from the plant all the way to packing, and eventually to the plate. All of those inputs contain some manner of contamination, as -everything- is contaminated.

That contamination is concentrated by the practice of farming; makes sense, it mostly goes into the soil, gets eaten by soil microbes which use up the bulk of the nirtogen and carbon, leaving trace elements. It's hardly surprising that farming (-any- farming) should be associated with a higher (but still entirely tolerable) concentration of metal ions like lead, nickel, copper, etc.

Think of the soil as being a means for reducing organic mass. Muck goes in, carbon dioxide, comes out, leaving a wonderful organic humus. Everything that was in the muck that can't be turned into a gaseous waste product also remains there until such a point as it gets adsorbed onto a root or suchlike.

It's harmless, and it's happened for as long as there has been agriculture. It's pronably -slightly- worse in inorganic agriculture, where you have more chemical inputs, each of which will have associated contamination, but I wouldn't lose any sleep over it.

leebu



Joined: 23 Nov 2004
Posts: 418
Location: east yorkshire
PostPosted: Fri Dec 10, 04 4:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Cab wrote:


Think of the soil as being a means for reducing organic mass. Muck goes in, carbon dioxide, comes out, leaving a wonderful organic humus.


Wouldn't like to eat at YOUR greek restaurant!

andrewheywood



Joined: 09 Dec 2004
Posts: 17

PostPosted: Fri Dec 10, 04 8:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

The "never eat road kill period" comment because they may have been poisioned is just plain ignorant. Of all the road kill I have eaten (say about 20 pheasant, 6 hare, 12 rabbit and 1 deer) I have enjoyed all of them and they were very tasty.

I have however been VERY sick after eating a precooked chicken from Tescos - so everyone please ignore and daft so-and-so who tells you not to eat road kill

facts are fact - and urban myths are just stories put about by lunes.

thankyou

sean
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 41968
Location: North Devon
PostPosted: Fri Dec 10, 04 8:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Trit-trot......
The advice about road-kill may or may not be valid. If you eat pre-cooked chickens from Tescos you deserve all you get

Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Fri Dec 10, 04 8:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Sorry if I've missed something, but I thought Legion was saying that if it's dead and you don't know what killed it it may have been poisoned. Also if you do hit it this could be because it's responses were not very good because it may have been poisoned. If you see it before you shoot it I hope you would be able to get an idea if it's a healthy specimen.

Personally I think this is a fair point as I bet it's happened many tims, some areas may be worse than others. Down here where the shoots just seem to release a large pen of daft pheasants they seem to have no sense at all and I would assume that any road kill is just because they haven't got a clue what they are doing.

Rather than dismiss the comments I would certainly think about them. I also don't eat supermarket chickens.

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44270
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Fri Dec 10, 04 8:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Treacodactyl wrote:
Rather than dismiss the comments I would certainly think about them.


Well said

andrewheywood



Joined: 09 Dec 2004
Posts: 17

PostPosted: Fri Dec 10, 04 9:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

heavens above!!! food snob alert!!! food snob alert !!! food snob alert!!!

You HAVE shopped in super markets and bother to deny it


food snobs - get real

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