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Adventure installing a woodburning stove
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joanne



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 7095
Location: Morecambe, Lancashire
PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 08 10:48 am    Post subject: Adventure installing a woodburning stove  Reply with quote    

We've finally started on the not so simple task of installing wood burning stoves in the house - First one to tackle (mainly cos the decor is so appalling!) is the one in our dining room

You can see the original fire place behind my friend David in his beekeeping suit along with our lovely 1970's carpet and piles of clutter !



Next stage was to remove the fire and surround and knock off the plaster



Which revealed that we did infact have a supporting lintel and that the fire was actually just bricked up

So 10 bags of rubble and about 70 bricks later we have this (I've put the picture back in the same spot so you can get some perspective)



The pipes hanging down are the water pipes from the old back boiler - we are planning on putting in a stove with a back boiler to heat our water

Next stage is now - rendering the whole of the fireplace - What's the best way to do this ? Gervase ? - The house is a 1935 Brick built semi

Then obviously we need to install the baffle plate and tile or fit a hearth before installing the stove - I haven't decided what I want exactly yet

judith



Joined: 16 Dec 2004
Posts: 22789
Location: Montgomeryshire
PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 08 10:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Ah rubble.
It's nice to see someone else with a living room full of the stuff!
Nice big fireplace though. It will look great with a stove in there.

sean
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 41992
Location: North Devon
PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 08 10:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I think that there are building regs about the nature of the hearth. Woodsprite's OH will know.

Northern_Lad



Joined: 13 Dec 2004
Posts: 14210
Location: Somewhere
PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 08 11:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

sean wrote:
I think that there are building regs about the nature of the hearth. Woodsprite's OH will know.


I think the hearth must be fireproof and extend 9" beyond the stove.

joanne



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 7095
Location: Morecambe, Lancashire
PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 08 11:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I know it has to come out 225mm beyond the front of the firebox and that the stove has to have a certain amount of space around it

50mm at the back,

You must have a gap of 150mm each side of the stove to non combustible materials and 230mm if there are combustible materials to the side,

You must have 230mm above the stove to non combustible materials and 460mm above the stove if there are combustible materials (for example wood)

We also have to have an air vent in the room if the output of the stove is more than 5KW venting to an external air source

We have had the chimney's cleaned and checked and thankfully they don't need lining

Mary-Jane



Joined: 13 Jan 2005
Posts: 18397
Location: The Fishing Strumpet is from Ceredigion in West Wales
PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 08 11:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

judith wrote:
Ah rubble.
It's nice to see someone else with a living room full of the stuff!


*Sigh* Aye, I know that feeling too.

Mary-Jane



Joined: 13 Jan 2005
Posts: 18397
Location: The Fishing Strumpet is from Ceredigion in West Wales
PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 08 11:18 am    Post subject: Re: Adventure installing a woodburning stove Reply with quote    

jocorless wrote:
Next stage is now - rendering the whole of the fireplace - What's the best way to do this ? Gervase ? - The house is a 1935 Brick built semi

Then obviously we need to install the baffle plate and tile or fit a hearth before installing the stove - I haven't decided what I want exactly yet


I'll get Gervase on to this when he gets home tonight Jo.

joanne



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 7095
Location: Morecambe, Lancashire
PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 08 11:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Thanks Mary-Jane - We want to get it done ASAP especially before September because until we have wood-burning stoves - the only source of heating in the house is a small gas heater in the hallway!

Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 08 11:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

sean wrote:
I think that there are building regs about the nature of the hearth. Woodsprite's OH will know.


I also think that connecting a stove to an existing chimney is now covered by Part J of the building regs. I think suitably qualified installers can self certify. Worth checking.

joanne



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 7095
Location: Morecambe, Lancashire
PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 08 12:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

If you install a chimney lining - that comes under the building regs and therefore has to be checked by a building inspector or be done by a qualified installer - If you don't line it - you don't come under the regs which is why we had the chimney tested to see if it needed lining as it was worth the cost compared to £750 of chimney lining plus fitting!

Will



Joined: 30 Jun 2005
Posts: 571
Location: Grenoside, Sheffield
PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 08 12:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

We acid washed and sealed the brickwork, then just plastered the outer wall rather than rendering the whole lot.

We took out a repro art deco surround which had been installed in front of the original. The quantity of rubble is truly scary.

boisdevie1



Joined: 11 Aug 2006
Posts: 3897
Location: Lancaster
PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 08 12:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Good luck with the work. The only problem is that modern houses are not really designed for the storage of wood. My friend in Lancaster has a similar problem of finding where to store his wood. But once installed they are lovely. We've got one and a second one on order for Septemer. But here firewood is readily available and not expensive.

joanne



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 7095
Location: Morecambe, Lancashire
PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 08 12:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Ahh we've plenty of space to store the wood - the joys of having a large (110ft) garden in suburbia and intend to build a proper wood store when we do the patio's next year - we are raising them up to the level of the house and putting in the equivalent of a double garage underneath them but it will be a wood store, workshop and storage area

We also have access to a limitless supply of free well seasoned wood - our friends who also have a wood burning stove gets all the off-cuts from their friend who is a tree surgeon - they only have one stove and he regularly delivers them 12 months worth - 2 or 3 times a year!

wellington womble



Joined: 08 Nov 2004
Posts: 14976
Location: East Midlands
PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 08 5:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Wood burners are lovely. I don't even mind lugging the wood about for ours (well, not since we moved and the woodstore isn't at the other end of our previous 100 foot garden! That was a mistake!) You won't regret it.

vegplot



Joined: 19 Apr 2007
Posts: 21298
Location: Ynys Môn
PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 08 6:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I'd like to buy a small woodland. With fuel prices soaring and people getting wise to wood it may be a good investment but finding it is difficult.

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