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Plants that shouldn't be sold or grown.
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Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Fri May 13, 05 7:41 pm    Post subject: Plants that shouldn't be sold or grown.  Reply with quote    

Following on from recent post I thought it would be good to write an article making people more aware of what plants have been sold that are real thugs and not only take over the garden but also are a huge threat to our countryside. An obvious example is Japanese knot weed, that can no longer be sold and needs special care to dispose of.

There are however many other plants that cause problems and are still sold so if you have any suggestions of thugs please post details. For example Spanish bluebells, which are legally available but shouldn't be planted.

I'll also look up details of what's being done to try and prevent these plants from being sold, any help and info would be great.

thos



Joined: 08 Mar 2005
Posts: 1137
Location: Jauche, Duchy of Brabant (Bourgogne-ci) and Charolles, Duchy of Burgundy (Bourgogne-ça)
PostPosted: Fri May 13, 05 7:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

My vote goes to the elder. A lovely plant with fantastic flowers, but the devil to dig out when you have too many.

joanne



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 7086
Location: Morecambe, Lancashire
PostPosted: Fri May 13, 05 8:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Russian Vine - I detest that stuff

Joanne

wellington womble



Joined: 08 Nov 2004
Posts: 14944
Location: East Midlands
PostPosted: Fri May 13, 05 9:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

mint?

I bought a gardening book recently, which had a page dedicated what shouldn't be grown as it wasn't native and would spread, and semi-warnings about some some plants - it was an american book though so the plants didn't apply - one of them was yarrow, i recall!

gavin



Joined: 10 Feb 2005
Posts: 93
Location: Leeds, W Yorks
PostPosted: Sun May 15, 05 9:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Category C plants???

Russian vine can do a good job of holding a rickety shed together

Mint needs tight control - so does horseradish; and the comfreys (not the sterile Bocking 14). Feverfew?

All best - Gavin

cab



Joined: 01 Nov 2004
Posts: 32429

PostPosted: Sun May 15, 05 10:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Rhododendrons. The species that can spread in our woodlands, bloody awful stuff. Pretty, but destructive.

I'd also be careful not to grow plants that look edible but aren't; I took the liberty of uprooting some deadly nightshade from just outside the gates of a local primary school two years ago. Didn't seem the right place for it (and it's common enough locally anyway).

Gervase



Joined: 17 Nov 2004
Posts: 8655

PostPosted: Mon May 16, 05 8:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Mint's OK if you either grow it in a pot or cut the bottom out of an old bucket and put that in the bed and then put the mint in it to stop it spreading. I couldn't be without the stuff!
Absoloutely concur on rhododendrons - pointless bloody things anyway/

cab



Joined: 01 Nov 2004
Posts: 32429

PostPosted: Mon May 16, 05 8:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I cycled past a great big hemlock plant by the Cam yesterday. It's right by a pathway, at one of the bridges. Don't really like it there, but I guess it'll do no harm.

judith



Joined: 16 Dec 2004
Posts: 22789
Location: Montgomeryshire
PostPosted: Mon May 16, 05 8:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

gavin wrote:
Feverfew?


That one gets my vote too. I didn't listen to my sister when she told me not to plant it in my garden.

cab



Joined: 01 Nov 2004
Posts: 32429

PostPosted: Mon May 16, 05 8:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Judith wrote:

That one gets my vote too. I didn't listen to my sister when she told me not to plant it in my garden.


Ahh, yes. We got it in a 'wild flower' seed mix. That and borage made a concerted attempt to take over the garden. It was only stopped by the lemon balm.

Feverfew is a beautiful plant, but such a thug.

wellington womble



Joined: 08 Nov 2004
Posts: 14944
Location: East Midlands
PostPosted: Mon May 16, 05 9:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I must have black fingers! My mint is struggling, and hanging on by a leaf or two, my lemon balm died, and although I had feverfew for a year or too, its gone now. I've had borage in the past, but it hasn't self seeded, and my boston ivy apppears to have died as well.

Perhaps I should rent myself out as an organic weedkiller!

I have lots of bindweed turning up in unexpected (and awkward) places though!

nettie



Joined: 02 Dec 2004
Posts: 5886
Location: Suffolk
PostPosted: Mon May 16, 05 6:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Vinca major. Bloody nuisance.

mochyn



Joined: 21 Dec 2004
Posts: 24560
Location: mid-Wales
PostPosted: Thu May 19, 05 8:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

And then there's the water plants: from Greater Reed Mace to the native Water-Lily, Fairy Fern... there's a long list!

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44076
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Thu May 19, 05 9:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Mochyn, I don't want to pressure you or anything but you'd be the ideal person to do an article on invasive plants that should be avoided.

mochyn



Joined: 21 Dec 2004
Posts: 24560
Location: mid-Wales
PostPosted: Thu May 19, 05 9:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I'm going to shut up now.

I'll have a think...

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