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Oil pollution in pond
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crofter



Joined: 11 Feb 2007
Posts: 2252

PostPosted: Tue Mar 17, 09 2:35 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

Behemoth wrote:
Does the pond have an overflow - raise the water level until the fule runs off?


This is not a good idea. It will just move the oil somewhere else and you would then be responsible for causing pollution to the rest of the watercourse. Cleaning up oil properly is expensive and (I'm guessing) your neighbour is denying responsibility because he does not want to pay for this. Ideally you need a boom to contain the oil in a limited area and absorbent material to soak up the oil and/or large volume storage for oily water. You really need to contact a specialist company to do this properly, but if you just want to do as much as you can yourself what about those absorbent pads for "mopping up" small spills from workshop floors?

http://www.absorbentsonline.com/oilonlypadsrolls.htm

Kerosene is light oil and will disperse naturally reasonably quickly, especially if it is agitated by the wind.

Behemoth



Joined: 01 Dec 2004
Posts: 19023
Location: Leeds
PostPosted: Tue Mar 17, 09 3:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Sorry, I'll rephrase, if possible do it in a controlled manner and don't be a pillock. A bucket or something and then down the dump for oil/fuel disposal.

crofter



Joined: 11 Feb 2007
Posts: 2252

PostPosted: Tue Mar 17, 09 4:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Behemoth wrote:
Sorry, I'll rephrase, if possible do it in a controlled manner and don't be a pillock. A bucket or something and then down the dump for oil/fuel disposal.


Although you could try a raindance!

Foghorn



Joined: 23 Nov 2004
Posts: 49
Location: Barcombe, E Sussex
PostPosted: Tue Mar 17, 09 8:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

The cavalry has arrived!

Scratch what I said earlier about the Environment Agency - apparently, their customer contact centre (why do they bother with these?) made a slight error when they said it was not really their business.

Someone turned up and they are investigating the source of the spill as well as assessing the clean up operation. They will do it apparently, and charge us (or neighbours!). Nice to have some professional help with this.

We went to sleep with the sound of dripping oil and awoke to the sound of enforcement powers being brandished!

<Blows smoke off gun barrel emoticon>

naturalsols



Joined: 14 Jan 2014
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Tue Jan 14, 14 8:57 am    Post subject: Best course of action......Sorry it's late! Reply with quote    

Sorry this is too late for your question but if someone else stumbles upon this with a similar problem it may help them!

The best course of action was to ring the environment agency immediately to report the spill. However you should have rung 0800 80 70 60 which is the incident hotline not the general number, incidental the reason the person who answered so so ill informed is due to budget cuts the EA can only hire temporary staff on 6 month contracts so it is likely the person who answered the phone was new to their job.

Presumably the EA cleaned up the spill and charged your neighbour for the privilege under the polluter pays principle (whoever IS RESPONSIBLE for the spill has to pay for clean up costs, which is usually very expensive). If you are looking to conduct the clean up operation yourself e.g. you had the spill into your own pond and may not be able to afford a professional spill responder or the EA then i would suggest using oil absorbents.

The lucky thing about oil spills into water (as opposed to chemical spills) is that oil floats meaning it will not emulsify and become a large toxic mess. As it floats clean up of oil is simplified as you can skim it off the surface, i would suggest an oil selective, hydrophobic oil absorbent which will absorb the oil but not the water. If you have one which floats on the surface e.g. http://naturalsols.co.uk/catalogue_0_3_zorb.html leave it for half an hour then skim off the surface with a fishing net/swimming pool net and the majority of the oil should be gone. Even if you clean up the oil yourself i would highly recommend informing the EA but letting them know you have dealt with the spill and let them decide whether to come and investigate.

Hope this helps

gregotyn



Joined: 24 Jun 2010
Posts: 1956
Location: Llanfyllin area
PostPosted: Tue Jan 14, 14 3:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I worked for a large steel using company who had lots of booms in case anything should try to escape from the premises, we used lots of oils and all fairly toxic. It would be fairly simple to tie a boom across an area and pull it slowly across the polluted water and effectively skim any oil off. We had lots of exercises and they did the job. Any of the ppe type companies would supply, best of luck with the problem, then hang your neighbour!

camaro



Joined: 31 Mar 2010
Posts: 178
Location: N. Ireland
PostPosted: Tue Jan 14, 14 3:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

You can dump a load of straw on the surface, drag it round a bit - it'll absorb the oil. Then rake it out, let it dry, and burn it off... had to the same on my neighbour's pond when their tank leaked.

onemanband



Joined: 26 Dec 2010
Posts: 1473
Location: NCA90
PostPosted: Tue Jan 14, 14 6:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Some relevant information about when a tank should be bunded
http://www.ciphe.org.uk/Global/Student%20Study%20Section/Oil%20storage%20regs.pdf

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