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Slate kitchen worktops
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gz



Joined: 23 Jan 2009
Posts: 6439
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
PostPosted: Sun Jan 16, 11 8:27 am    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

linseed oil needs thinning a little, otherwise it can get very sticky, very quickly
I always use boiled linseed oil.

I can't remember what I thinned it with, but it was a natural product.

Brownbear



Joined: 28 May 2007
Posts: 14929
Location: South West
PostPosted: Sun Jan 16, 11 8:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Anyone who lacks either an enormous slate slab, or the thousands necessary to buy granite or slate worktops, can easily create a good-looking and inexpensive alternative.

Take two thicknesses of 18mm plywood, laminate them together with PVA, then fit them to the tops of your kitchen units. Tile the top with slate flooring tiles, grout with an appropriate hue of grout, then when it's nearly dry, polish the grout very well with a slightly moist cloth. Fix a bit of hardwood to the front of the surface as an edging, and seal the tiles with an appropriate product.

Cost a couple of hundred at the most, looks great, very durable surface.

gz



Joined: 23 Jan 2009
Posts: 6439
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
PostPosted: Sun Jan 16, 11 8:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

a good idea if you can get slate flooring tiles smooth enough.

Brownbear



Joined: 28 May 2007
Posts: 14929
Location: South West
PostPosted: Sun Jan 16, 11 8:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

gz wrote:
a good idea if you can get slate flooring tiles smooth enough.


Just sort through them in the tile shop. You can also use the stone or terracotta ones if you prefer those.

T.G



Joined: 13 Sep 2009
Posts: 7280
Location: Somewhere you're not
PostPosted: Sun Jan 16, 11 5:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

We have a large slate mantel and fire surround – I realise this isn’t a work surface in a kitchen before any smart alec remarks.

But we’ve found the slate takes a really high level of heat, and marks considerably (white marks) when left with any standing water (like an over filled vase left by a well meaning visitor when I was ill). It also takes a lot of cleaning and is absorbent so sealing it really well with whatever product you locate would be advisable.

It is also something to consider but slate can chip, surprisingly easily, however there is a very good stone glue product which dries almost invisible and I know masons use it to repair small chips and bond stone together. So you can repair it.

Mutton



Joined: 09 May 2009
Posts: 1508

PostPosted: Sun Jan 16, 11 6:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Linseed oil
Think you might want to avoid that on a food preparation surface. I have a dim memory from re-enactment days of being told to avoid using linseed oil on our wooden bowls for food and to use an edible oil instead. You might want to check that.

Cathryn



Joined: 16 Jul 2005
Posts: 19830
Location: Ceredigion
PostPosted: Sun Jan 16, 11 6:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Thanks all. Useful advice.

wellington womble



Joined: 08 Nov 2004
Posts: 14968
Location: East Midlands
PostPosted: Sun Jan 16, 11 6:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

You can buy slate sealant for floor tiles. I love the stuff (himself wouldn't hear of it. He likes beige) It doesn't like red wine or lemon juice though - fizzzzzz.

And you can chalk note to yourself on it. Sounds ideal to me! I'm very jealous.

Cathryn



Joined: 16 Jul 2005
Posts: 19830
Location: Ceredigion
PostPosted: Sun Jan 16, 11 7:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I could leave lists.

wellington womble



Joined: 08 Nov 2004
Posts: 14968
Location: East Midlands
PostPosted: Sun Jan 16, 11 8:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I often do on the slate tablemats (brilliant idea - I think we nicked it off Cab, and it's slowly being adopted by everyone else I know!) and notes for himself.

And visiting children love drawing on it!

mochyn



Joined: 21 Dec 2004
Posts: 24566
Location: mid-Wales
PostPosted: Mon Jan 17, 11 10:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Lemon juice marks go quite quickly, though.

Ruralnaedowell



Joined: 11 Nov 2010
Posts: 121
Location: Welshpool
PostPosted: Mon Jan 17, 11 6:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Olive oil is good too

RichardW



Joined: 24 Aug 2006
Posts: 8432
Location: Llyn Peninsular North Wales
PostPosted: Mon Jan 17, 11 7:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Watch out if using veg / edible oils.

They can encourage moulds / go rancid.

I think they recommend non toxic mineral oils.

gz



Joined: 23 Jan 2009
Posts: 6439
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
PostPosted: Mon Jan 17, 11 8:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

that could be why I was told to use Boiled Linseed Oil

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 34721
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon Jan 17, 11 8:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Mr O wrote:
Cathryn wrote:
mochyn wrote:
I've got a slate work surface in the kitchen. It doesn't really stain. It was cut for me by the local monumental mason.


Oh thank you, I will remember that. We know our local one quite well.
It would be interesting to here what you can read on the underside.


choker

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