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Fruit I D Please ?
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gz



Joined: 23 Jan 2009
Posts: 6873
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
PostPosted: Fri Mar 11, 11 9:48 am    Post subject: Fruit I D Please ?  Reply with quote    

These looked like large Haws from a distance, but when I got close enough looked like Crab apples, and they are thornless. When I opened one the seed is not shiny like an apple pip and most seem to have just one.


Click to see full size image

I've de-stalked and frozen them, pending ID

Lorrainelovesplants



Joined: 13 Oct 2006
Posts: 6517
Location: Dordogne
PostPosted: Fri Mar 11, 11 10:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

One pip in centre would suggest not an apple....
Id plump for some sort of plum......get it?, get it?

gz



Joined: 23 Jan 2009
Posts: 6873
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
PostPosted: Fri Mar 11, 11 10:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

not a plum type pip, and it has a flower on the bottom end like an apple

Lorrainelovesplants



Joined: 13 Oct 2006
Posts: 6517
Location: Dordogne
PostPosted: Fri Mar 11, 11 10:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Are they rose hips?

gz



Joined: 23 Jan 2009
Posts: 6873
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
PostPosted: Fri Mar 11, 11 10:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

No, No thorns, and a proper tree- a bit like a Hawthorn, but also a bit like a Crabapple

Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Fri Mar 11, 11 10:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I'd guess they are one of the more unusual haws, i.e. Crataegus, that are grown. Some seem to have a large pip.

If you look at the PFAF site and search for Crataegus some of them have pictures that look similar, such as http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Crataegus%20douglasii

gz



Joined: 23 Jan 2009
Posts: 6873
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
PostPosted: Fri Mar 11, 11 10:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I've had a suggestion of Thornless Cockspur (not surprised they bred a thornless one!!).
The leaves are more Appley- will have to wait until the leaves break to check
http://gallery.nen.gov.uk/gallery717-.html

gz



Joined: 23 Jan 2009
Posts: 6873
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
PostPosted: Fri Mar 11, 11 10:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Do you think that they are edible?
If not appley I could mix them with the last of the 2010 apple crop

judith



Joined: 16 Dec 2004
Posts: 22789
Location: Montgomeryshire
PostPosted: Fri Mar 11, 11 11:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

gz wrote:
I've had a suggestion of Thornless Cockspur (not surprised they bred a thornless one!!).
The leaves are more Appley- will have to wait until the leaves break to check
http://gallery.nen.gov.uk/gallery717-.html


That looks very much like my mystery tree. I have never known what it is!

sarahloo



Joined: 01 Jun 2007
Posts: 125
Location: Reading, Berkshire
PostPosted: Fri Mar 11, 11 11:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I've also found fruits like these and thought they were probably some sort of sorbus species...

mochyn



Joined: 21 Dec 2004
Posts: 24581
Location: mid-Wales
PostPosted: Fri Mar 11, 11 11:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I was wondering about Chequers? Sorbus torminalis.

cab



Joined: 01 Nov 2004
Posts: 32429

PostPosted: Fri Mar 11, 11 11:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

So hard without having specimen in hand.

From the pic of the fruit I'd go witha Sorbus, but I'm afraid I can't say with certainty. Sorry.

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44533
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Fri Mar 11, 11 11:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

mochyn wrote:
I was wondering about Chequers? Sorbus torminalis.


Me too, but I thought they were more rounded, these are quite elongated

gz



Joined: 23 Jan 2009
Posts: 6873
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
PostPosted: Fri Mar 11, 11 2:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I think there are some a quarter of a mile from there, but I think research will be on hold until leaves break and flowers bloom-which if it is this, should be in May

otatop



Joined: 01 Jun 2005
Posts: 1425
Location: North London
PostPosted: Fri Mar 11, 11 5:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I saw some fruit like these earlier this week on a tree in the grounds of the Dulwich Picture Gallery. My gardening friend identified it as a wild service tree. From memory of a programme on R4 last year, the fruits are known as chequers and are good for jam and jelly making.

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