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PastPresentFuture



Joined: 03 Oct 2005
Posts: 21
Location: London
PostPosted: Tue Oct 04, 05 1:12 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

OK, I'm sure you have all seen the garden lanterns with white-light LED's in them. Simple premise, battery charges with solar power during the day, low power led bulb comes on at night. I disagree with jema on the point of LED bulbs being too dim, partly because I'm a disagreeable person and partly because its a subject I have given much thought to.

I used to live on a Narrowboat for about 3 years, on the boat I had a 12V lighting ring and 20w bulbs which meant I rarely had to run the engine in order to recharge the domestic battery. OK it was a very low light environment but I could still read without eyestrain and find things on the floor.

I have recently changed over to all LED lighting in my bedroom. 4 x 12v 1.5w 18 diode white spotlamps, which still provides enough light to read without eyestrain. At the moment I am running this off the mains but quite honestly I see no reason to run the lighting ring in any domestic household off of mains electricty any more. The lighting could all be a closed independent circuit with a couple of 12v heavy duty batteries being charged by wind and solar energy and using LED bulbs. These bulbs are rated for 30,000 hours average lifetime but I suspect they will operate far beyond this.

Already most local government departments are switching over to LEDs for traffic lights because the are super-efficient and will not need replacing nearly as often.

So in summary, you could easily turn your entire house into a big independent solar storage lantern and save the national grid loads of energy with a low maintenance system which would probably last for your lifetime and many subsequent lifetimes. If you find LED bulbs too dim add more to the system and make your walls an celings a light reflective colour. Plus if there is a power cut your lighting ring would be completely unaffected.

This is a far more ecologicaly sound and efficient method of lighting your home than flourescent bulbs which still rely on the national grid.

Sorry if this post covers ground thats already been covered, I haven't been able to read through everything here yet.

jema
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 26622
Location: escaped from Swindon
PostPosted: Tue Oct 04, 05 1:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I'd love to be able to agree about the Leds, but with 7 of them in the Kitchen, it was pretty hopeless.

But no doubt they will get better.

PastPresentFuture



Joined: 03 Oct 2005
Posts: 21
Location: London
PostPosted: Tue Oct 04, 05 1:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

What kind of LED's were you using jema?

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44159
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Tue Oct 04, 05 2:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

PastPresentFuture wrote:
What kind of LED's were you using jema?


I tried to find the website again the other day but it had disappeared, anyway i got some too and the light is probably 1/2 of a normal 12v halogen and it's very blue.

PastPresentFuture



Joined: 03 Oct 2005
Posts: 21
Location: London
PostPosted: Tue Oct 04, 05 3:06 pm    Post subject: Brightness concerns? Reply with quote    

I think the main problem here is that you are trying to integrate the LED bulbs into the existing lighting ring. The lighting ring in most households is not ideal for this type of bulb because there are not enough sockets. What I am suggesting is removing or bypassing the outmoded lighting ring altogether and replacing it with a new type of system. You can design a flexible lighting arrangement for comparitively little cost using components such as the Brite Strip seen here ; http://www.3dzled.com/interior.html The major cost of installing an effective and self powered lighting system would be the solar panels, wind turbine, batteries - recharge system.

The white and blue bulbs, as you say, have a blueish hue but there are red and yellow variants available which you can mix and match with.

I honestly believe this is the ultimate way forward in terms of a self-sustaining domestic lighting arrangement, that is until someone invents a jar which literally stores sunlight.

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44159
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Tue Oct 04, 05 3:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Yup, if we ever build a new house it'll be mostly LED, but to (sensibly) retro fit on our old house isn't worth it

jema
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 26622
Location: escaped from Swindon
PostPosted: Tue Oct 04, 05 3:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

tahir wrote:
PastPresentFuture wrote:
What kind of LED's were you using jema?


I tried to find the website again the other day but it had disappeared, anyway i got some too and the light is probably 1/2 of a normal 12v halogen and it's very blue.


I can't find the info either I'd agree on the blue tinge, but I think 1/2 is optimisitic. I am not sure I'd place it more than 1/3.

Res



Joined: 07 Apr 2005
Posts: 1172
Location: Allotment Shed, Harlow
PostPosted: Tue Oct 04, 05 4:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I have energy bulbs troughout the flat in every room plus one halogen over the kitchen sink. They are all the 40w equivent, I think they are 9w in real terms. They were a bit wierd to get used to at first because there is a delay from when you switch them on till they are at full power, like someone turning them on by a slow dimmer switch, but we are quite happy with them now and have not had any of them blow and we have had them nearly 2 years.

I might be tempted to use LEDs in the three lounge lamps we have on at night, two standard and one table lamp, as soft lighting and if the LEDs are not as bright as them, I would add at least one more but I dont think we could warrent the cost of converting over the solar/wind power in a privately vented place.

culpepper



Joined: 16 Dec 2004
Posts: 638
Location: Kent
PostPosted: Tue Oct 04, 05 4:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

We buy the 40w equivalent energy saving bulbs from ikea.Our whole house uses them,even the pantry and tumble drier cupboard.
They dont need replacing very often at all.I think we buy about 4 a year and there are at least 12 light fittings in our house.

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