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is catching fish to eat viable?
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rachelk



Joined: 25 Aug 2011
Posts: 99
Location: thrapston gardening foraging or preserving in the kitchen or eating of course
PostPosted: Sun Oct 09, 11 8:47 pm    Post subject: is catching fish to eat viable?  Reply with quote    

have lots of spare time and little money would it be viable for me to catch fish to eat does it take a long time to learn would it take me hours to catch any thing and does it cost a lot for licences rods et.
is coarse fish edilbe
i live close to a river and lakes.
many thanks

Jamanda
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 22 Oct 2006
Posts: 34886
Location: Devon
PostPosted: Sun Oct 09, 11 8:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Bebo does course fishing. Not sure if she eats it though. Carp was certainly eaten a lot in the past, and perch and pike. Zander are edible and introduced and nasty.

Bodger



Joined: 23 May 2006
Posts: 13487

PostPosted: Sun Oct 09, 11 9:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

At most course fishing venues, you'd get lynched for thinking of, let alone actually eating what you catch.
In general, you can eat any trout that you catch and to a much lesser extent these days, any salmon but it tends to cost quite a bit to get the required permissions to fish for them.
You don't say where you live, but the sea is a much better proposition. Up to press, its still perfectly free to fish from the shore and most of what you'll catch is eminantly eatable.

rachelk



Joined: 25 Aug 2011
Posts: 99
Location: thrapston gardening foraging or preserving in the kitchen or eating of course
PostPosted: Sun Oct 09, 11 9:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Northants furthest you an get from the coast. Whats the thinking with coarse fish are they in danger even the odd pike here and there would e a problem?

Bebo



Joined: 21 May 2007
Posts: 12541
Location: East Sussex
PostPosted: Sun Oct 09, 11 9:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I don't eat them. If you went to a carp fishing venue and knocked one on the head to eat it you'd probably be strung up from the nearest tree. If you are going to try anything, I gather perch are reasonably tasty and pike are edible, but have vicious pin bones that you have to be very careful with (easy to get stuck in the throat). There was a period in the 70's when perch were thin on the ground, but they've had a resurgence and you'll probably be able to catch quite a few of them.

T.G



Joined: 13 Sep 2009
Posts: 7280
Location: Somewhere you're not
PostPosted: Sun Oct 09, 11 9:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

For what it costs in rods, licences and learning you'd probably get more to eat from keeping a few meat rabbits.

Hairyloon



Joined: 20 Nov 2008
Posts: 14814
Location: Today I are mostly being in Yorkshire.
PostPosted: Sun Oct 09, 11 9:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Bodger wrote:
At most course fishing venues, you'd get lynched for thinking of, let alone actually eating what you catch.

So don't let 'em know your plans... It's not illegal, though do check the local rules.
Quote:
In general, you can eat any trout that you catch...

As long as they are not undersized.

And then of course, there are crayfish...

rachelk



Joined: 25 Aug 2011
Posts: 99
Location: thrapston gardening foraging or preserving in the kitchen or eating of course
PostPosted: Sun Oct 09, 11 10:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Don't think I could kill a rabbit I would have to look after it too.

Crayfish sounds promising i'll google it

Kenworth



Joined: 04 Apr 2011
Posts: 855
Location: Michigan
PostPosted: Mon Oct 10, 11 2:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

It doesn't have to cost big money to fish.

We used cane poles when I was a kid. They were about 12' long. Nowadays they come jointed like a two piece rod. Nothing technical about them, just watch where you whip the line.

If I found a place I wanted to fish and had no pole, a young sapling could serve the same purpose.

rachelk



Joined: 25 Aug 2011
Posts: 99
Location: thrapston gardening foraging or preserving in the kitchen or eating of course
PostPosted: Mon Oct 10, 11 6:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

apparently you can dangle a piece of bacon rind from a bamboo cane and a length of string sounds like me. think i'll give it a go.

Jamanda
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 22 Oct 2006
Posts: 34886
Location: Devon
PostPosted: Mon Oct 10, 11 6:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Just check that the area has the right kind of crayfish. It is illegal to catch the endangered native ones.

http://www.environment-agency.gov.uk/homeandleisure/recreation/fishing/38045.aspx

Hairyloon



Joined: 20 Nov 2008
Posts: 14814
Location: Today I are mostly being in Yorkshire.
PostPosted: Mon Oct 10, 11 7:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

rachelk wrote:
apparently you can dangle a piece of bacon rind from a bamboo cane and a length of string...

You may need a rod licence for that, but you may not need the cane.
You need a licence to trap them, but it's arguable that bacon & string is not a trap.
Jamanda wrote:
Just check that the area has the right kind of crayfish. It is illegal to catch the endangered native ones.

4,000 fine I believe.
Best thing to do is give your local fisheries officer a call.

RichardW



Joined: 24 Aug 2006
Posts: 8414
Location: Llyn Peninsular North Wales
PostPosted: Mon Oct 10, 11 8:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Hairyloon wrote:

And then of course, there are crayfish...


I think that the EA have now also started charging for a licence for the non native species.

rachelk



Joined: 25 Aug 2011
Posts: 99
Location: thrapston gardening foraging or preserving in the kitchen or eating of course
PostPosted: Mon Oct 10, 11 10:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

i'll need a rod licence for a cane, its classed as a rod. theres american cray fish further up the Nene not sure here though I need to find out. I need to have a go at catching and killing one though or a rod licence will be a waste.

Hairyloon



Joined: 20 Nov 2008
Posts: 14814
Location: Today I are mostly being in Yorkshire.
PostPosted: Tue Oct 11, 11 12:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

You could try it without the cane...

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