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Quince varieties
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Treacodactyl
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Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Mon Dec 26, 11 7:05 pm    Post subject: Quince varieties  Reply with quote    

Does anyone have any recomendations for quinces? We're not looking purely for the best flavour but for a plant that'll cope with being left to get on with it while producing a decent crop of usable fruits.

Also, does anyone know of anywhere that's selling quince plants faily cheeply?

tai haku



Joined: 17 Apr 2011
Posts: 472

PostPosted: Tue Dec 27, 11 10:06 am    Post subject: Re: Quince varieties Reply with quote    

Treacodactyl wrote:
Does anyone have any recomendations for quinces? We're not looking purely for the best flavour but for a plant that'll cope with being left to get on with it while producing a decent crop of usable fruits.

Also, does anyone know of anywhere that's selling quince plants faily cheeply?


My folks had a series of really good yields with a Meeches Prolific they put in about 7 years ago but then it suddenly keeled over last year. I've gone with Vranja cos I've heard good things about it. Mine were 19 a piece. I suspect you might get one slightly cheaper if you keep checking garden centres around you - it's the sort of thing they may end up with a couple of left hanging around.

lottie



Joined: 11 Aug 2005
Posts: 5059
Location: ceredigion
PostPosted: Tue Dec 27, 11 5:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I had a great crop this year from Meeches Prolific that has only been in a few years up a small hill in windy West Wales. Someone I know about half a mile away has one she's had for years and hers is fantastic---she ends up leaving fruit to rot for the wild life. I once tried one in Lancashire though and it curled up it's toes and died.

Bulgarianlily



Joined: 01 Jun 2008
Posts: 1667
Location: South West Mountains of Bulgaria
PostPosted: Tue Dec 27, 11 6:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Bare root quince trees are currently about 3 euros each here, are there any restrictions about importing fruit trees into the UK?

yummersetter



Joined: 26 Jan 2008
Posts: 3223
Location: Somerset
PostPosted: Tue Dec 27, 11 7:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I've bought mine from Reads Nursery, who have a good range, and good service, but aren't cheap. Agroforestry have lots, reasonably priced but sold out almost as soon as the list goes up. Walcots http://www.walcotnursery.co.uk/acatalog/quince-trees.html might be worth looking at.

lottie



Joined: 11 Aug 2005
Posts: 5059
Location: ceredigion
PostPosted: Tue Dec 27, 11 11:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I've bought my fruit trees from several different nurseries those mentioned and others in order to get the range of varieties I wanted and all o.k. but I bought 2 Quince from Blackmoor nurseries and they have grown very well. Meeches Prolific isn't meant to be as quick growing as Vranja and some others afaik but mine have been. I found the best value for trees I have been pleased with for quality and price recently has been the Thompson and Morgan end of year sale but it's pot luck about what they have left. I've recently bought plums from Deacons Nurseries where the trees they sent were excellent.

Paradise Regained



Joined: 22 Dec 2011
Posts: 63
Location: In a sand quarry
PostPosted: Wed Dec 28, 11 10:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I've just acquired my Mum's copy of The Garden (the Royal Horticultural Society magazine) Dec issue which has an article on Quinces (p64).

It lists 3 suppliers:
Agroforestry Research Trust, Devon, 01803 840776; www.agroforestry.co.uk
Keepers Nursery, Kent 01622 726465; www.keepers-nursery.co.uk
Reads Nursery, Norfolk; 01986 895555; www.readsnursery.co.uk

We have Vranja in our garden (poor, sandy soil) which is a good cropper once established.

Treacodactyl
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Joined: 28 Oct 2004
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 28, 11 10:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Thanks for the suggestions. I've done a bit of reading and, although they do seem to be quite vigorous trees, I've noticed a few people say their tree has died. We also had to throw out the ones we grew from seed as they were completely defoliated by blight and they also don't seem to like it too wet. Both of which might be a problem in a Westerly wet woodland situation - hence wishing to track down some really cheaply. I'm not sure it would be practical to import a couple from the EU, although we might have to give some consideration to that in future if we buy a large amount of trees for an orchard.

However, back to the woodland and my assistant has come up with a cunning plan. This year we'll buy some cheap (2 each) quince rootstocks and see how they do. If they die then it's not a huge loss and if they take and look healthy we can try grafting in future.

I think we'll do the same this year with our apples, plant some rootstocks and then try some grafting next year. We're looking at Blackmores for them.

Thanks for the reminders about ART, although it's early we need to sort out our order for next winter as he does seem to sell out early.

Treacodactyl
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Joined: 28 Oct 2004
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Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Wed Dec 28, 11 10:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Bulgarianlily wrote:
Bare root quince trees are currently about 3 euros each here, are there any restrictions about importing fruit trees into the UK?


Just being curious, would they be 1yr or 2yr old trees and grafted varieties or just bare rooted plain cuttings? Don't bother asking if you don't know I was just wondering if we're comparing like for like.

yummersetter



Joined: 26 Jan 2008
Posts: 3223
Location: Somerset
PostPosted: Wed Dec 28, 11 11:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I was just thinking about quinces from cuttings, too. After all, if pears and quinces are grown on quince stocks then they can't be too difficult to propagate. I've found this as an answer to a similar question on an american site Gardenweb,
Quote:
According to the 1888 edition of W. W. Meech's book "Quince Culture":

" Propagation by cuttings is probably the best method of multiplying quince trees. Cuttings of large branches are better than those of small shoots. The amount of wood seems to measure the vital force to form both roots and tops. From twelve to fifteen inches is a good length, enabling us to plant deeply, and so guard against drought.

The chief thing is to guard against the exhaustion of sap by evaporation until roots are formed. Facilities for regulating light, heat, air, and moisture with precision will enable us to succeed with a succulent cutting furnished with a few leaves. When the air is warmer than the earth, buds are excited more than roots; and when the ground is warmest, root growth is most excited. Hence the custom of burying cuttings inverted during the winter, to keep the bnds dormant while a callus is forming for the emission of roots.

Holding the cutting in the hole at the right depth with the left hand, pnsh the earth firmly against the cutting with the dibble, as yon would in planting a cabbage. For lack of such firming the earth there are many failures.

The fall, after the leaves have dropped, is generally preferred for taking the cuttings; but they may be taken much later. I have had some cuttings grow in the open air, which were made in May, after the trees were growing.

Root Cuttings a foot or so long are best prepared before the buds swell in spring. I have trees from pieces of roots cut off by the plow as late as June. Plant at an angle of about forty-five degrees, or as near as you can to their natural position. "


I have Meeches and Pineapple Quinces that could spare some wood if you wanted to try. I think that grown on their own roots they may be more trouble-free.

yummersetter



Joined: 26 Jan 2008
Posts: 3223
Location: Somerset
PostPosted: Wed Dec 28, 11 11:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

And it only seems courteous to link to the original
http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/load/propa/msg0808074317440.html

tai haku



Joined: 17 Apr 2011
Posts: 472

PostPosted: Wed Dec 28, 11 12:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Since we're talking quinces I just found this and was rather intrigued to learn Meech's Prolific (I'll start spelling the guy's name right now the earlier link has shown me the error of my ways!) is a) American and b) in the US Ark of Taste.
http://www.slowfoodusa.org/index.php/programs/ark_product_detail/meechs_prolific_quince/

yummersetter



Joined: 26 Jan 2008
Posts: 3223
Location: Somerset
PostPosted: Wed Dec 28, 11 12:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

That's an interesting article! II hadn't spotted the link between Rev Meech's book and our tree. It always increases my enjoyment of a fruit to know more about its history.

Treacodactyl
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Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Wed Dec 28, 11 5:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

yummersetter wrote:
I have Meeches and Pineapple Quinces that could spare some wood if you wanted to try. I think that grown on their own roots they may be more trouble-free.


Thanks for the details and the offer, I would like to try one day but only if you definitely have some spare wood. I also find the other information rather interesting although I'm trying to not get side tracked just yet and just get a few more cheap plants in before we start to do some serious research and planning.

Mind you, I did notice Martin's comments about the cultivar 'Krymsk' producing fruits sweet enough to eat fresh...

Sally Too



Joined: 14 Sep 2006
Posts: 2511
Location: N.Ireland
PostPosted: Wed Dec 28, 11 6:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Yummersetter.... I'd love to try rooting a stick or two of quince. I can Paypal you postage or perhaps do some sort of exchange - Redcurrant Rovada sticks perhaps? (Or do you have a wishlist I might help fulfil?)

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