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thickening stews for the crockpot
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Nell Merionwen



Joined: 02 Jun 2008
Posts: 16300
Location: Beautiful Derbyshire
PostPosted: Mon Jan 02, 12 5:50 pm    Post subject: thickening stews for the crockpot Reply with quote
    

any hints and tips?
I do love my crockpot but still find it hard to get a good thickness in stews and sauces.
Ma always seems to get it right but when questioned it seems she more or less cooks it on the hob and then just uses the crockpot to keep it warm. Surely that is defeating the object?

sally_in_wales
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 06 Mar 2005
Posts: 20809
Location: sunny wales
PostPosted: Mon Jan 02, 12 5:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

cornflour added at the last moment before serving if it looks thin? Thats how my mum always did it and its fairly foolproof, just a teaspoon of cornflour in a dash of water then add to the simmering potion 5 minutes before its needed.

Otherwise, a handful of barley will thicken up stews very nicely

sean
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 42130
Location: North Devon
PostPosted: Mon Jan 02, 12 5:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Lentils in the sauce?
Or cornflour as Sally suggested.

earthyvirgo



Joined: 24 Aug 2007
Posts: 7972
Location: creating prints in the loft, Gerlan
PostPosted: Mon Jan 02, 12 5:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

sally_in_wales wrote:
cornflour added at the last moment before serving if it looks thin? Thats how my mum always did it and its fairly foolproof, just a teaspoon of cornflour in a dash of water then add to the simmering potion 5 minutes before its needed.

Otherwise, a handful of barley will thicken up stews very nicely


I've found you can get away with the same measure of wholemeal plain or spelt, or even gram flour mixed with a bit of the cooking liquid and back into the pot is less floury than cornflour.

EV

Mustang



Joined: 15 Jul 2005
Posts: 768
Location: Sunny Suffolk
PostPosted: Mon Jan 02, 12 5:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

I use cornflour, and also my own dehydrated potato powder.

Cornflour is probably the simplest

oldish chris



Joined: 14 Jun 2006
Posts: 4148
Location: Comfortably Wet Southport
PostPosted: Mon Jan 02, 12 6:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Spuds, boiled for ages, cooled down and re-heated (in the stock).

gz



Joined: 23 Jan 2009
Posts: 7217
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
PostPosted: Mon Jan 02, 12 6:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

okra

Green Rosie



Joined: 13 May 2007
Posts: 10498
Location: Calvados, France
PostPosted: Mon Jan 02, 12 6:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

gz wrote:
okra



dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 39855
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon Jan 02, 12 6:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

continuous rather than batch is best

high carb roots

long boiled animal connective tissues

flours (butter and flour mixed together and stirred in in the last 20 mins is a rescue of stew )

arvo



Joined: 04 Dec 2006
Posts: 3321
Location: Somerset
PostPosted: Mon Jan 02, 12 8:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

I go for whatever flour's in the cupboard, chuck it in a tbs of water to make it liquid then bung it in stew and stir like heck till it thickens (else it can go lumpy).

Then I check and see what colour it is if I'm doing sauce or gravy and if its too pale, bung a dash of dark soy sauce in.

Bebo



Joined: 21 May 2007
Posts: 12586
Location: East Sussex
PostPosted: Mon Jan 02, 12 8:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

beurre manie

TTouch Homestead



Joined: 13 Oct 2011
Posts: 703
Location: Cardigan, West Wales
PostPosted: Mon Jan 02, 12 8:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

We have an American crockpot recipe book and it mentions using tapioca in almost every recipe. I was sceptical, to say the least but gave it benefit of doubt and it works -no frogspawn like stuff, it seems to sort of disappear

gz



Joined: 23 Jan 2009
Posts: 7217
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
PostPosted: Mon Jan 02, 12 8:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

arvo wrote:
I go for whatever flour's in the cupboard, chuck it in a tbs of water to make it liquid then bung it in stew and stir like heck till it thickens (else it can go lumpy).

Then I check and see what colour it is if I'm doing sauce or gravy and if its too pale, bung a dash of dark soy sauce in.


Mix it in a small bowl with a little cold liquid til smooth, then add some hot liquid, stir then mix in...less likelihood of lumps

12Bore



Joined: 15 Jun 2008
Posts: 9088
Location: Paddling in the Mersey
PostPosted: Mon Jan 02, 12 8:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Coating meat in seasoned flour before browning before slow cooking or casseroling usually works for me.

Katieowl



Joined: 01 Jun 2006
Posts: 4317
Location: West Wales
PostPosted: Mon Jan 02, 12 8:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Gravy granules...

or cornflour.

Kate

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