Home Page
   Articles
       links
About Us    
Traders        
Recipes            
Latest Articles
New hedging - what to plant?
Page 1, 2, 3  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Downsizer Forum Index -> Land Management
Author 
 Message
FOD1



Joined: 10 Aug 2007
Posts: 19

PostPosted: Wed Feb 29, 12 11:24 am    Post subject: New hedging - what to plant?  Reply with quote    

I've taken out an old Leylandii hedge (it was 20ft high by about 10ft at the base) and am not sure what to plant to replace it with.

The new hedge needs to provide the following in order of importance:
1. Privacy (neighbours are on higher land than us)
2. Fast growing
3. Wildlife friendly
4. Be a native species or mix of species

What do I need to add to the soil before planting the new plants?

Do I need to get the old tree stumps out before replanting - they're about 10"-12" diameter.

Does anyone know of any hedging nurseries in the south west which have mature hedges available to view?

Thank you!

12Bore



Joined: 15 Jun 2008
Posts: 9088
Location: Paddling in the Mersey
PostPosted: Wed Feb 29, 12 11:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

You should remove the stumps and add loads of compost/soil improver.
If you can, leave for a year for the ground to recover.
Beech?
Barberry if you want spikes?
Oregon grape?
http://www.ashridgetrees.co.uk Wincanton

FOD1



Joined: 10 Aug 2007
Posts: 19

PostPosted: Wed Feb 29, 12 11:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Thank you. Someone suggested eleagnus ebbingeii - is that any good? Is it faster than beech?

Went



Joined: 19 Mar 2006
Posts: 6968

PostPosted: Wed Feb 29, 12 11:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Getting the stumps out is not an easy task but you probably know that already. We disposed of a similar hedge when in the UK and without substantial equipment, they were impossible to move. In the end on one section we drilled holes in the stumps and painted on diesel which worked well and stop further growth. Not the most environmentally friendly solution but it worked well. We raised the soil level and replanted with Holly - within 5 years we had a great evergreen hedge.

Tavascarow



Joined: 06 Aug 2006
Posts: 8407
Location: South Cornwall
PostPosted: Wed Feb 29, 12 12:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

FOD1 wrote:
Thank you. Someone suggested eleagnus ebbingeii - is that any good? Is it faster than beech?

Eleagnus is evergreen & some have edible fruit.
I like beech for the way it keeps its russet colours through winter but unless you leave it to turn to a tree you wont get any mast to eat.
I like traditional natives like holly, hawthorn & blackthorn.

Bodger



Joined: 23 May 2006
Posts: 13510

PostPosted: Wed Feb 29, 12 2:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

If there are any, have a look at the local natural hedges and go with whats in them.

We started on our Leylandi last weekend but still have an awful long way to go. We got a mini digger in to take the stumps out of the last lot that we did.

Here are the pictures from last Sunday.

Plenty of sunshine and fresh air for us today.





























Yo Heavo!








Thankfully we managed to get the first and biggest of the row without demolishing the garden shed or the greenhouse. Believe you me, it was close run thing. wink.gif









The first part of the job done.





Went



Joined: 19 Mar 2006
Posts: 6968

PostPosted: Wed Feb 29, 12 3:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Sadly, Leylandii seem to be the hedge of choice in the few new houses that are built here - you can already see them as a potential problem for many.

Bodger



Joined: 23 May 2006
Posts: 13510

PostPosted: Wed Feb 29, 12 3:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Plenty and I mean plenty, of potential firewood for us in just over twelve months time.

FOD1



Joined: 10 Aug 2007
Posts: 19

PostPosted: Wed Feb 29, 12 4:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Blimey - yours was worse than ours - nightmare. I was surprised how weedy the petrol chipper we hired was - not really man-enough for the job but I couldn't hire a proper big one without the attached tree surgeon and his invoice.
Chippings piled up for a year before using?

Are you putting in a new hedge?

tonythetree



Joined: 25 Jan 2008
Posts: 16
Location: Worcestershire
PostPosted: Wed Feb 29, 12 4:59 pm    Post subject: Beech hedging Reply with quote    

Hi I have approx 40 Beech hedging plants 40-60cm you can have if you can pick em up They are left over from a planting job
We're in Worcestershire
Tony

FOD1



Joined: 10 Aug 2007
Posts: 19

PostPosted: Wed Feb 29, 12 6:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Hi Tony
I've just PM'd you - thank you

Mutton



Joined: 09 May 2009
Posts: 1508

PostPosted: Thu Mar 01, 12 12:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

For fast growing native - willow. Weave it as a screen as well.

FOD1



Joined: 10 Aug 2007
Posts: 19

PostPosted: Fri Mar 02, 12 7:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

The ground needs to be wet for willow doesn't it? My patch is south facing on sandyish soil.

Tavascarow



Joined: 06 Aug 2006
Posts: 8407
Location: South Cornwall
PostPosted: Fri Mar 02, 12 8:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

FOD1 wrote:
The ground needs to be wet for willow doesn't it? My patch is south facing on sandyish soil.

They wont survive an extended drought but don't need to be soaking wet either.
If you have got light sandy soil you might have to give them a drink once in a while.

Marches



Joined: 13 Dec 2011
Posts: 171
Location: Nr Peak District, England
PostPosted: Thu Mar 29, 12 10:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I'd personally plant Holly or Hornbeam.

Post new topic   Reply to topic    Downsizer Forum Index -> Land Management All times are GMT
Page 1, 2, 3  Next
Page 1 of 3
View Latest Posts View Latest Posts

 

Archive
Powered by php-BB © 2001, 2005 php-BB Group
Style by marsjupiter.com, released under GNU (GNU/GPL) license.
Copyright 2004 marsjupiter.com