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Truvia.

 
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Nell Merionwen



Joined: 02 Jun 2008
Posts: 16300
Location: Beautiful Derbyshire
PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 12 9:02 am    Post subject: Truvia.  Reply with quote    

I've just seen this advertised
Now, without wanting to have a debate or lecture about aspartame, I was wondering what the catch is with this as a sweetener. As some of you know, I am trying really hard to be a reasonable wedding dress size. I miss cake and poor old BA is going into withdrawl Lord knows how he survived before he met me and discovered galaxy chocolate cake.
I avoid aspartame like the plague as it does seem to react badly with me. It makes my throat itch and makes my joints ache. I am fully aware that this is possible due to fibro.
It seems Truvia is simply the derivative of the stevia plant. Where is the catch?
Anyone had an experience of this sweetener?
And to cap it off where is the stevia sourced from? What are the ir miles of this particular product?

marigold



Joined: 02 Sep 2005
Posts: 12458
Location: West Sussex
PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 12 11:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Not answering you question, but I make my cakes using ground almonds, gluten-free flour, eggs and fruit. No sugar or sweetener at all and you only need a very small piece to satisfy a cake craving.

DawnMK



Joined: 01 Dec 2008
Posts: 895
Location: Buckinghamshire
PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 12 12:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

very very sweet, 1/3 is like a teaspoon of sugar, 0 calories, but also very expensive, it does have a bit of an aftertaste, I bought some stevia seeds and having a go at growing my own, the leaves are very sweet.

toggle



Joined: 30 Dec 2006
Posts: 11622
Location: truro
PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 12 12:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

stevia is good, but expensive in the branded forms that you buy in shops. it is, according to the other half, the closest thing he's had in an artificial sweetener to sugar.

but, only thing you know is sweetners can still set off cravings for carbs. wish i'd had time to look more into this, but apparently they are worse if you're already overweight and it takes up to 6 months after loosing weight for that to normalise.

and compared to a lot of things, you don't need to worry too much about milage, it's a dried leaf. very light, very strong sweetness in the leaf. afaik, even if you were a heavy user, the impact of importing this would be less than for a couple of cuppas.

Nell Merionwen



Joined: 02 Jun 2008
Posts: 16300
Location: Beautiful Derbyshire
PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 12 12:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

so, does the cost off set the small amount you need?

toggle



Joined: 30 Dec 2006
Posts: 11622
Location: truro
PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 12 12:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

nope, still a lot more expensive.

Nell Merionwen



Joined: 02 Jun 2008
Posts: 16300
Location: Beautiful Derbyshire
PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 12 12:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

ah

Nell Merionwen



Joined: 02 Jun 2008
Posts: 16300
Location: Beautiful Derbyshire
PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 12 12:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

ooh, it's half price in tesco

Mustang



Joined: 15 Jul 2005
Posts: 768
Location: Sunny Suffolk
PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 12 1:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Stevia as a sweetener has been used for centuries in Asia and other places.

It's pretty easy to grow yourself. Dry the leaves, grind them up and use them natural.

Or you could steep them in water to extract out sugar, and use the syrup to sweeten things? Not tried this myself yet .... just thinking how it could be done.

.

hardworkinghippy



Joined: 01 Jan 2005
Posts: 1110
Location: Bourrou South West France
PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 12 2:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Nell, as far as I know there's no catch - as Mustang says it's been used for centuries.

It's easy to grow, take cutting from (roots in water) and very easy to care for and you can keep a plant for a very long time if you can overwinter it in a windowsill or conservatory.

I use it all the time as a sugar replacement - except when a recipe needs that burnt crunchiness or the conservation properties of sugar. It's brilliant with rhubarb, the flavours seem to go so well together.

I've written a lot about it in my blog.

http://lafermedesourrou.blogspot.fr/search?q=stevia

Irene

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