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What is your Favorite wood for burning?
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Mr O



Joined: 13 Feb 2005
Posts: 5512
Location: Nova Scotia, Canada
PostPosted: Sat Apr 27, 13 12:19 am    Post subject: What is your Favorite wood for burning?  Reply with quote    

I am an Ash fan, good wet or dry, Oak is great but takes so long to season, Maple and Birch here are plentiful but burn fast, Beech has just about died out, then there are the evergreens, Spruce, Pine and Balsam, ( hemlock is rare ), they all burn hot and fast.

OtleyLad



Joined: 13 Jan 2007
Posts: 2737
Location: Otley, West Yorkshire
PostPosted: Sat Apr 27, 13 4:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

When we moved here there was a big old pear tree that was dying. Cut it down and after 2 years seasoning it burns hot as coal on the open fire with a nice smell too.
We use it at christmas.
Still got some big chunks of it left-not quite sure what i'm saving it four.

mousjoos



Joined: 05 Jun 2006
Posts: 1984
Location: VERY Sunny SW France
PostPosted: Sat Apr 27, 13 6:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Best here is Beech/Oak mix but Oak has to be at least a year drying or is crap

Ash is good, but better mixed with Beech

RichardW



Joined: 24 Aug 2006
Posts: 8433
Location: Llyn Peninsular North Wales
PostPosted: Sat Apr 27, 13 6:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

As long as it is properly dry I dont care.

It is nice to have a mix so you can get a boost of fast heat using a soft / light wood & then add some hard / dense wood for a longer burn time between re loads.

vegplot



Joined: 19 Apr 2007
Posts: 21298
Location: Ynys Môn
PostPosted: Sat Apr 27, 13 7:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Not spoiled by the availability of choice or indeed quantity my favourite at the moment is Scots pine as we have some, is extraordinarily easy to light, and burns very well.

Bodrighy



Joined: 15 Aug 2008
Posts: 2157
Location: Near Devizes
PostPosted: Sat Apr 27, 13 7:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Logs to burn! Logs to burn!
Logs to save the coal a turn!
Here’s a word to make you wise
When you hear the woodsman’s cries.

Beechwood fires burn bright and clear,
Hornbeam blazes too,
If the logs are kept a year
And seasoned through and through.

Oak logs will warm you well
If they’re old and dry,
Large logs of pinewood smell
But the sparks will fly.

Pine is good and so is yew
For warmth through wintry days
But poplar and willow, too
Take long to dry and blaze.

Birch logs will burn too fast,
Alder scarce at all.
Chestnut logs are good to last
If cut in the fall.

Holly logs will burn like wax,
You should burn them green,
Elm logs like smouldering flax,
No flame is seen.

Pear logs and apple logs,
They will scent your room.
Cherry logs across the dogs
Smell like flowers in bloom.

But ash logs, all smooth and grey,
Burn them green or old,
Buy up all that come your way,
They’re worth their weight in gold

Went



Joined: 19 Mar 2006
Posts: 6968

PostPosted: Sat Apr 27, 13 7:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Free, failing that Oak or Eucalyptus both very dry.

Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Sat Apr 27, 13 8:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

The oak I collected free from a large fallen tree burnt well, as the tree was half dead I expect it was half seasoned and thus burnt well after just another year of seasoning. It has a pleasing smell and sound in an open fire.

I've also been impressed with some Scots Pine trimmings I've been burning in an outdoors fire while working, it burns well and for longer than I would have expected.

Alder is pleasant to cook over but burns quickly. Goat willow also burns surprisingly well but doesn't smell that nice.

Ash would be my wood of choice for a wood burner and I expect in a couple of years there will be quite a bit available for firewood if you have the room to store it.

bulworthy project



Joined: 27 Jun 2011
Posts: 188
Location: Rackenford, Devon
PostPosted: Sat Apr 27, 13 12:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Beech and hornbeam are our favorites but they make great charcoal so we usually end up filling the woodburner with oak and softwood.

Ty Gwyn



Joined: 22 Sep 2010
Posts: 4247
Location: Lampeter
PostPosted: Sat Apr 27, 13 1:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Hawthorn and Blackthorn.

Nicky Colour it green



Joined: 25 Jun 2007
Posts: 8697
Location: Devon, uk
PostPosted: Sat Apr 27, 13 1:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

whatever is free/available

we burn a fair bit of pallet wood. We have a lot of hazel and ash in the hedges, we were given a lot of leylandii - even that burns ok if seasoned long enough

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 35422
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sat Apr 27, 13 2:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

ash
any prunus
oak,
chestnut
any pinus

most will burn ok if prepared well,dead standing is pre seasoned and only needs a bit of drying

some greenwoods are almost flameproof

one of the easiest to light is knots from rotted pine stumps and for a brew fire they are ideal for boiling pines for heating and roasting hardwoods as a general rule

super hot should be fuelled with dry oak and chestnut

blackthorn is adaptable from fast burn twigs to charcoal burn from log, as an all rounder ash or blackthorn

bog oak is a coal hot slowburner if dried

peat is rather nice but a bit smelly and wont get very hot without bellows

beware eucalyptus ,it can be a bit exiting in small bits especially the leaves

gil
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 08 Jun 2005
Posts: 18379

PostPosted: Sat Apr 27, 13 7:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Beech
Ash
Sycamore

and Oak is very good if properly seasoned, but the first three are what is good round here.

judith



Joined: 16 Dec 2004
Posts: 22789
Location: Montgomeryshire
PostPosted: Sat Apr 27, 13 9:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Beech definitely.
Oak good, but doesn't often appear in the wood I buy.
Fruit trees of various sorts.

But it is all about the mix. I currently have some beautifully seasoned wood that burns too quickly. It needs some soggy birch or summat to go with it.

Jamanda
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 22 Oct 2006
Posts: 34918
Location: Devon
PostPosted: Sat Apr 27, 13 9:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Agree you need the mix. We currently have a good lot of oak which is great once the fire is established, but there's a bit of cherry (I think) mixed in to get it going.

Last year's bay prunings make great fire lighters!

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