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gregotyn



Joined: 24 Jun 2010
Posts: 1461
Location: Llanfyllin area
PostPosted: Sat Sep 30, 17 9:27 am    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

MR I went to the post office this morning to buy a stamp and lost it in the process of driving 500 yards up the road to the library-such is life. I will get another on the way back and do the necessary. I am going to check how much the local shop sells his logs for and price accordingly. My aim is, if it takes off, quickly to saw a tree or so down which are growing in the wrong place, and as I have said I have a few that would need permission, but not all and professional help. I know how to fell trees, I did it with conifers-hardest work I ever did-but the hardwood felling is a whole different ball game, weight distribution and so on. I may be buying another tractor soon, a friend has told me someone has one for sale and IF the timber takes off then I will need a method of hauling the logs around to the seasoning and selling point. The poor old Fergy has died, only suitable for spares, so they who know tell me. All depends on how this lot of logs sell.
I have another friend who with wife and baby haven't got enough to buy firewood so I am going to help out there too. Think it is the baby who gurgles and doesn't cry when I hold her as most little ones do-its the beard that upsets most I am told. I need a bonfire soon, lots of rubbish at my place to go in around 5/6 weeks.

I may undersell myself MR, think it is because I don't do the limelight-preferring to be in the background out of the way.

Good to be able to give food parcels out with some size to them, MR, I suppose during the year things get a bit on the sparse side at times. I am afraid I don't do the date test-I do the granny system of using the nose!

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 9005

PostPosted: Sun Oct 01, 17 6:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I usually have a book of stamps and a purse in a handbag to keep them in, otherwise I would probably lose my stamps too Gregotyn. Sorry to hear the Fergie is dead; they are collectors items now, so might be a good idea to get a friend to advertise it on e-bay or something for you, you might get rather more for it than breaking for spares. Someone with time and money might even restore it.

I use the smell and look of food too, but because we are giving things out, and because there has been so much official denigration of food banks, we need to be seen to be correct in every way. We have to have a proper referral and make sure everything we give out is 'in date'. Outside of that, we try to be as helpful as possible, so ask what people like/don't like, if they prefer tea or coffee, if they have pets etc. and try to give them a bit of choice. We may be the first people they have come across that care and want to help rather than the official view that seems to be to assume they are scroungers regardless of why they need help.

Did a bit of sorting and hand splitting of logs for more log sacks yesterday and found a couple of interesting fungi in the woods, which I will post about in Conservation.

cassandra



Joined: 27 Mar 2013
Posts: 1535

PostPosted: Sun Oct 01, 17 7:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

The officials denigrating the food banks would be better doing a bit themselves to prevent the need for food banks - the very cheek of them!

We had snow yesterday - woke to melting snow and shortly after another fall arrived to top it all up again. It was all gone by lunchtime, but nice to see some decent snow at last! Albeit a little late in the day what with it being mid-spring.

Today I decorated the History Room window once more and this month's theme is 'A woman's work is never done' featuring a rather horrible old washing machine that required manual effort - operating a lever that plunges a cone up and down over the wash to provide agitation, a kerosine heated iron (I think you call it something else - white spirits? - it's used in children's steam engines etc).

Also a selection from my button box, an old sewing machine, my 1922 recipe book and a shopping basket full of plastic fruit. Oh and my lace collection with some ricrac and braids as well.

No doubt i will receive bitter feedback from my critic who will claim to remember what they did in Victorian days, haha.

Now I am home I have my feet up as a day sitting in the sun has made me rather sleepy. Add to that the introduction of Daylight Savings and I am ready to nod off I think.

gz



Joined: 23 Jan 2009
Posts: 5913
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
PostPosted: Sun Oct 01, 17 7:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

don't you believe them gregotyn,Fergies live forever!!
it will be mendable.....

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 9005

PostPosted: Mon Oct 02, 17 6:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Sadly according to some politicians, food banks are only used more because people know about them, and all who use food banks should be out finding a job/getting a better one. Don't think some of them have ever worked properly in their lives.

I have seen your window on FB and it looks good. Even in the 1950s, when the sewing machine dates from, my mother was spending a lot of time on housework, making clothes for herself and me and generally doing a fair bit. Think she managed to get out most afternoons, so not as bad as it had been in the past, but still doing odd jobs in the evenings like hand jobs on the dressmaking though. She didn't knit unless she really had to, so it wouldn't have been knitting in the evenings.

We went up to the woods again yesterday afternoon to keep an eye on things. I made a spoon out of some hawthorn and had a wander about round our yard looking for fungi. Found quite a lot, most unidentified, but found one I think could be a death cap or near relation. Haven't looked it up yet, but almost certainly one of that family. Weather was very misty, although as it was clearer at home, we may have actually been in the cloud in the woods. The trees were catching it and kept dropping it on us though.

gregotyn



Joined: 24 Jun 2010
Posts: 1461
Location: Llanfyllin area
PostPosted: Tue Oct 03, 17 1:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Sadly, some of the old Fergies die gz, cos the owners 'go', the next generation don't want them, and they get snapped up by the breakers. I will have a go at the friend who is the fitter and see if he will get time to start it-well get it out of the trees, literally. And at least give me a price to take it apart and have a "Look See".
Anyway I have bid on another tractor without seeing it yet and worse I don't know what type it is, the folly of age! It comes with the provenance that it belongs to a relation of my new neighbour, whose family are renowned for being straight, that it goes and is complete with a plough-I would prefer a log splitter-but there we go-I can make one of them if I am the successful bidder. Impulsiveness is my middle name, well it is when I want something.

In many ways it is a shame that the Haves in politics, national and local, are not subjected to poverty for a week, ie they have the basics and nought else, and have to find rent and feed themselves for said week; they would I am sure have difficulty managing. I think the dignitaries think that every one can work with a pick and shovel, or can use a computer, or stand up for an 8 hour shift, with only 40 minutes of breaks, and timed lavatory stops! When I worked on presses it was very hard; some of the steel sheets were almost impossible to handle by one man. The best was a job that was hard to do, then had its base target put up at break time so you had to do the extra target and 60% for a bonus for eight hours, but in 6 hours that shift-I was that operator! I can tell you the man who ran the dole office in Welshpool should have been sent to that factory and made to do a shift at just target and forget bonus.

A woman's work may never be able to be done, Cassandra, but neither is mine, the consolation is that I can sit whichever side of the fireplace I choose!

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 9005

PostPosted: Wed Oct 04, 17 6:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

As things like that are increasing in value because they are becoming rarer, therefore collectors items, it might be worth while seeing what you can do Gregotyn. Son went to a repair place the other day and they were rebuilding a VW camper that apparently was found in a hedge. Son said it looked as if the hedge was growing through it. Now worth at least £10k because of rarity.

The weather was lovely here yesterday. Sunny with a light wind, but didn't seem to dry the grass very well. I sorted out some birch for besom heads, and as an extra the thicker stuff I cut out of it can be used for kindling. Then sorted out some logs from the log store and filled some more log nets, so a productive day. Husband and son did firewood loads, so getting through them reasonably well. We had an order from another customer for log nets; 100 before Christmas and 50 after, which is good. We will be delivering the first 50 later this week with any luck, then back to filling them again.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 9005

PostPosted: Thu Oct 05, 17 7:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Just went shopping yesterday, but ended up with a couple of noticeable happenings. First was that rather than the old scanner system where you pick one up by using a Nectar card then give the scanner to the cashier and pay for your stuff, Sainsburys have decided on a new system for which you can only use a debit or credit card. I prefer to pay in cash, so that means I can't use it. Explained to 2 staff why I was rather displeased, and will be writing to Sainsburys on subject too. Woman in front of me said she would use Tesco delivery service now. So one customer definitely lost and one seriously thinking of going to the opposition. Good home goal Sainsburys.

On the way home came round a corner to see a car in the hedge with the air bags still smoking. Parked up a side road and well out of the way and went back to help the lorry driver that was going over to see what happened. Four older people in the car, which had just gone across the road and hit a tree (trees always seem to attract cars when in hedges). Women in the back seemed injured, but men in front just a bit shocked. The lorry driver had called an ambulance which was very prompt, and while they dealt with the injured, I kept the driver from wandering in the way and into the road. Waited until the police arrived, then left the emergency services to it. They were very good. Thank goodness for them.

gregotyn



Joined: 24 Jun 2010
Posts: 1461
Location: Llanfyllin area
PostPosted: Thu Oct 05, 17 1:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Since I lost the wallet I haven't bothered with nectar points, and also since I work in town I go to whichever takes my fancy' or what I want. I went to all 3, Sainsbury, Tesco, and Morrissons yesterday to get what I wanted. different things from them all. Basically I buy what I want. We have an Aldi too, but I don't often go there although not too bad as a shop, but it is a queue to get to the tills; well whenever I go it is, so I only when I have the time to spare. I think that is more than an own goal, could end their presence in Welshpool as there is 3 alternatives all from the one big car park. Sainsbury is tucked at the top of the town, and they won't stay if the sales drop. This would kill the top of the town.
Thank goodness you were at the accident, MR; the older you get the more calming you need, I find.
I will be getting the tractor looked at for spares or repair. I saw the neighbour yesterday and he didn't mention the tractor for sale so I guess I have missed it. I might have a look round and see what is about. Not the time of year to be buying a machine when I haven't got a shed to house it in! All my places are in use right now after the move. I will have to have a sort out, I can't possibly all the rubbish I have in the time scale I have, do I need a tractor-log splitting? There are some good hand operated machines available, but hard work too. I have seen one where you lift a wedge and it drops down and splits the wood, but is it good enough to split logs! It would do kindling but a twisted grain log may be a problem. I enquired about a new small 4wd tractor we have at work about 35-40hp. but it is too much, £16,000.
Your orders are coming in thick and fast for the logs MR, but I guess you will still have to go out on Christmas Eve. for the last minute brigade.
I am glad the wherewithal arrived, thank you for your help.

Jam Lady



Joined: 28 Dec 2006
Posts: 1737
Location: New Jersey, USA
PostPosted: Thu Oct 05, 17 9:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Finally something suitable for Downsizer

On Tuesday some of the garden club ladies and I went to the research station where we picked peaches in the summer. This time it was Grimes Golden apples and Asian apple pears. The food bank was given 1,125 pounds of fruit.



We were also allowed to pick some apples and apple-pears for ourselves, and a medley of tomatoes. Last night I made Marcella Hazen's fresh tomato sauce and still have lots of tomatoes. Green tomatoes too, so probably chow-chow in my future.



I was allowed to pick some crab apples. Yesterday I made crab apple butter slow-cooked in the oven. One batch spiced with cinnamon & cloves, another batch with cardamom & nutmeg.

I also was allowed to pick Iron Mountain peaches, a pre-1900 white fleshed variety with very delicate flavor that yes, ripens this late. More than Mr Jam Lord and I can eat fresh. Trying to decide whether to freeze or can.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 9005

PostPosted: Fri Oct 06, 17 7:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Nice to hear from you Jam Lady. How are your family getting on now. Hope they have been able to get back home and not too much damage.

That sounds like a good haul for both you and the food bank. What are the Asian apple/pears like, as although we can get Asian pears, I have never bothered with them. I have found I like Comice pears, but very few others, so tend to stick to them.

If you have some peaches to spare, perhaps not such good ones, try peach brandy; it is lovely, but don't add much sugar as it is very sweet.

It would be useful to have a shed or something to store a tractor in before you buy Gregotyn. We keep ours under tarps as we don't have a shed at all, but not ideal. I think you would find any of the log splitters either slow or hard work. There are some manual hydraulic ones, some horizontal that you 'pump up' that might be less hard work, but very slow. We have a log splitter for the little tractor, but most of ours is done in the firewood processor. I do kindling by hand, but am very slow.

Our supermarkets tend to be spread round the edges of towns, so not very convenient to swap. You have to make a conscious decision sadly. I will be going to Morrisons today to pick up a prescription for husband and some coffee bags for me, as Mr. Sainsbury has let me down there yet again.

Delivered 50 log sacks yesterday with husband. It was a bit of a job too as son is away, and we had to load 50 between the truck and trailer, unload and stack them under display benches at the other end. Tired both of us out rather. I don't like to accept I am getting a bit older, but when we do something like that, realise I am perhaps not as physically able as I was years ago.

gregotyn



Joined: 24 Jun 2010
Posts: 1461
Location: Llanfyllin area
PostPosted: Fri Oct 06, 17 1:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Good to 'speak' to you again Jam Lady-hope you and his Lordship are well and the problems of the south affecting your family are ok now or at least on the mend as we say here. The affluent don't seem to realise what it is to be at the bottom of the pile. I was on the dole for a year and it is no fun, less than £200 a month when I was there. I had saved all my life so no hardship for me, but I would have gone to the food bank if I had needed to. I fell on my feet anyway with another job which at part time gives me £200/week and with my pension I am comfortable financially, not rich, but ok and still doing the job 10 years on.

All our super markets in Welshpool are within a stone's throw of the town centre 3 close to each other, Sainsburys who are at the top of the town are a little bit further, but not too far to be able to walk easily.

I won't be around tomorrow as I am going to see a "fallen" barn in north Wales in the national park there. A friend has bought it with a view to making it into his final retirement property-he is on his third one already, but this one looks rather a daunting project to me from the photos. However he has applied for a part of it to become a 2 bedroom property using about a third of the building. Half has already fallen down and he wants to utilise some of that. It looks a lovely spot, but too close to a main road for my liking, but I will let you know on Tuesday. I suppose at my age a main road means they can get you out easier if the weather is bad and you need recovering!

Jam Lady



Joined: 28 Dec 2006
Posts: 1737
Location: New Jersey, USA
PostPosted: Fri Oct 06, 17 2:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Re: log splitters - in the distant past Mr Jam Lord used to split wood by hand with a sledge and wedges. When we moved here and he was felling and splitting trees on our own property he bought a used gasoline-powered hydraulic log splitter. And when that became worn out he bought a new gasoline-powered hydraulic log splitter.

It is mostly used in horizontal orientation but can be shifted to vertical for logs too large to lift onto the cradle.

He prefers to work at a steady pace rather than a hectic one.

It would seem that the choice of equipment depends on how much needs to be split, the size of logs to be split, how small you want to break them down, and what type of wood. As I'm sure you all know hickory is gnarly and resistant, ash easily falls apart.

Jam Lady



Joined: 28 Dec 2006
Posts: 1737
Location: New Jersey, USA
PostPosted: Fri Oct 06, 17 3:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Mistress Rose, Asian apple pears are very juicy when ripe, with a somewhat crisp texture and pleasant flavor. Being nothing like an apple or a pear they really need a different name.

The research farm has several varieties, which ripen at somewhat different times. We were told to look for trees with fallen fruit and then pick from those.

Some are quite large.


Re: pears - it depends on what I want to use them for. Bosc, the brown / russet ones, are very good for baking or for the pear cranberry chutney I like for Thanksgiving. Bartlett are nice for eating out of hand but very tender / damage easily. The little Seckel pears are nice for eating and also preserved whole in lingonberry jelly. I could get fresh lingonberries in New York City, now substitute cranberries.

gz



Joined: 23 Jan 2009
Posts: 5913
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
PostPosted: Fri Oct 06, 17 7:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Jam Lady, how do you do Apple Butter in the oven ?

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