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Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 33850
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Sat Sep 21, 13 9:42 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

No, I've been there within 2-3 years. We haven't owned it much longer. I don't remember it specifically, but it's not a big garden, so it wouldn't have been very unruly.

I'll check the agreement and see.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 9958

PostPosted: Sun Sep 22, 13 7:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

If the sewers are old, it is possible for beech roots to get in. A large copper beech made a takeover bid for the sewer at our first house before we moved into it, but was cleared and the sewer replaced. The house and sewer were put in about 1870 though. If it is a modern plastic and unjointed sewer, then far less risk.

Hairyloon



Joined: 20 Nov 2008
Posts: 15026
Location: Today I are mostly being in Yorkshire.
PostPosted: Sun Sep 22, 13 7:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Nick wrote:
No, I've been there within 2-3 years. We haven't owned it much longer.

If she's been there a year and a bit, and you've not been there for 2-3 years, then that's longer... and if you're anything like me, then the 2-3 years you remember may actually be 3-4.
And it is often surprising how much a hedge can grow in a couple of years.
Quote:
I don't remember it specifically, but it's not a big garden, so it wouldn't have been very unruly.

If it's not a big garden, then it can't be a big hedge, so it shouldn't be a big deal either way.

Hairyloon



Joined: 20 Nov 2008
Posts: 15026
Location: Today I are mostly being in Yorkshire.
PostPosted: Sun Sep 22, 13 7:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Mistress Rose wrote:
If the sewers are old, it is possible for beech roots to get in. A large copper beech made a takeover bid for the sewer at our first house...

This is a hedge, not a tree.
Point being that when you trim the shoots, the roots tend to die back to match.

Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 33850
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Sun Sep 22, 13 8:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

House is less than thirty years old.

Kariana



Joined: 21 Aug 2013
Posts: 122

PostPosted: Sun Sep 22, 13 8:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Whatever your agreement says I think you should ask your agent to go round and take a picture of the hedge do you can see it for yourself. Also they should speak to the neighbour about their concerns for the sewers. Perhaps if they've been there a long time they have more reason for their concern, or perhaps the hedge has caused problems before.

As for what state the hedge was in at the beginning of the tenancy, usually the agent would have some pictures that they used to advertise the property so perhaps you could look at those for comparison. If the hedge was particularly high at the start and would require a ladder to cut down then I don't think it's really fair to expect the tenant to either do this or pay for it. On the other hand if it was originally a reasonable height and they've let it get out of hand you could do it this once but make it clear that it's their responsibility to keep it in check in future and if it isn't maintained at the end of the tenancy you will deduct it from their deposit.

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