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Brush cutter or strimmer
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Piggyphile



Joined: 02 Apr 2009
Posts: 891
Location: Galicia
PostPosted: Tue Jun 24, 14 1:02 pm    Post subject: Brush cutter or strimmer  Reply with quote    

I have finally admitted to myself that I can't cope with our land without the help of a petrol based machine. I have been using a scythe and garden shears and failing miserably. The land has a mix of brambles, long grass and bracken between waist and shoulder high.

Brands I am looking at include Stihl Husqvarna or Makita. Some reviews have said that long grass tangles around brushcutters blades. I want a bike handle to allow for better steering round trees.
Some have interchangable heads. I want something decent as it will be used a lot. There are also some multi tools out there but I worry they won't do anything properly.

Does anyone have any recommendations or experience with these things? Will a strimmer clear brambles? Will a brush cutter do long grass?
Thanks

Lorrainelovesplants



Joined: 13 Oct 2006
Posts: 6495
Location: Dordogne
PostPosted: Tue Jun 24, 14 1:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Stihl or kawasaki.
The problem with strimmers is
1. hard to start
2. Take some time to service properly so most people dont bother.

As long as you get something under 5 years old you will be able to source parts, and remember to change the fuel - preferably empty out old petrol at end of season and fill with fresh the following spring.
Weve had 6 in this week - all old fuel problems - I dont care Im earning.

Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 33800
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Tue Jun 24, 14 1:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

A brush cutter will do most things, including nettles and grass. I had a Stihl, the smallest petrol one, and the strimmer head was more effort than reward, but the brush cutter was great. I now have a larger, Honda one, and only use the brush cutter. Nettles, brambles, grass, small ash trees, anything that gets in the way.

bibbster



Joined: 17 Apr 2009
Posts: 1233
Location: Just a bit inland from Aberaeron
PostPosted: Tue Jun 24, 14 1:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

From personal experience, (and the scratches to prove it!) a strimmer will NOT clear brambles, you need a brushcutter head for that. Once tamed, going over with a strimmer will keep the weeds down.
I have just returned an Einhell Strimmer/Brushcutter after about 4 or 5 hours use as the strimmer head came apart whilst in use..
I also found that particular one very heavy, so that is worth being aware of

Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Tue Jun 24, 14 1:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

What problems do you have with the scythe? I've got an Austrian 50cm ditch blade and after a quick sharpen it seems to fly through anything; thick grass, docks, small trees, brambles and even thumbs when I got careless.

vegplot



Joined: 19 Apr 2007
Posts: 21297
Location: Ynys Môn
PostPosted: Tue Jun 24, 14 2:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I've had a Honda brush cutter for about 10 years. Very reliable, servicing so far has comprised of changing the oil every year. It's a 4 stroke so no oiled plugs or fussy 2 stroke engines or oil/fuel mix. Not as a powerful as a 2 stroke but as it starts very easily and aside from a drop of oil has cost nothing in maintenance.

http://www.honda.co.uk/garden/brushcutters/UMK435UE/

Piggyphile



Joined: 02 Apr 2009
Posts: 891
Location: Galicia
PostPosted: Tue Jun 24, 14 2:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

My main issues with the scythe are very uneven ground, and my unfitness which includes arthritic knees. The grass cuts okish but brambles seem to tangle up in it and even after sharpening I need to use a big swing which is knackering. There seem to be some mighty tussocks which take 3 or 4 swings to get through and it gets bloody hot here and I have hay fever despite anti histamines.

Pathetic I know, I use a ditch blade but the amount of effort required to cut a small area puts me off doing it. The brush cutter hangs from a harness so you don't feel the weight and I am hoping it will require physically less effort.

Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 33800
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Tue Jun 24, 14 2:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

vegplot wrote:
I've had a Honda brush cutter for about 10 years. Very reliable, servicing so far has comprised of changing the oil every year. It's a 4 stroke so no oiled plugs or fussy 2 stroke engines or oil/fuel mix. Not as a powerful as a 2 stroke but as it starts very easily and aside from a drop of oil has cost nothing in maintenance.

http://www.honda.co.uk/garden/brushcutters/UMK435UE/


I have something almost the same, and would make the same post.

RichardW



Joined: 24 Aug 2006
Posts: 8423
Location: Llyn Peninsular North Wales
PostPosted: Tue Jun 24, 14 3:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

A professional sized strimer will handle brambles. Think 3mm 4mm or 5mm line less than 3mm is for home use.

A straight shaft is essential if you will ever fit a blade instead of a line head.

Hairyloon



Joined: 20 Nov 2008
Posts: 14915
Location: Today I are mostly being in Yorkshire.
PostPosted: Tue Jun 24, 14 4:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

They have a good looking strimmer/brushcutter in Aldi at the moment for £99...
I was thinking to offer to test it for them and write a review...

Rob R



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 31902
Location: York
PostPosted: Tue Jun 24, 14 4:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Lorrainelovesplants wrote:
Stihl or kawasaki.
The problem with strimmers is
1. hard to start
2. Take some time to service properly so most people dont bother.

As long as you get something under 5 years old you will be able to source parts, and remember to change the fuel - preferably empty out old petrol at end of season and fill with fresh the following spring.
Weve had 6 in this week - all old fuel problems - I dont care Im earning.


Really? Who in their right mind leaves fuel in a strimmer over winter? I've only ever used the stop button on a strimmer a handful of times in my life, usually the juice just runs out.

Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 33800
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Tue Jun 24, 14 4:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Not everyone has to strim the whole of yorkshire, of course.

Rob R



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 31902
Location: York
PostPosted: Tue Jun 24, 14 4:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    


stumbling goat



Joined: 20 Jan 2009
Posts: 1976

PostPosted: Tue Jun 24, 14 5:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Brambles, lots of brambles to deal with, then consider a hedge trimmer?

Use it like a knife slicing through the brambles left to right and up and down. Clear the debris with a fork. Then cut along the base as close to ground level as you can. A petrol lawn mower ion a high setting will deal with what remains. It has worked for me anyway. So is possible, and an option to consider.

sg

Rob R



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 31902
Location: York
PostPosted: Tue Jun 24, 14 5:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

stumbling goat wrote:
Brambles, lots of brambles to deal with, then consider a hedge trimmer?


Or a flame thrower?

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