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a more fun question about top fruit
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yummersetter



Joined: 26 Jan 2008
Posts: 3221
Location: Somerset
PostPosted: Wed Aug 12, 15 9:33 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

With more enthusiasm - good stuff.

Delicious and special apples amongst the 175 trees growing here:
Red Melba, Rev Wilkes cooker, Fortune, James Grieve (an essential pollinator), Red Windsor, Oaken Pin, Pitmaston Pineapple, Peasgood Nonsuch cooker, Orleans Reinette (russet), Queen Cox, Kidd's Orange Red, Blenheim Orange, our local Somerset Golden Russet. These are in order of ripening.

Plums - Early Transparent, Kirkes Blue, Yellow Mirabelle, Greengage.

Cherries - rarely eaten any as the birds here are fanatic cherry stealers - Vega and Merton Glory worked their unripe loooking fruit trick for one year but the pigeons now know their worth.

Pears - Concorde, Shinseiki, Jargonelle.

I recommend Roy Genders ' Planting Fruit Trees', well out-of-print but sold for pennies online, I think the last edition was in the 1980s.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 35422
Location: yes
PostPosted: Wed Aug 12, 15 11:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

thanks

the more info i can absorb the better.

i recon there will be a few russets even if we only add a few new apples and the orleans renette has had a few recommendations:lol: a couple of good cooker types might be a good idea as well so i will check out the options

i still cant identify the existing apple type the only one that seems to match all of 50 odd criteria in an online id key is Esopus Spitzenburg but although it is possible from the age of the trees (over a century at a guess)it seems a bit odd that a hospital orchard in york was planted with a usa variety from the 18th c

i hadnt realised there were about 7000 named varieties until very recently

OtleyLad



Joined: 13 Jan 2007
Posts: 2737
Location: Otley, West Yorkshire
PostPosted: Thu Aug 13, 15 5:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

dpack wrote:
thanks

the more info i can absorb the better.

i recon there will be a few russets even if we only add a few new apples and the orleans renette has had a few recommendations:lol: a couple of good cooker types might be a good idea as well so i will check out the options

i still cant identify the existing apple type the only one that seems to match all of 50 odd criteria in an online id key is Esopus Spitzenburg but although it is possible from the age of the trees (over a century at a guess)it seems a bit odd that a hospital orchard in york was planted with a usa variety from the 18th c

i hadnt realised there were about 7000 named varieties until very recently


If you can take apples (plus a few leaves) to an Apple Day 27-28th September at RHS Harlow Carr, Harrogate there will be people there who can identify them (some at 100 paces!). I did just the same when we first moved here (we inherited a few unknown trees with the house). You can meet the Northern Fruit Group there too.

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