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A Years Cookery

 
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GrahamH



Joined: 23 May 2015
Posts: 431

PostPosted: Sat Sep 12, 15 9:39 am    Post subject: A Years Cookery  Reply with quote    

I have always enjoyed cookery books and one of my favorites dates from 1879......



It has for each day of the year a suggested menu for breakfast, luncheon and dinner. Sunday menus list breakfast, dinner, tea and supper.
Included is how to cook, the marketing for the day and the tomorrow and also 'things that must not be forgotten'.

Todays entry......



If you can't make out the photo,
Breakfast....Eggs on the dish, bath chap, teacakes, dry toast, brown and white bread and butter and plum porridge.

Luncheon....Rabbit gateau, suet dumplings with jam.

Dinner....Croute au pot, stewed chicken with tomatoes and mushrooms, potato snow, cabbage, apple pie, cheese.

One of the items in todays things not to forget is.....soak a large cupful of hominy in cold water all night.

The dates after the dish tells where the recipe details are listed. Anyone need the recipe to bath chaps?

Last edited by GrahamH on Sat Sep 12, 15 10:11 am; edited 1 time in total

Piggyphile



Joined: 02 Apr 2009
Posts: 891
Location: Galicia
PostPosted: Sat Sep 12, 15 10:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Yum but a full time job to cook it all. I assume there were staff.

GrahamH



Joined: 23 May 2015
Posts: 431

PostPosted: Sat Sep 12, 15 10:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Hi Piggyphile,


According to Phyllis......

I have specially addressed myself to people of moderate income with moderate domestic help.....

One of the pieces of kitchen utensils she suggests is a hair sieve.






It is a book I can pick up and read a couple of pages of then put down but I also use some of the recipes.

Lorrainelovesplants



Joined: 13 Oct 2006
Posts: 6514
Location: Dordogne
PostPosted: Sun Sep 13, 15 5:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

what is "Bath Chap"?

GrahamH



Joined: 23 May 2015
Posts: 431

PostPosted: Sun Sep 13, 15 6:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I too had no idea.
It's pickled pigs cheek. If it's been dried after being pickled it would need to be soaked for 2 hrs; if straight from the pickle it can be cooked after a rinse.
Boil for two and a half hours, draw off the skin, cover with bread raspings and set before the fire for 5 minutes.
So Lorraine, are your pig cheeks dried or still in the pickle jar?

We used to have pigs cheek when I was young, not pickled though. My mother called it 'chuck'.

Lorrainelovesplants



Joined: 13 Oct 2006
Posts: 6514
Location: Dordogne
PostPosted: Sun Sep 13, 15 9:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

yuk!

Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 34031
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Sun Sep 13, 15 10:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Cheeks are delicious. One of the least appreciated cuts.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 35900
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sun Sep 13, 15 3:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

very yumm .

peasant cured with dry sea salt for a while at the top of the tub until they have lost about half the water ,a quick soak in clean water and

slice and fry like bacon(add the rest of breakfast as you go along)
or
dry ,slash,cook in hot oven for crackling with a meaty middle
or
slow cook in a big pot of root veg .

bath chaps are ace (dont google that )
all the best aspects of porcine yummywonderfulness in a single portion sized cut

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 35900
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sun Sep 13, 15 3:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

when im "doing a pig" the chaps get chosen as a snack long before the bacon so im a bit unsure about how it would dry .

as each chap is quite small with a big surface to volume ratio salting and drying times are quite short ,i expect so is shelf life .

Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 34031
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Sun Sep 13, 15 4:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

If I cook them, it's long slow and sticky. Works well with cow face, too. If I cure them, I use half sugar, half salt, with lots of pepper for an Italian style bacon.

jettejette



Joined: 01 Jun 2013
Posts: 225

PostPosted: Wed Sep 16, 15 8:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Gorgeous book! I suppose no central heating or mod cons meant that people needed a bit more 'fuel' for energy in the way of food than we do now.
Certainly a book to treasure!

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