Home Page
   Articles
       links
About Us    
Traders        
Recipes            
Latest Articles
SD's new house, the practical stuff
Page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Downsizer Forum Index -> Finance and Property
Author 
 Message
dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 33631
Location: yes
PostPosted: Fri May 04, 18 9:03 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

plenty is done
some stuff is part done

once most of it was drying out the other issue became clear and has been sorted by mending the drain gully and fitting channel drains to stop a lot of water getting in

at last they decided that the kitchen floor was beyond saving
the last few days of digging and filling has been heavy work but as a bonus i have a 25mm dry riser for a new water feed in which is good as the lead pipe with a dead leg is functional but far less than ideal


the original tiled floor in the hallway should be ok as it has had a fair bit of "stabilisation" . doing the conservation stuff under a floor that could be replaced for a few K is a matter of taste, mine , the material are cheap but the labour is not.
once it gets a decent acid peel and a nice wipe with some makeup it will be very pretty and quite a architectural rarity as most get skipped due to the condition of em.

as far as i can see once the concrete is in, tomorrow uggghhhh, i recon we are out of first fix in every department.
most of second fix is carpentry with a bit of plastering and the 3rd fix stuff to get it to fit to move into and re-mortgageable is significant but quick and relatively cheap

35 cu meters out , 15 metric tons in at a very rough guess by the end of the refurb:roll:

the number of little and larger issues caused by bad historic decisions in a job like this makes me think that getting one that is very messy and getting back to basics rather than trusting the last hundred years or so of "improvements" is a good strategy
for instance i would not consider a new or second hand house without a full rewire or thorough eyeball from a trusted spark
gas can have issues, just blank the meter and re pipe
etc etc etc

i will do photos and a proper write up when it is done.

sean
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 41835
Location: North Devon
PostPosted: Mon May 07, 18 6:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

dpack wrote:


the number of little and larger issues caused by bad historic decisions in a job like this makes me think that getting one that is very messy and getting back to basics rather than trusting the last hundred years or so of "improvements" is a good strategy
.


We were the third owners of our 1912 house in Motspur Park, buying it from the lady who'd bought it in 1927. It had had central heating installed and some secondary glazing. Was a dream to sort out, rewire, new boiler, new kitchen and a towel rail.

This one in Devon has been hacked about by a string of morons over the years. We're going to have to spend some serious dosh in the next couple of years sorting it.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 33631
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon May 07, 18 8:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

ummm, tis rather like that sometimes.

the structural part of the slab is 100/125 mm thick in 2 ballast/2 grit/1 ordinary with a bit of waterproofer laid on visqueen over lots of compacted hardcore, gravel and sand and i have a 25mm dry riser in mains water pipe routed under it

the screed needs an undetermined but significant amount of volume, it would be rather fun to do it in 1/4 inch to dust shiny granite and snowcem with a power float finish
if the price differential is not too horrid i might surprise em just for fun

spose what might get spent on concrete now gets saved on less permanent flooring over a lifetime, not my lifetime but i can see them having their grandkids round

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 33631
Location: yes
PostPosted: Tue May 08, 18 5:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

fancy concrete is too expensive so more half ballast half sharp sand to fill 75 mm or so and then topped with lots of sharp sand and float work lying on a ladder

the surface profile is a tad challenging as the 1970's extension floor slab is about 30 mm higher than the lower part of the hallway tiles which are charming but have a rather concave and now stabilised shape
i need to decide on the best way to connect the fixed points and shapes, mostly flat and level is good for a kitchen

Post new topic   Reply to topic    Downsizer Forum Index -> Finance and Property All times are GMT
Page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5
Page 5 of 5
View Latest Posts View Latest Posts

 

Archive
Powered by php-BB © 2001, 2005 php-BB Group
Style by marsjupiter.com, released under GNU (GNU/GPL) license.
Copyright 2004 marsjupiter.com