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gregotyn



Joined: 24 Jun 2010
Posts: 1718
Location: Llanfyllin area
PostPosted: Thu Jul 26, 18 2:37 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

To minimise any chemical use, sgt., you could use a weed wipe glove and so target only those weeds you have/want to get rid of and don't respond to being pulled or dug up. There are times when you have to bite the bullet, however against principles it may be. If you have horsetails then chemicals are the answer....or move!

I have been lucky with my gardens in the houses I have lived in, in that my predecessors have all been good gardeners!

You are looking good in such a short space of time.

sgt.colon



Joined: 27 Jul 2009
Posts: 6150
Location: Just south of north.
PostPosted: Wed Aug 15, 18 1:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Thanks Gregotyn.

I'm looking at edging my beds with wood and I've been looking at gravel boards. Are these safe where food stuff is being grown with what they have been treated with? If not please could someone recommend what type of wood would be best to use? I've also considered pallets.

Thanks.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 9978

PostPosted: Thu Aug 16, 18 6:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

It depends on how long you want them to last. I would ask what the gravel boards have been treated with. I think they are down to about copper now if they are treated softwood, and it doesn't work. Expect about 2 years life. Oak, chestnut or western red cedar are probably the longest lived ones without treatment, but make sure they are completely heartwood; the sapwood decays quite quickly.

sgt.colon



Joined: 27 Jul 2009
Posts: 6150
Location: Just south of north.
PostPosted: Thu Aug 16, 18 8:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Thanks MR. It doesn't say on the B&Q website what they are treated with. If you have a look on the internet it just say's they are pressure treated.

Can you buy those sorts of wood in the shops do you know?

Thanks.

Edit:- I found this on one website.

Quote:
Tanalith E green or brown

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 34203
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu Aug 16, 18 10:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

my treated floor joist planter is about 10 yrs old and showing a little decay in places.

i lined it with 1000gm/m polythene to separate the soil from the timber treatment.

it seems to have worked ok.

gregotyn



Joined: 24 Jun 2010
Posts: 1718
Location: Llanfyllin area
PostPosted: Thu Aug 16, 18 2:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Once they say pressure treated it implies that cca has been the chemicals used-well it did when I was young and sent on a course to run a treatment plant-stood for copper, chrome, arsenic. Not my ideal now but guess we didn't know much different when I was on the course 40 years ago. Our company was in line to buy one of their treatment plants for 200k. The course was good but the treatment lethal to most things including the operator and all bugs. If I were to use treated timber today I would cover it in polythene to reduce the risks to my plants, bugs and me. Today's treatment I am told is much reduced in potency. It is too many years for me to remember all the details, but probably available on the net somewhere. I have just read the dpack post so it looks as though it works with the polythene barrier. I am repeating it all as I hadn't read Mistress Rose's post either-sorry.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 34203
Location: yes
PostPosted: Fri Aug 17, 18 12:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

in the days of tributyl tin, copper arsenate and lindane i had an nbc mask, nitrile gloves and plastic clothes

a really simple way to raise a bed level is to just pile it up and grow stuff on the sides

gabions or hurdles are options, coppice or otherwise based

a line of turf wall will raise a bed every new layer.

how long the edges last is not as important as does the soil escape ( too much ) and how deep can i get this ( carrots ummm yummm )

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 9978

PostPosted: Fri Aug 17, 18 6:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Yes, treatment used to be cca, but over the years they have removed the chrome and arsenic. Better for the operators and those using it, but doesn't work as far as longevity of the wood is concerned. There is some wood that is heat treated that is supposed to last longer, but not used it, so I would still go with the woods that have natural resistance. If you can protect the wood from the soil it helps, but maybe not so practical for a raised bed. I wouldn't expect a hazel hurdle type edging to last more than a few years if it was in contact with the soil, but if you just use it as a surround, then longer.

sgt.colon



Joined: 27 Jul 2009
Posts: 6150
Location: Just south of north.
PostPosted: Fri Aug 17, 18 11:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Thanks all.

I think I'm going to have to put a little thought into it. I'm only doing it to make it look nice and neat and to have something for my paths to butt up to.

I'm trying to acquire some used paving slabs off Freecycle.

sgt.colon



Joined: 27 Jul 2009
Posts: 6150
Location: Just south of north.
PostPosted: Wed Sep 19, 18 10:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Has anyone ever moved a greenhouse before? I'm going to collect one in a couple of weeks and I'm just trying to figure out the best way to transport all the glass?

Thanks.

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44144
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Wed Sep 19, 18 11:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

We took ours down in 2010, we haven't got round to putting it back up

sgt.colon



Joined: 27 Jul 2009
Posts: 6150
Location: Just south of north.
PostPosted: Wed Sep 19, 18 11:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    



Do you think you'll ever put it back up? Have you not missed it? That might be a silly question eight years on.

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44144
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Wed Sep 19, 18 11:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I'd love to, but still busy at work and the orchard takes a lot of time too. Dunno, but we really miss not having a veg plot

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 34203
Location: yes
PostPosted: Wed Sep 19, 18 11:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

lots of time
good gloves
eye protection is wise ( pinging clips / glass issues )

bucket dustpan and brush . box ( for any broken sheets )

wd40 ( owt tight get squirty cos brute force breaks glass )
long nose pliers, waterpump pliers,mole wrench, screwdrivers.
hammer, drift, back block ( for punching out rusted bolts )

other tools may include, drill/bolt croppers/angle grinder with cutting disk ( if the bolts are properly rusted solid )

unclip glass, ( there are a few types of clip all of them fun so take a variety of pointy pokey tools ) The clips may try to escape , be vigilant and pop each in the bag as they come off ( replacements might be hard to source ), don't lose the bag

wrap glass in newspaper ,
tape into manageable parcels .
transport parcels layered with cardboard and secured in vehicle

most are easy but go equipped for rusted fixings just in case it ain't good marine stainless

ps use marine quality bolts if replacing any , fertilizers etc are as corrosive as sea water

sgt.colon



Joined: 27 Jul 2009
Posts: 6150
Location: Just south of north.
PostPosted: Wed Sep 19, 18 12:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Thanks for all that DPack, very useful.

Ahhh that's rubbish not even have a little veg plot Tahir. I feel sad for you.

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