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Which apples, pears, plums?
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tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44143
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Tue Mar 27, 18 6:36 am    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

Jamanda wrote:
Don't forget damsons!


best flavoured one s Farleighs, but what a FAFF to pick and process, they're tiny. Its the kind of plum that's used in a lot of middle eastern/north Indian cooking. generally you dehydrate whole and then add a few to a curry or biryani.

Merryweather is much better picking/pruning wise (Farleigh's becomes an impenetrable mess) but is sweeter and less intensely flavoured.

mallard is a good plum to use instead of tomatoes in curries, the best lamb curry I've ever made was with Mallard plums

Fee



Joined: 21 Mar 2005
Posts: 15902
Location: Surrey Heath
PostPosted: Tue Mar 27, 18 7:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Oooh!

gz



Joined: 23 Jan 2009
Posts: 6326
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
PostPosted: Tue Mar 27, 18 9:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Fee wrote:
There was an old quince growing in the scrub across from our old house, I don't believe anyone else knew what it was, we didn't to start with either, it was a bit treacherous to pick any fruit off it but it did make delicious jelly.


Would taking a cutting make sense? Could always be grafted....

Nicky Colour it green



Joined: 25 Jun 2007
Posts: 8693
Location: Devon, uk
PostPosted: Tue Mar 27, 18 11:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I like Keepers Nursery website, gives good info on seasons, pollination pairings, rootstock,
uses etc.

Fee



Joined: 21 Mar 2005
Posts: 15902
Location: Surrey Heath
PostPosted: Tue Mar 27, 18 1:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

gz wrote:
Fee wrote:
There was an old quince growing in the scrub across from our old house, I don't believe anyone else knew what it was, we didn't to start with either, it was a bit treacherous to pick any fruit off it but it did make delicious jelly.


Would taking a cutting make sense? Could always be grafted....


It would if it weren't now 180 miles away

Fee



Joined: 21 Mar 2005
Posts: 15902
Location: Surrey Heath
PostPosted: Tue Mar 27, 18 1:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Nicky Colour it green wrote:
I like Keepers Nursery website, gives good info on seasons, pollination pairings, rootstock,
uses etc.


Ooh, that is good!

gz



Joined: 23 Jan 2009
Posts: 6326
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
PostPosted: Tue Mar 27, 18 2:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Fee wrote:
gz wrote:
Fee wrote:
There was an old quince growing in the scrub across from our old house, I don't believe anyone else knew what it was, we didn't to start with either, it was a bit treacherous to pick any fruit off it but it did make delicious jelly.


Would taking a cutting make sense? Could always be grafted....


It would if it weren't now 180 miles away


friends near to it?

yummersetter



Joined: 26 Jan 2008
Posts: 3218
Location: Somerset
PostPosted: Tue Mar 27, 18 3:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Its safe to windowshop the Agroforestry site now https://www.agroforestry.co.uk/product-category/plants/top-fruit as they've sold out. Its very good for making the brain spin with new fruit and nut ideas, though as they are based on the South Coast of Devon they might be more optimistic about hardiness than you need where you'll be.
Starting with the idea of growing what you can't buy properly ripened, I'd think about buying an Asian pear from them, I grew Shinseiki and it was nice, juicy and crunchy - wood was a bit brittle and I lost half the tree in a freak storm but I think we were unlucky there. You should plant Doyenne du Comice, you may only get a few fruits and then you have to get the timing perfect on ripening, but if you do, it'll be the most delicious fruit you've ever tasted.
Plums - Mirabelle de Nancy Kirkes Blue and a Japanese plum - they'll all benefit from a sunny sheltered place though.
Apples - Scrumptious, Kidds Orange Red, Orleans Reinette and Peasgood Nonsuch . . . though you have time to research what is recommended in your area.

gz



Joined: 23 Jan 2009
Posts: 6326
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
PostPosted: Tue Mar 27, 18 3:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Although nurseries further South are good, I'd look for something more local or at least of similar climate.
Possibly one growing older varieties so more likely to be doing it themselves instead of,like many, just buying in.

I don't know whats near your new home, but I'm sure someone on here will

Fee



Joined: 21 Mar 2005
Posts: 15902
Location: Surrey Heath
PostPosted: Tue Mar 27, 18 4:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

gz wrote:
...

friends near to it?


Good point, I should at least tell them it's there and what it is!!

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 34191
Location: yes
PostPosted: Tue Mar 27, 18 6:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

for a fairly hardy old school variety of apple it is hard to beat tom putts , triple use variety
cookin then cookin or eating then cookin or eatin or cider as the harvest matures

they do need another group 3 type to pollinate them but the ones i know seem to be long lived ,heavy cropping and vermin resistant even when neglected

from what i recall cheshire is a bit damper and warmer than york but they should be ok.

something to consider is wind, if it is sheltered you have lots of choices, if windy especially when in leaf and you have a soft soil it might be best to go for smallish trees or even cordon grown stuff rather than big stuff


re naming favourites i have a slight problem in that most of mine are from late 19th/ early 20 th C stock and we haven’t found names for most of the best ones yet. not knowing a name is no barrier to taking grafts though

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 9976

PostPosted: Wed Mar 28, 18 6:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Think there is still a place you can get apple trees identified, but can't remember which of the former fruit places it was. May now be private, so may have to pay a small fee, but worth looking into.

Fee



Joined: 21 Mar 2005
Posts: 15902
Location: Surrey Heath
PostPosted: Wed Mar 28, 18 7:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

dpack wrote:
not knowing a name is no barrier to taking grafts though


True that

Behemoth



Joined: 01 Dec 2004
Posts: 19020
Location: Leeds
PostPosted: Wed Mar 28, 18 8:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

There’s probably some sort of local ‘apple group’ with access to old local varieties. Check which ones are edible though.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 34191
Location: yes
PostPosted: Wed Mar 28, 18 10:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Mistress Rose wrote:
Think there is still a place you can get apple trees identified, but can't remember which of the former fruit places it was. May now be private, so may have to pay a small fee, but worth looking into.


we know a few id experts but they are stumped with about half of the ancient varieties dotted around york

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