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derbyshiredowser



Joined: 11 Feb 2007
Posts: 831
Location: derbyshire
PostPosted: Thu Mar 28, 19 8:44 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

dpack wrote:

running does not help with some of the forrin onesl:


I know they are not forrin but it always surprises me how quick hedgehogs are .

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 35422
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu Mar 28, 19 10:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

four short legs but they can cover the ground

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 10822

PostPosted: Fri Mar 29, 19 7:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I love the way they seem to pick up their skirts and scamper along. Wouldn't be surprised if we had some in the woodland edges in the woods, but never seen any.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 35422
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sat Mar 30, 19 4:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

third type of ladybird , a little black and yellow one with dots that almost look like part of a tiny chess board

new sparrows but only 2 so far

assorted invertebrates

there are quite a few sammisons but no dought the travels will start soon and there is the owl and puss issues.
at the mo the hound is baffled at how sammi can be in several places at once

buzzy



Joined: 04 Jan 2011
Posts: 3538
Location: In a small wood on the edge of the Huntingdonshire Wolds
PostPosted: Sun Mar 31, 19 12:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

dpack wrote:
third type of ladybird , a little black and yellow one with dots that almost look like part of a tiny chess board

…………………………..….


That'll be the Fourteen Spot Ladybird (Propylea quattuordecimpunctata), I think. Quite variable as to the squareness and connectedness of the spots.


Henry

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 10822

PostPosted: Sun Mar 31, 19 7:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I seem to recall we found some of them when we went insect hunting in the moat of one of the forts when I was at school. A student teacher arranged it as it is apparently known for its invertebrates, some of them quite rare, although I don't remember finding anything he got very exited about.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 35422
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sun Mar 31, 19 12:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

buzzy wrote:
dpack wrote:
third type of ladybird , a little black and yellow one with dots that almost look like part of a tiny chess board

…………………………..….


That'll be the Fourteen Spot Ladybird (Propylea quattuordecimpunctata), I think. Quite variable as to the squareness and connectedness of the spots.


Henry


thanks, i have seen spotty ones but not the chess board variation until now

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 35422
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu Apr 04, 19 10:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

the sparrows have worked out there is a seed feeder and two know how to use the nut one.

i watched a peregrine doing "flying " rather well.

it took a while to find the updraft to climb from 50 to 250 ft and then set off into town doing immelman turns every hundred yards or so to regain hight while only losing a little speed and getting a 360 eyeball as well.
clever even if pigeons dont shoot back.

there is a bit of tension between those aspects but i really like having both about.

first time i got to watch peregrines properly for a bit was while i was staying on a beach top for a month or so, they had a ledge about 50ft up the cliff i had a nice spot above all but spring tides or a storm surge.

they ignored me unless i went for a walk on the top and disturbed mice etc , they will take ground prey if feeding a chick which surprised me a bit , never saw them take a sea bird but there were very few pigeons around when i left.

stunning bird to watch in flight and quite amusing in it's domestic setting , the chicks are proper comedy critters when they are little . a bit more velocoraptor than baby chooks and the face is awesome .

not my snap but a very similar location

to see young uns looking like they do over a few weeks a peregrine chick image search will throw up a few typical poses

once they fledge and start to learn to hunt they can be pretty funny as well, the one 2 yrs back that hedge hopped over the ornamental flower beds and came to rest upside down in the pansies at my feet was most embarrassed
same one made the mistake of picking on a young crow and only it's speed and agility saved it from being a victim of the parliament

the ones that live on the minster have their own media profile but i think the local one is the 2 yr ago chick of those ones.
it works alone and they were still teaching the latest youngster when i last saw them ( 3 as a team is shocking efficient ) over the centre
and they brought 2 yr ago chick here to train it

is it plausible that they are raising a chick and finding it an unoccupied territory?
they are quite long term critters so it makes sense to settle the kid next door if next door is empty.

oh dear , a saluki and a liking for falcons, this could go badly as a camel is a beast too far .

afaik york has one breeding pair and a few of their children who might establish new territories and breed . assuming they are a bit shy of inbreeding it might take meeting up with another population to create more breeding pairs.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 10822

PostPosted: Fri Apr 05, 19 7:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

The one we sometimes have in the pylon near us has evicted the rooks; they have moved to the next one. Don't see it very often, but when it is about, the pigeons fly low.

I once saw roods teaching a youngster to fly. It landed legs and wings spread in the hedge, and looked rather funny. Mum and Dad were cawing encouragement to it, so it gathered itself together and hopped around in the hedge a bit to pretend it meant to land like that.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 35422
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sat Apr 06, 19 12:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

sparrow numbers increasing, at least 7 at the mo which is a good sign there will be lots fairly soon.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 10822

PostPosted: Sun Apr 07, 19 5:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Are they house or tree sparrows do you know Dpack? We get quite a lot of tree sparrows. Sometimes I pass a bush that is 'twittering' and is full of sparrows.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 35422
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sun Apr 07, 19 11:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

feeding in the bramble or off the birdfood house sparrows are at least 70 % but we have both types about.

half a mile further out of town and the ratio swaps

gz



Joined: 23 Jan 2009
Posts: 6583
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
PostPosted: Tue Apr 09, 19 7:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Interesting going for a bike ride round the lanes and seeing whats there...and what we've missed.
Coltsfoot flowers gone over, celandine blooms just arriving, wild garlic well out.
All the daffodils are brown tinged...but these are not native daffs.
Larks and blackbirds, crows and rooks...and lambs.
A few hedgerow LBJs, sparrows and dunnocks, some I don't recognize the calls..but no chaffinches.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 35422
Location: yes
PostPosted: Tue Apr 09, 19 2:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

wren a mo ago, looked in good condition as it bounced about in the twiggery.

Ty Gwyn



Joined: 22 Sep 2010
Posts: 4247
Location: Lampeter
PostPosted: Tue Apr 09, 19 7:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

gz wrote:
Interesting going for a bike ride round the lanes and seeing whats there...and what we've missed.
Coltsfoot flowers gone over, celandine blooms just arriving, wild garlic well out.
All the daffodils are brown tinged...but these are not native daffs.
Larks and blackbirds, crows and rooks...and lambs.
A few hedgerow LBJs, sparrows and dunnocks, some I don't recognize the calls..but no chaffinches.



I know nothing about flowers,but the daffs around the house ,different types,but I was told the small ones were Welsh daffs,they were out first and still look good were some of the others are brownish as you say.

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