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dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 36555
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sun Feb 02, 20 2:35 am    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

not wildlife but wildlife context

i was out and about today and the flora had a 4 month span

ie autumn leaves and spring growth, both looking fresh, next to each other.

if i find it odd it seems likely many other life forms will.

daylight or temp? is that me or dinner or both of us timing it wrong?
that is a bit of a problem for any lifeform, it could really nobble some and make pests of others very easily.

adapt and survive, i welcome my new masters, the huge seaslater things

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 11551

PostPosted: Sun Feb 02, 20 9:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

That isn't uncommon for this time of year. Beech and a few other trees will hold some of their leaves all winter in an autumn state. It has been quite mild, so I don't think the sap has gone down properly either, which would account for the autumn leaves still looking fresh. Some trees, and quite a lot of flowers will be putting out fresh growth if it is a mild winter. I have seen a primrose flower, but it has its head well down in the leaves, which is usual for the very early ones.

I am just hoping the birch will stay dormant for a few more weeks and that we get fine weather so I can collect enough.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 36555
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sun Feb 02, 20 4:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

quite a few things are sapping up and some are budding, i recon that stuff is about a month to six weeks earlier than it was 50 yrs ago

the leaf fall stuff was usually done well before november int north

there are studies of season changes , the cherry blossom one is one of the longest based on direct observations

pdf here from page 14,

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 11551

PostPosted: Mon Feb 03, 20 7:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Very interesting. Yesterday we noticed that some of the mirabelle plum blossom is starting to come out along roadsides here. It is the earliest of the prunus to flower, and will be followed by the blackthorn.

derbyshiredowser



Joined: 11 Feb 2007
Posts: 923
Location: derbyshire
PostPosted: Mon Feb 03, 20 10:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Eldest son and girlfriend have had a bad year fighting to keep jobs and then my cancer diagnosis so they have saved up and are in the Kruger national park and sent a text yesterday that not many people will ever get " Forced out of honeymoon suite hot tub by angry monkey ". they also sent a Whats app of a baby giraffe having a rest on a dirt track. He was always fascinated by Lion king and jungle book as a kid so this is a dream trip.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 36555
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon Feb 03, 20 11:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    



quality far better than "made sea sick by a mole under my rather nice deco club chair"

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 11551

PostPosted: Tue Feb 04, 20 7:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Well that is novel. I hope they have a really lovely time as it sounds as if they deserve it. All the best for you too.

The snowdrops up the lane to the woods are now in flower, so looking rather pretty. Heard at least one thrush in the woods setting up territory.

gregotyn



Joined: 24 Jun 2010
Posts: 2123
Location: Llanfyllin area
PostPosted: Tue Feb 04, 20 2:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

What a talking point, derbyshiredowser, for the rest of life! I would have left the monkey with my wife for the amount of time I was married!

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 11551

PostPosted: Wed Feb 05, 20 7:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

The big mirabelle plum down in the village is starting to come into flower. It is always pretty early, but looks lovely most years. Also found a few more primroses, but something had eaten most of the flowers.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 36555
Location: yes
PostPosted: Wed Feb 19, 20 8:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

a small and probably old bird observation

mr brack is changing out of his school uniform into his work suit.

this started with a hint of orange at his face/beak interface and has run both directions from there

over 6 wks or so he has replaced brown feathers with black ones tailwards, and his beak has become more orange forwards.

at the mo he is 80% grown up
mrs brack(similar age but a bit ahead )had decided he is a keeper
he now "sings" to declare the territory taken

both will feed within a few feet of me


dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 36555
Location: yes
PostPosted: Wed Feb 19, 20 10:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

in other bird and wildlife news

a pair of blue tits have taken up residence over the alley and established feeding rights on the peanut cage(nowt bigger than tiny bits can be got out so fine for little uns etc)
they had to tell the sparrows they were entitled to the bounty but things are now arranged so as everyone wins

dik has gone, this one fell out with the sparrows, got well mouthy on the very top twig of a perfect (at 140mph) tree is my most plausible explanation for his abscence.
much as i like them, i do tend to side with the sparrows in that he was a bit of an ####.

re co living in birdtown at the mo, the constant feeders are

the sparrows,
mr and mrs brack
i need a good name for these two but so far they are too rude so the blue tits
one, or perhaps many but one at a time, wren/s
fat ankles and two sticks the wood pigeons (fat pigeon was taken by a raptor)

those can all feed together cross species no conflicts
the sparrows and bracks is well Jurassic Park to watch
at this time of year there is no competition for live insects between sparrow and wren/s
afaik so far wren/s do not see dried mealworms as food which seems a bit odd, maybe dinner needs to be alive.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 11551

PostPosted: Thu Feb 20, 20 7:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Our robin didn't like dried mealworms. Think they must be a bit big for them as they eat the broken up ones in fat pellets.

Slim



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 5598
Location: New England (In the US of A)
PostPosted: Thu Feb 20, 20 9:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Mrs Slim came across fisher tracks in our woods the other day. We've been trying to decide whether our house cat will get outdoor privileges again come spring, but that makes it harder

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 36555
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu Feb 20, 20 6:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

fisher?

what critter is that?

would puss compromise with a sensitive bell?, outdoors but only allowed degraded stealth capabilities seems better than confined inside

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 36555
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu Feb 20, 20 10:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

high and fast but it knows how to play the lighting


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