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gas supply to a cooker?

 
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Jonnyboy



Joined: 29 Oct 2004
Posts: 23924
Location: under some rain.
PostPosted: Fri Oct 21, 05 11:41 am    Post subject: gas supply to a cooker?  Reply with quote    

Now, as a disclaimer I recommend that no one tries this at home.

But, We have a gas/electric range in the new house, with the gas hob getting it's supply from a propane tank outside.

I have a duct installed in the floor for the supply pipe, it's a standard installation over here.

So far I've been let down four times by Corgi registered suppliers who want me to pay 130 for the privilege.

I'm totally fed up with waiting and cooking for four people on a camping stove.

So, I've got the canister, a 20bar regulator and the appropriate flexible gas pipe. It's not "officially" approved for the distance involved but as a temporary supply it should be OK. It's the sort you have from your tank to your gas bbq.

I've changed the gas jets on the cooker over to the lpq type so it's hopefully just a matter of connecting the pipe, checking everything and switching on. The cooker has a safety cut out which closes the inlet valve if the flame goes out.

This is just a temporary measure until the lazy arses bother to turn up, so......Will I blow up the house?

Last edited by Jonnyboy on Fri Oct 21, 05 11:50 am; edited 1 time in total

Treacodactyl
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 21, 05 11:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Witching on? I've no idea but can you turn the supply off at the tank when you're not using the range?

Jonnyboy



Joined: 29 Oct 2004
Posts: 23924
Location: under some rain.
PostPosted: Fri Oct 21, 05 11:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

duly edited. Yes i can turn the supply of and on as required.

sean
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Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 41915
Location: North Devon
PostPosted: Fri Oct 21, 05 11:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

No idea. IIRC flexible piping isn't meant to be used for more than about a metre. Though there was a bloke near where we used to live who'd used it to install a gas fire on the inside of his kitchen door so that he could open the door and use it as a patio heater.
Let us know how you get on, if you can.

Jonnyboy



Joined: 29 Oct 2004
Posts: 23924
Location: under some rain.
PostPosted: Fri Oct 21, 05 12:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

sean wrote:
No idea. IIRC flexible piping isn't meant to be used for more than about a metre..


Correct, but i can't find a british standard for lpg piping

sean
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Joined: 28 Oct 2004
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Location: North Devon
PostPosted: Fri Oct 21, 05 12:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

ISO 2928:2003. I think. Unfortunately you have to buy them, unless your library has them. Our public library pays a royalty so that you can view them over the interweb.

dougal



Joined: 15 Jan 2005
Posts: 7184
Location: South Kent
PostPosted: Fri Oct 21, 05 1:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

If you are using a matched set of gas/regulator/jets I can't see that its significantly different from the picnic stove.
One thing that might be is the rate of gas consumption, ie the rate of gas flow through, for example the regulator. I'd guess that this would maybe give you smaller flames as you tried to run more burners. But that shouldn't be a safety problem as long as things *do* shut off if a flame goes out (standard these days IIRC).
As long as the hose is gas-tight and you are not going to be flexing/chafeing it, that shouldn't be a problem...
So, its down to the gas-tightness of the joints then!
I'm sure its not strictly legit, but I can't see how any harm could come from it.

PS - you might take measures to conceal/protect the cylinder/pipe rather than worrying about "stress-relieving" the joints in case of accidental snagging causing a disconnection...

Jonnyboy



Joined: 29 Oct 2004
Posts: 23924
Location: under some rain.
PostPosted: Fri Oct 21, 05 2:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Quote:
PS - you might take measures to conceal/protect the cylinder/pipe rather than worrying about "stress-relieving" the joints in case of accidental snagging causing a disconnection...


Good point, I've used standard exterior water pipe as the duct but would need some flxible sleeve as two 90deg bends are required.

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