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Energy efficient lights at Tesco
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Penny Outskirts



Joined: 18 Sep 2005
Posts: 23385
Location: Planet, not on the....
PostPosted: Tue Sep 27, 05 2:08 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

One of my children is afraid of the dark, so has a small lamp in their room which they keep on - i just could not do it if not for these bulbs. It's lasted for years!! Cost a fortune originally though!

High Green Farm



Joined: 30 Nov 2004
Posts: 349
Location: Mid-Suffolk
PostPosted: Wed Sep 28, 05 3:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Incidentally I was looking at these in a small electrical shop today, and they were charging between 7 and 9 each!

Why the big difference? Just down to purchasing power?

Will



Joined: 30 Jun 2005
Posts: 571
Location: Grenoside, Sheffield
PostPosted: Wed Sep 28, 05 3:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I think it's because they're the older style ones with loops of flourescent tube rather than the conventional shaped ones, and because Tesco are phasing them out. Tesco's offering ranges from these cheapies to about 9. Just make sure that you pick the full size ones rather than the mini which comes in a near identical box but costs over 6. The shelf immediately behind the BOGOF sign last night was full of the mini ones. I didn't notice until they were put through the till and the bill came to 41

On top of which Tesco now have to drag you over to the customer service desk and phone Visa to get authorisation before letting you sign the slip rather than using a PIN.

So it took me 45 minutes to buy six light bulbs, some razor blades and a jar of crystallised ginger. Since I was on the way back from rugby training and hadn't had a shower, I suspect I may have been less than appealing to the lovely lady who served me.

Bernie66



Joined: 14 Jan 2005
Posts: 13967
Location: Eastoft
PostPosted: Wed Sep 28, 05 4:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

They're always 19.7 in Asda. Deep supermarket joy, buying power and screwing the suppliers i guess!

Jonnyboy



Joined: 29 Oct 2004
Posts: 23924
Location: under some rain.
PostPosted: Wed Sep 28, 05 7:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Still, they give off a nice white light and I had 10 running and the genny didn't even notice.

High Green Farm



Joined: 30 Nov 2004
Posts: 349
Location: Mid-Suffolk
PostPosted: Wed Sep 28, 05 8:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Stowmarket Tesco sold out today when my wife went....I'll have a try at the weekend when I will also be looking to get the 19.99 18V rechargeable drill with two batteries from Lidl......seems to be an offer far to good to refuse!

sean
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 41915
Location: North Devon
PostPosted: Wed Sep 28, 05 8:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

whitelegg1 wrote:

If it is a super deal that can't be beaten elsewhere, then they are seriously cutting their margins. Buy at Tescos, but make sure you don't get sucked into spending extra on other stuff.


Sadly the margin tends to come from the supplier in these cases. But that's their decision with stuff like light-bulbs.

Lozzie



Joined: 25 May 2005
Posts: 2595

PostPosted: Mon Oct 10, 05 5:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Aldi's have the 60w equivalents at 1.99 this week.

Mr Solar



Joined: 23 Oct 2005
Posts: 10

PostPosted: Sun Oct 30, 05 4:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

With low energy light bulbs proven to reduce electricty cost by up to 80%, reducing carbon emmisions at the same time, why hasnt the government in its goal to reduce Co2 cut the 17.5% value added tax on these energy saving bulbs, raising the tax on the throw away, heat burning bulbs?

The consumer may have been sold or given a couple of low energy bulbs of the stick type which everybody hates, but have any of you when in a pub, club or hotel etc noticed how few, if any these businesess use to reduce their E bills? none,WHY? becouse if they reduce their electricty bill through changing hundreds of heat emitting throw away bulbs, they would end up paying higher taxes, through higher profits, when its much easier to increase prices.

In the not to distant future, Ecotricty will be offering a brand new type of small twist light bulb, both in a daylight and a soft colour in a number of watt outputs from 7 to 24 and much cheaper than Tesco as the cost of these type of bulbs being manufactured and used by 90% of the population fall in cost. The only reason why low energy light bulbs are still very expensive is becouse its not in the interests of the BIG 3 bulb suppliers to reduce them as they last to long.

Next year watch out for the latest in cathode lighting and LED where the electricty needed per bulb is 2 watts, and a life of 25,000 hrs, no good for Tesco, need to have people buying regular each week, not once in a life time.

As a last point, has anybody noticed how very few of re-chargable batteries and the charging devices that are not sold or visible at any supermarket? The reason is becouse the batteries last to long having used and sold them for years, never to buy a throw away battery again as part of our life style is to reduce the dumping of chemicals into the ground which ends up in the water table.

Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Sun Oct 30, 05 5:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Some interesting points, but as someone who has tried various energy saving things:

I'm not sure if it's our power supply but I found the energy saving bulbs I tried a while back didn't last very long, some less than a year. we are trying them again some hopefully it was just bad luck.

Rechargable batteries on the other hand just don't seem to last in use. I don't expect them to last that long on a charge but some times items like digital cameras drian a set of batteries in a few shots. Until they are better I can see people not wishing to use them.

ele



Joined: 05 Sep 2005
Posts: 814
Location: Derby
PostPosted: Sun Oct 30, 05 5:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Treacodactyl wrote:

I'm not sure if it's our power supply but I found the energy saving bulbs I tried a while back didn't last very long, some less than a year. we are trying them again some hopefully it was just bad luck.

Rechargable batteries on the other hand just don't seem to last in use. I don't expect them to last that long on a charge but some times items like digital cameras drian a set of batteries in a few shots. Until they are better I can see people not wishing to use them.


I've had different experiences, the energy saving lightbulbs (I'm scared to bring up the subject as I might sound like the forum joke post ) have nearly always lasted many, many years and with batteries the Ni-Mh ones seem to work well in even high drain gadgets.

dougal



Joined: 15 Jan 2005
Posts: 7184
Location: South Kent
PostPosted: Sun Oct 30, 05 10:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

As I think may be known, I admire the low consumption of these bulbs, but detest the light quality of every one I've seen.

I had to get a variety of bulbs a couple of weeks ago, and was amazed at the price differences. Homebase were generally twice Tesco's price. And Homebase were asking nearly 8 (if memory serves) for a low energy bulb that I bought (Phillips-branded) from Lidl for under 2...


Rechargeables. For any high current drain usage (even a DECT phone) NiMH rechargeables really show up the limitations of NiCd. (And outlast them in the number of recharge cycles too.)
NiMH cells can usually be swapped straight in as upgrade replacements for NiCd - same charger, etc.
However, in portable kit (like a camera), there's a hard design choice to be made - heavier with a longer battery runtime, or lighter but with little stamina.
In items where power density (stored energy per gramme of weight) is very important to sales (laptops, mobile phones, 'better' cameras...) the expensive Lithium Ion cells are usually chosen by the designers. These cells are not swappable for anything else.

Technology signpost - look out for consumer batteries in the near future made with "nanotechnology" (actually just extremely fine powders) which promise such benefits as near-instant recharging...
There is enthusiasm about fuel cells using methanol - but, awkwardly, such devices are currently banned from being taken on board an aircraft...


And Lidl's *do*, a few times a year, offer NiMH rechargeables - at such an attractive price that folk will queue up outside waiting for the store to open. Well worth watching for!

Jonnyboy



Joined: 29 Oct 2004
Posts: 23924
Location: under some rain.
PostPosted: Mon Oct 31, 05 9:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I don't mind the light quality, it's crap on start up obviously but the yellowish tinge of old is certainly much, much reduced.

An 11 or 20w will give a good, white light IMHO.

ele



Joined: 05 Sep 2005
Posts: 814
Location: Derby
PostPosted: Mon Oct 31, 05 9:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

the light quality is variable with flourescents though, some of the cheaper or older ones can be so slow and harsh, but some of the newer ones are definitely better and give a warmer glow, must admit they're never as homely as an incandescent, though it's nice to not forever be changing lightbulbs

ele



Joined: 05 Sep 2005
Posts: 814
Location: Derby
PostPosted: Mon Oct 31, 05 9:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

dougal wrote:

In items where power density (stored energy per gramme of weight) is very important to sales (laptops, mobile phones, 'better' cameras...) the expensive Lithium Ion cells are usually chosen by the designers. These cells are not swappable for anything else.


I notice that my little sony DSV-V1 camera has an inbuilt Li ion battery, and works pretty well and the battery itself is weirdly light, I'd never noticed that before

On the other hand the pro Digital SLR Canon of my hubbie's has got a Ni-Mh battery (which lasts seriously ages on a single charge) I guess that's because the camera and lens are already the weight of a small child so there's little point making the battery light

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