Home Page
   Articles
       links
About Us    
Traders        
Recipes            
Latest Articles
Traditional foods in supermarkets

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Downsizer Forum Index -> Reviews and What's On
Author 
 Message
Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 34031
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Mon Mar 12, 12 7:25 am    Post subject: Traditional foods in supermarkets  Reply with quote    

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-17255796

wildfoodie



Joined: 05 Apr 2005
Posts: 2169

PostPosted: Mon Mar 12, 12 7:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I've no problem with such foods being available in supermarkets, so long as the producers receive a fair price for their goods and are not coerced into heavily discounting supermarkets' purchases whilst charging the 'normal rate' to their independent retail customers. Unfortunately that is generally what happens, we always know when a supermarket has started stocking one of our lines, the sales just stop or slow to a trickle and we then get into stock management issues and usually end up dropping the product.

marigold



Joined: 02 Sep 2005
Posts: 12458
Location: West Sussex
PostPosted: Mon Mar 12, 12 8:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

In ye olden dayes when I was a young woman (say 30 years ago) you could buy cheap food like black pudding in Sainsbury's. And other things which are now Farmer's Market specialities. They even had wild rabbit most of the year (and horrid caged rabbit meat all year).

It's mildly irritating to think of what used to be cheap easily available local products being sold as foodie luxuries. Rabbit joints in Waitrose are laughably expensive now.

Nicky Colour it green



Joined: 25 Jun 2007
Posts: 8698
Location: Devon, uk
PostPosted: Mon Mar 12, 12 9:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

but black pudding is readily available everywhere - isn't it?

Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 34031
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Mon Mar 12, 12 10:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

colour it green wrote:
but black pudding is readily available everywhere - isn't it?


It is, but it's made from dried blood, which makes a difference, apparently.

Nicky Colour it green



Joined: 25 Jun 2007
Posts: 8698
Location: Devon, uk
PostPosted: Mon Mar 12, 12 10:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Nick wrote:
colour it green wrote:
but black pudding is readily available everywhere - isn't it?


It is, but it's made from dried blood, which makes a difference, apparently.

oh right sorry - i missed that bit.

joanne



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 7095
Location: Morecambe, Lancashire
PostPosted: Mon Mar 12, 12 11:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

It's Booths doing the scheme - Booths have always promoted local foods and it's a fantastic supermarket, be interesting to see what they come up with

troyannick



Joined: 24 Dec 2011
Posts: 605

PostPosted: Wed Mar 14, 12 7:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

another step forward, supermarkets are changing and theres obviously a demand, but as wildfoodie says the pricing has to be fair all round.

I really miss Booths,great shop, was working at Lancaster Uni and theres one nearby..not cheap, but the ale section was great.

Id love a farmers market section in our supermarket.

Chez



Joined: 13 Aug 2006
Posts: 35907
Location: The Hive of the Uberbee, Quantock Hills, Somerset
PostPosted: Wed Mar 14, 12 8:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

wildfoodie wrote:
I've no problem with such foods being available in supermarkets, so long as the producers receive a fair price for their goods and are not coerced into heavily discounting supermarkets' purchases whilst charging the 'normal rate' to their independent retail customers. Unfortunately that is generally what happens, we always know when a supermarket has started stocking one of our lines, the sales just stop or slow to a trickle and we then get into stock management issues and usually end up dropping the product.


Exactly. A local cheese factory got picked up by one of the big supermarkets and invested in loads of new kit to keep up with the new demand. The supermarket dropped them with a few weeks notice and they went bust.

Supermarkets do not do producers any favours at all; they suck everyone in to their gaping black-hole maw, sew up the market and then spit out what doesn't suit them.

Bebo



Joined: 21 May 2007
Posts: 12569
Location: East Sussex
PostPosted: Wed Mar 14, 12 8:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

They aren't all bad. These guys are quite good.

http://www.jempsons.com/

Chez



Joined: 13 Aug 2006
Posts: 35907
Location: The Hive of the Uberbee, Quantock Hills, Somerset
PostPosted: Wed Mar 14, 12 9:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Bebo wrote:
They aren't all bad. These guys are quite good.

http://www.jempsons.com/


Yep, sure they are some around that aren't bonded to the dark side.

Post new topic   Reply to topic    Downsizer Forum Index -> Reviews and What's On All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1
View Latest Posts View Latest Posts

 

Archive
Powered by php-BB © 2001, 2005 php-BB Group
Style by marsjupiter.com, released under GNU (GNU/GPL) license.
Copyright 2004 marsjupiter.com