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natural border

 
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franco



Joined: 05 Nov 2004
Posts: 113
Location: Bolton, Lancashire
PostPosted: Wed Jan 05, 05 9:31 pm    Post subject: natural border  Reply with quote    

I'm looking to enclose a garden but don't particularly want to yse Leylandii, any other suggestions?

Franco

www.sausagemaking.org

Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Wed Jan 05, 05 9:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I would tend to go for a natural hedge. One year old whips, after a little soil preparation, do grow very quickly. Even on poor chalk we have managed about 8 - 10 feet of growth from some plants in three years.

However, it would depend on what you need the enclosure for. If it's for goats then you do not want to use anything poisonous (rhododendrons are leathal I think). On the other hand anything edible will get eaten.

Some form of wire fence and hedge may be best.

franco



Joined: 05 Nov 2004
Posts: 113
Location: Bolton, Lancashire
PostPosted: Wed Jan 05, 05 9:56 pm    Post subject: fence Reply with quote    

The goats will be in the back garden, the hedge is for the front.


Franco

www.sausagemaking.org

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44156
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Wed Jan 05, 05 10:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

How high and dense do you want it?

Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Wed Jan 05, 05 10:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

If you would like it neat yew would seem good, holly even?

I have found here that young trees, good soil preparation and watering in the first year mean quite a few type of plants will grow quickly and form a good hedge.

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44156
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Wed Jan 05, 05 10:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I like yew, and beech, even privet's nice, give us more of an idea of how decorative you want it.

Bugs



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 10744

PostPosted: Wed Jan 05, 05 10:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Privet is good for a certain butterfly, isn't it?

As part of our mixed hedging we bought a couple of field maples which have grown brilliantly, but they make such lovely trees, it seems almost a pity to restrict them to a hedge.

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44156
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Wed Jan 05, 05 10:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

There's a whole range of hedging that's good for biodiversity, tell us more Franco

hardworkinghippy



Joined: 01 Jan 2005
Posts: 1110
Location: Bourrou South West France
PostPosted: Wed Jan 05, 05 10:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Careful, Yew is deadly to most animals!

Treacodactyl
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Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Thu Jan 06, 05 7:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Yes, if there is any chance goats getting into the front garden or clippings getting near to the goats there are some obvious and some less obvious toxic plants that probably shouldn't be used.

I'll try and find a list, there has been a mention of this in Coutry Smallholding in the last year.

sean
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 41912
Location: North Devon
PostPosted: Thu Jan 06, 05 7:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

The nursery in town here (and I assume others) sells traditional mixed hedging as whips. It's cheap at this time of year too.

lorrayne



Joined: 17 Dec 2004
Posts: 221
Location: Hampshire
PostPosted: Thu Jan 06, 05 7:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Go mad weave yourself a willow hedge.
One thing here in Belgium they use a lot and it does look effective and is quite low maintenance is green wire mesh between posts and then train ivy over it and it does give a solid looking evergreen hedge - plus you also have the option of adding clematis for a touch of colour.
Tapestry hedges do it for me tho yew, beech,golden privet, silver privet, laurel, copper beech, so you have some colour and texture all year round. Once used Buddleias for a hedge different shades - wonderful scent and masses of butterflies just looks a tatty in winter and then a bit forlorn when you prune it - still whats life if you cant experiment

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