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"TRESPASSERS WILL BE SHOT"
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Mutton



Joined: 09 May 2009
Posts: 1508

PostPosted: Fri Jun 24, 11 6:15 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

Are you a member of British Beekeeping Society?

They (certainly used to) do bee specific insurance and could probably talk you through this.

Oh and in terms of signs, an American I used to know who owned a thumping great vicious looking (soft as butter) dog, said Beware = I admit he is dangerous. Be aware doesn't.

Equally if you put up signs of any sort saying "bees here" you might have vandals in at night. I never had any trouble, but I do remember seeing adverts for beekeeping suits in camouflage colours so if you had beehives in places where they might get vandalised (old railway siding or whatever) it was less obvious when you went to tend them.

Tavascarow



Joined: 06 Aug 2006
Posts: 8407
Location: South Cornwall
PostPosted: Fri Jun 24, 11 6:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Mutton wrote:
Are you a member of British Beekeeping Society?

They (certainly used to) do bee specific insurance and could probably talk you through this.

Oh and in terms of signs, an American I used to know who owned a thumping great vicious looking (soft as butter) dog, said Beware = I admit he is dangerous. Be aware doesn't.

Equally if you put up signs of any sort saying "bees here" you might have vandals in at night. I never had any trouble, but I do remember seeing adverts for beekeeping suits in camouflage colours so if you had beehives in places where they might get vandalised (old railway siding or whatever) it was less obvious when you went to tend them.

From what I've read no one in the UK has ever been prosecuted for their bees causing a nuisance or stinging someone.
It's down to the individual to prove who's bees have been causing the problem.
I suppose with DNA testing, that is now possible, but not cheap.
So BBKA insurance is a waste of money IMHO.

WandaBlue



Joined: 03 Feb 2011
Posts: 40
Location: Sanday, Orkney
PostPosted: Tue Jun 28, 11 2:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Thought this link might be relevant here:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-sussex-13942849

dan1



Joined: 23 Jun 2010
Posts: 102
Location: Bristolish
PostPosted: Tue Jul 05, 11 10:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

That link was about horses which disturbed the hives/knocked them over which shouldn't be a problem if he keeps them out of my garden. There isn't any good, non-anecdotal evidence that bees are attracted to horses or their sweat and all the instances of harm I can find have arisen after livestock knocked over hives. Usually exacerbated by them being tethered/fenced in + unable to run away.

mark



Joined: 14 Jul 2005
Posts: 2186
Location: Leeds
PostPosted: Tue Jul 05, 11 10:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I gather the normally way to mollify neighbours close to hive sites is to gift them honey.

If you haven't done this over the years maybe a little catch up would be called for.

If it is hard for him to let his stables he will take a financial loss if he loses the customers - times are hard now so if he is letting stables he didn't before maybe he needs the income.

You can both try to find a mutually acceptable solution - or you can slug it out!

If you have gifted some honey and put up mesh to redirect bees and he is still awkward then you can shoot him - but not before !

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 10684

PostPosted: Fri Jul 22, 11 9:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Some horse owners say bees will attack horses whether this is true or not.

BBKA insurance will give you third party insurance, so is useful in case of problems. In addition, a local beekeeping association affiliated to BBKA can give you other support, training and sometimes other advantages.

If you do all you can to minimise the nuisance, like make sure the bees will go well above any horse riders etc. you will have been seen to have done all you can. Try talking to the farmer explaining all this. If he won't talk, then you can't do anything about it I am afraid, exept take advice (CAB may be able to help), or move your hives.

A percieved risk is always a problem with bees even if there is no actual risk.

Sally Too



Joined: 14 Sep 2006
Posts: 2511
Location: N.Ireland
PostPosted: Fri Jul 22, 11 9:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

On the topic of horses - we have both bees and horses here. For a while the bees were sited with just a wire fence between them and the horse field. We had no problems. The bees tended to go up fairly quickly anyway and on the odd day a bee bumped off a horse the horse just tossed its head and moved out of the flight path.

Of course the bot fly looks and sounds like a bee and they do chase and harass horses trying to lay eggs on their legs. Horses hate these and will often gallop round the field to try to evade them. The bot fly will give chase! We had one pony who didn't care and was covered in eggs, another who would go batty and we'd bring her in to protect her.

Our bees are now sited on a bank above the garden. Sometimes their flight path goes over the bounce zone of the trampoline! So the kids have to wait a bit. Another day they were coming round the hedge to where I was working in the garden. I didn't get stung but was bumped and investigated a bit. So I hung a sheet up to divert them another way until I'd finished my task.

It sounds as though this neighbour didn't approach you very tactfully. Hopefully it can all be sorted amicably. A pot of honey, some indication of how to reduce bee flow over the yard, and I'm sure it will turn out that you just caught the neighbour on a bad day.... we all have them I'm sure!

Hope it all works out for you both.

Marches



Joined: 13 Dec 2011
Posts: 171
Location: Nr Peak District, England
PostPosted: Thu Mar 29, 12 10:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

He's trying to rent out the stables to people with horses and doesn't want them or the horses to get stung. Just be reasonable and move the hive.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 35259
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu Mar 29, 12 10:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

would a jar of huney and a nice cup of tea sort it out ?

toggle



Joined: 30 Dec 2006
Posts: 11622
Location: truro
PostPosted: Fri Mar 30, 12 12:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Marches wrote:
He's trying to rent out the stables to people with horses and doesn't want them or the horses to get stung. Just be reasonable and move the hive.


giving way to someoen who is being angry, aggressive and unreasonable is usually a good way to end up with them making successively more unreasonable demands.

Marches



Joined: 13 Dec 2011
Posts: 171
Location: Nr Peak District, England
PostPosted: Fri Mar 30, 12 12:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

toggle wrote:
Marches wrote:
He's trying to rent out the stables to people with horses and doesn't want them or the horses to get stung. Just be reasonable and move the hive.


giving way to someoen who is being angry, aggressive and unreasonable is usually a good way to end up with them making successively more unreasonable demands.


I know, but in this case the demand isn't unreasonable, if anything it is inconsiderate not to move the considering the reasons.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 35259
Location: yes
PostPosted: Fri Mar 30, 12 12:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

try to talk sensibly
if both parties understand the needs of the other it is easier to find a happy ending that is good for all

teach the bees to go postal is another option

Tavascarow



Joined: 06 Aug 2006
Posts: 8407
Location: South Cornwall
PostPosted: Fri Mar 30, 12 6:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Marches wrote:
toggle wrote:
Marches wrote:
He's trying to rent out the stables to people with horses and doesn't want them or the horses to get stung. Just be reasonable and move the hive.


giving way to someoen who is being angry, aggressive and unreasonable is usually a good way to end up with them making successively more unreasonable demands.


I know, but in this case the demand isn't unreasonable, if anything it is inconsiderate not to move the considering the reasons.

The original poster has as much right to keep bees on their land as he to keep horses on his.
Facing a hive entrance in the opposite direction & screening the boundary so any bees flying that way will be high above any danger is perfectly adequate to minimise the risk of anyone, or any ones horse being stung to an acceptable level.
I would be very careful not to let them swarm so plenty of space, early splits, a queen that doesn't produce over swarmy bees (keep away from Italian genes) & obviously good tempered bees would be essential IMHO,
If a swarm pitches in his yard or sets up home in his barn he wont be pleased even though in the swarming state they are at their most harmless, unless a fool swipes them with a stick.
Unfortunately with bees it's impossible to keep them in one place, so if anyone gets stung in his stable by anything wild, feral or an entirely different species you & your bees will get blamed.

Education is the best policy but from the original posters description his neighbour doesn't seem to see it from any perspective other than hid own so I wish them luck..

magnet



Joined: 05 Apr 2010
Posts: 34
Location: Northumberland
PostPosted: Thu Apr 05, 12 8:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

forget the sign just go round and nut him! simples.

argee



Joined: 15 Mar 2011
Posts: 5
Location: Torbay..
PostPosted: Sat Oct 20, 12 7:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Could it be offered to Chute the Offender to care not where they land ...

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