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aga or rayburn
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faerienono



Joined: 28 May 2011
Posts: 363

PostPosted: Sun Jan 13, 13 9:57 am    Post subject: aga or rayburn  Reply with quote    

I am used to using the aga, I love it's constant warmth, the fact that the ovens are always ready to use, and the way it acts as the heart of the home.
We are (God willing) moving to a new 200 year old home, and want to install either an aga or a rayburn in it.
I am looking for advice please regarding the differences between the two, as I haven't had any experience of a rayburn before.
There is a condensing boiler in the house already, although it will need to be moved, and we are not sure whether to run the central heating and hot water from the rayburn or whether to stick with the boiler, or alternatively to run the boiler to the workshop part of the house and the rayburn to the living area.
Looking forward to your comments, thanks!

Cathryn



Joined: 16 Jul 2005
Posts: 19856
Location: Ceredigion
PostPosted: Sun Jan 13, 13 8:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Aga for cooking, rayburn for heating. Neither are particularly efficient.

Depends how big the house is really. Have you looked at everhot and stanley. They are more up to date in what they do.

Ty Gwyn



Joined: 22 Sep 2010
Posts: 4340
Location: Lampeter
PostPosted: Sun Jan 13, 13 8:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Don`t believe Aga`s do central heating,unless they have changed in recent years.

chicken feed



Joined: 27 Aug 2009
Posts: 2677

PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 13 5:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Ty Gwyn wrote:
Don`t believe Aga`s do central heating,unless they have changed in recent years.


they did'nt when we brought our rayburn. thats what swung us towards the rayburn.

we run a rayburn through the colder months it easily manages to run the central heating (10 rooms), water and cooking on 70% logs 30% coal.

johnc



Joined: 16 May 2005
Posts: 101
Location: Hay on Wye
PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 13 8:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Has to be an ESSE for us, totally wood burner and does the lot on from Nov. through til April and keeps everything warm and does the cooking

Nicky Colour it green



Joined: 25 Jun 2007
Posts: 8827
Location: Devon, uk
PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 13 8:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

what fuel?

we have a rayburn - mains gas - but plan to swap for woodburning and esse seem better imo

Mr O



Joined: 13 Feb 2005
Posts: 5512
Location: Nova Scotia, Canada
PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 13 4:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Bosky works for us.

faerienono



Joined: 28 May 2011
Posts: 363

PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 13 8:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

oil, there's no mains gas where we are going, and wood for the woodburners will be enough for us to cart around, so the ago/rayburn needs to be oil. Having been back to the property with our 'man wot does' he reckons the existing boiler is on the old side, so it looks as if the rayburn is winning. Do you have to preheat the oven in the rayburn though?

Nicky Colour it green



Joined: 25 Jun 2007
Posts: 8827
Location: Devon, uk
PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 13 10:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

with our rayburn we cook most things without turnjing it up - just on idling and allowing more time

it ran hotter if we used the CH - a second burner inside. to warm it up to a higher temp say to roast spuds it would take about 40 mins - but ours is old and tired.. a newer model would probably do a lot better.

faerienono



Joined: 28 May 2011
Posts: 363

PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 13 10:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

cig, that was one of my questions really, with the aga it is on constantly, so you get used to have ovens already up to temperature, but I understood that with a rayburn I would have to wait for 40 minutes to heat the oven up, and if I left it on al the time it would be really expensive?

Nicky Colour it green



Joined: 25 Jun 2007
Posts: 8827
Location: Devon, uk
PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 13 1:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

you leave the rayburn on constantly too - and yes it's expensive - on the other hand, mostly we dont use CH - the rayburn being on keeps the kitchen cosy, and makes constant hot water, and lends a ambient warmth to the rest of the house, and we light the woodburner for a little extra. In summer we let it out and only light if if we want to roast or something and get bonus hot water too, but from cold it would take a few hours to get to temp - the 40 mins i quoted was to change the temp from idling to hot enough to roast spuds.

but no doubt a new rayburn would perform better and you cannot install old inefficient gas/oil ones - so that sort of rules out secondhand

my ultimate (when time and money allows) plan is to move away from this set up - go to a wood burning range (and esse appears to be better, on paper anyway) to do much the same job only with us loading in wood rather than paying big gas bills. In reality we would probably use it less, but we would compensate with solar tubes for hot water, with an efficient gas boiler to top up hot water as necessary and do CH if we need it/have the flu/ etc

johnc



Joined: 16 May 2005
Posts: 101
Location: Hay on Wye
PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 13 3:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Yeh cant knock the Esse oonly drawback with ours is its not always easy to keep in, but it lights really easily so not really a problem

Tarrel



Joined: 17 Nov 2012
Posts: 18
Location: Ross-shire, Scotland
PostPosted: Sat Jan 19, 13 9:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Faerienono, we have just completed what seems like a similar project to yours. Our house is also about 200 years old, stone walls, single-glazed listed building. We had our central heating running on a oil-fired combi-boiler. (No gas in our neck of the woods).

We decided to go for a wood-burning Rayburn in our open-plan kitchen/hall area. It provides cooking and space-heating to a large part of the downstairs, plus provides hot water and central heating. We have it feeding a thermal store in the upstairs airing cupboard. The oil fired boiler has been re-routed to feed into this store also.

To be honest, the Rayburn struggles to cope with everything when running just on logs, so we have the oil boiler cut in for an hour or so in the mornings and evenings to boost the temperature of the store (which then feeds the radiators). We put a couple of shovels full of smokeless coal in at night, along with a couple of logs, and this keeps the Rayburn ticking over through the night. There's a hot bed of embers in the morning, and we just add in some kindling and logs and it fires up.

We've found it takes a lot of fuel to get the oven up to a bake or roast temperature, so we tend to do as someone suggested above, and slow-cook things in it on "simmer" (which it does superbly). We have a separate electric oven and hob for the really hot things. Hotplates on the Rayburn work very well indeed.

To answer your original question, both Rayburns and Agas are made by the same company. Rayburns run central heating, Agas don't.

As far as I understand, oil-fired Rayburns use a lot of oil. If you can stand the hassle of stoking it from time to time, I'd seriously look at solid fuel. Price for smokeless fuel is about half that of oil per kiloWatt hour. You can reduce this further if you have, or can scavenge, a supply of wood.

HTH.

Tarrel

Tarrel



Joined: 17 Nov 2012
Posts: 18
Location: Ross-shire, Scotland
PostPosted: Sat Jan 19, 13 9:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

@ Chickenfeed;

Could you tell me a bit more about the way you use logs and coal in your Rayburn? Also, what kind of wood do you burn? We struggle to keep our house warm on Rayburn alone, and we haven't got ten rooms!

faerienono



Joined: 28 May 2011
Posts: 363

PostPosted: Sun Jan 20, 13 9:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

thanks again for such informative replies. Looks as if we are going for the rayburn, running from oil. Some days I struggle to get walking in the morning, and I have to be sensible (although it goes against the grain) and go with oil rather than solid fuel. If I were not well enough to carry logs or coal, I would freeze otherwise!
Hoping that the woodburners will give a lot of heat and that way we can turn down the central heating when they are on. Going to train Pudney (my dog) to bring in the wood for them!

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