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A Chance of an allotment
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nettie



Joined: 02 Dec 2004
Posts: 5886
Location: Suffolk
PostPosted: Wed Jan 05, 05 1:53 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

Deerstalker wrote:


But knowing my luck, I'll get an 18 stone ex rugby team physio. with a hairy back, holding my head under water for 10 minutes!


That would be great, you can get him to clear the allotment for you.

Mrs Fiddlesticks



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 10460

PostPosted: Wed Jan 05, 05 2:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

i'm going to very quietly say acupuncture.... No intention of starting a thread here on complimentary medicine.

Does the doc reckon allotmenting will make things worse?

If not an allotment is there something you can do to your existing garden that will give you the satisfaction of home grown veg but in a more manageable way?

wellington womble



Joined: 08 Nov 2004
Posts: 14971
Location: East Midlands
PostPosted: Wed Jan 05, 05 3:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Deerstalker wrote:


Now I rather like the idea of a gorgeous young physiotherapist in a swimsuit bathing me in warm water!


They're the ones you really have to watch! At least with the big guys you can brace yourself!

daniel



Joined: 01 Jan 2005
Posts: 21
Location: Woodford Green, Essex
PostPosted: Wed Jan 05, 05 5:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Sarah, what is a permaculture mulch bed?
Cheers, daniel

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44226
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Wed Jan 05, 05 5:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Dunno, but this is a brief description of permaculture (and agroforestry)

http://www.downsizer.net/index.php?option=com_glossary&catid=97&func=display&search=permaculture

Sarah D



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 2584

PostPosted: Wed Jan 05, 05 5:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Will put up a separate post about the permaculture mulch bed so it doesn't get lost - it's really useful.

daniel



Joined: 01 Jan 2005
Posts: 21
Location: Woodford Green, Essex
PostPosted: Thu Jan 06, 05 7:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Thanks, very useful. I seem to remember something in the papers a while ago about growing popllar trees in feilds of rye to increase yeilds, a similar thing?

Sarah D



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 2584

PostPosted: Thu Jan 06, 05 7:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

That sounds more like the symbiotic effects of companion planting.

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44226
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Thu Jan 06, 05 8:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

That was more to do with harvesting the poplars at a later date, providing increased total income for a slightly reduced annual yield

mrutty



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 1578

PostPosted: Thu Jan 06, 05 10:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Double cropping. A very useful and sadly under used system. Any tall plant or tree works, Sweetcorn and courgettes work well. Fruit trees and any above ground veg (eg cabbage) works as well

nettie



Joined: 02 Dec 2004
Posts: 5886
Location: Suffolk
PostPosted: Thu Jan 06, 05 10:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Deerstalker, have you come to a decision yet??

alison
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 29 Oct 2004
Posts: 12908
Location: North Devon
PostPosted: Thu Jan 06, 05 10:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

daniel wrote:
Thanks, very useful. I seem to remember something in the papers a while ago about growing popllar trees in feilds of rye to increase yeilds, a similar thing?


I thought that was to divert the wind currents from the field and keep the crop warmer.

Sarah D



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 2584

PostPosted: Thu Jan 06, 05 11:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

mrutty wrote:
Double cropping. A very useful and sadly under used system. Any tall plant or tree works, Sweetcorn and courgettes work well. Fruit trees and any above ground veg (eg cabbage) works as well


There you go - symbiotic companion planting.

deerstalker



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 589

PostPosted: Thu Jan 06, 05 11:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

nettie wrote:
Deerstalker, have you come to a decision yet??


Well yes, I'd go for it! But remember the original post. It was the 'chance' of an allotment - not garanteed, so I'll post on developments.

Intesting point though, there must be disabled people with an ethical approach to consumption!

Can we help?

Bugs



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 10744

PostPosted: Fri Jan 07, 05 9:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

There are organisations that help people with gardening, so I've put up a different thread on that because I've added a few new links. I should imagine there are other specialised organisations too.

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