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Morrisons Backs British Beef & Lamb
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Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8919

PostPosted: Sat Dec 14, 13 7:21 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

It is good that they are stocking British meat, but it doesn't say anything about the flavour of course. When I have bought supermarket meat, I have often found it awful. I tend to take for granted that the stuff I buy from the farm shop or farmers market tastes good, but it really brings it home when I have something to compare it with.

Rob R



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 31902
Location: York
PostPosted: Sat Dec 14, 13 7:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Mistress Rose wrote:
It is good that they are stocking British meat, but it doesn't say anything about the flavour of course. When I have bought supermarket meat, I have often found it awful.


Not a fan of horse, then?

cir3ngirl



Joined: 13 Aug 2006
Posts: 4820
Location: Cirencester
PostPosted: Sat Dec 14, 13 7:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Mistress Rose wrote:
It is good that they are stocking British meat, but it doesn't say anything about the flavour of course. When I have bought supermarket meat, I have often found it awful. I tend to take for granted that the stuff I buy from the farm shop or farmers market tastes good, but it really brings it home when I have something to compare it with.


My Morrisons sirloin was fab last night. I might be a little biased as I now work for them but not had a bad piece of meat from them yet

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8919

PostPosted: Sun Dec 15, 13 10:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I have never knowingly eaten horse, although I don't object to it in principle. Just like to know what I am eating and where it comes from.

oldish chris



Joined: 14 Jun 2006
Posts: 4148
Location: Comfortably Wet Southport
PostPosted: Sun Dec 15, 13 2:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Mistress Rose wrote:
I have never knowingly eaten horse, although I don't object to it in principle. Just like to know what I am eating and where it comes from.
the problem wasn't that it was horsemeat. Those posh journalists thinking about their daughter's little pony. The problem was that the meat hadn't be certified as fit for human consumption.

If you are buying a recognisable cut of meat, a proper butcher would be able to identify the species, if not breed.

I'm afraid we've got the Coop's half-price NZ lamb this Sunday.

Cathryn



Joined: 16 Jul 2005
Posts: 19830
Location: Ceredigion
PostPosted: Sun Dec 15, 13 6:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Mistress Rose wrote:
It is good that they are stocking British meat, but it doesn't say anything about the flavour of course. When I have bought supermarket meat, I have often found it awful. I tend to take for granted that the stuff I buy from the farm shop or farmers market tastes good, but it really brings it home when I have something to compare it with.


But most of those farm shops and farmers markets are also selling the same meat to the supermarkets. Perhaps the customer is more careful with food bought with the added value of a farm shop or market?

I am not siding with the supermarkets but I wish people really had a better understanding of farming and of how varied it is.

Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 33696
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Sun Dec 15, 13 6:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Is there, potentially, a difference in the hanging times, maybe?

Cathryn



Joined: 16 Jul 2005
Posts: 19830
Location: Ceredigion
PostPosted: Sun Dec 15, 13 6:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Probably depends on the supermarket and the farmers market and and

If we ever have a big gathering again we should do a blind taste testing. (If only to stop Jack muttering.)

Cathryn



Joined: 16 Jul 2005
Posts: 19830
Location: Ceredigion
PostPosted: Sun Dec 15, 13 6:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

He has made me try Jacob and "ordinary". His argument is that they are both grown slowly here and so develop flavour. (I sound like Rob. ) Traditional breeds tend to be tastier don't they because they take longer to finish. (mutter mutter, not because there is anything intrinsically tasty about their meat - I am quoting here)


Anyway mutton? Because it has more flavour, can't provide anything particularly young because everything we eat is at least eighteen months old.

Rob R



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 31902
Location: York
PostPosted: Sun Dec 15, 13 6:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

oldish chris wrote:
Mistress Rose wrote:
I have never knowingly eaten horse, although I don't object to it in principle. Just like to know what I am eating and where it comes from.
the problem wasn't that it was horsemeat. Those posh journalists thinking about their daughter's little pony. The problem was that the meat hadn't be certified as fit for human consumption.

If you are buying a recognisable cut of meat, a proper butcher would be able to identify the species, if not breed.

I'm afraid we've got the Coop's half-price NZ lamb this Sunday.


I saw that in the coop leaflet that came by post - 'Best of British' on the pork leg joint, right next to the anonymous lamb leg and gammon joints.

Rob R



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 31902
Location: York
PostPosted: Sun Dec 15, 13 6:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Nick wrote:
Is there, potentially, a difference in the hanging times, maybe?


I'm well know for being sceptical about the value of hanging and I get quite annoyed by people who sell it as the 'traditional' thing to do, rather than the 'modern' way. This was brought home to me by an article in the Yorkshire Post & a thread on another forum on which some people were claiming that 3 or 4 weeks was a minimum, yet all the traditional Christmas prime stock markets are held around the first week in December, which only gives a maximum of up to 3 weeks hanging time, and that's if you butcher it on Christmas eve.

@Cathryn I'll take that as a compliment!

Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 33696
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Sun Dec 15, 13 7:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Hanging certainly makes a difference but it's only one of several factors. You pick your breed, you pick your feeding regime, and how you treat the meat immediately before, and after death, and finally before cooking. Vac packing, for example, does very few favours for a small joint.

Rob R



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 31902
Location: York
PostPosted: Sun Dec 15, 13 7:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Oh, it certainly makes a difference, I just think the difference is overrated, and it's entirely a modern invention, not a traditional one.

oldish chris



Joined: 14 Jun 2006
Posts: 4148
Location: Comfortably Wet Southport
PostPosted: Sun Dec 15, 13 9:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Nick wrote:
Is there, potentially, a difference in the hanging times, maybe?
I made the mistake of trying to discuss this with a scouse butcher. He put his hands on his hips and stated "I can assure you that everything in this shop is well hung!"

But apart from that, I have had the occasional disappointment with supermarket meat, and the occasional bit of meat from the local butcher that was exceptional. (But so far, not vice versa.) Then there is the treat of older breeds, saddleback pig, longhorn cattle.

S'pose its more to do with politics and trying to keep my money local.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8919

PostPosted: Mon Dec 16, 13 7:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

The places I buy my meat from don't supply supermarkets as they sell all the meat they produce as far as I know. There are all sorts of factors; feed, breed, growing time etc. as you say.

The main reason I buy where I do is that I know where the meat comes from and how the animals are treated and reared. Started there during the BSE scare, and was told if I wanted to see how the cows were fed, just walk up the path. They do put them in a barn in winter, but think they mainly feed them on their own hay and use plant based feed as they are not trying to finish them fast.

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