Home Page
   Articles
       links
About Us    
Traders        
Recipes            
Latest Articles
if you had room for one more tree
Page 1, 2, 3, 4  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Downsizer Forum Index -> Grow Your Own
Author 
 Message
Nicky Colour it green



Joined: 25 Jun 2007
Posts: 8698
Location: Devon, uk
PostPosted: Wed Jul 30, 14 2:40 pm    Post subject: if you had room for one more tree  Reply with quote    

..in the orchard, what would you choose?

We have bramley, and sunset apples, pears, Dittisham, Victoria and Majory Seedling plums, gages, mirabelle, an almond. Tried and failed to grow quince....

Andy B



Joined: 12 Jan 2005
Posts: 3920
Location: Brum
PostPosted: Wed Jul 30, 14 3:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

How about a Walnut?

perlogalism



Joined: 27 Nov 2009
Posts: 440
Location: Near Welshpool
PostPosted: Wed Jul 30, 14 3:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Apricot


NorthernMonkeyGirl



Joined: 10 Apr 2011
Posts: 4357
Location: Peeping over your shoulder
PostPosted: Wed Jul 30, 14 3:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Mulberry

OtleyLad



Joined: 13 Jan 2007
Posts: 2737
Location: Otley, West Yorkshire
PostPosted: Wed Jul 30, 14 4:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

NorthernMonkeyGirl wrote:
Mulberry


Me too.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 36077
Location: yes
PostPosted: Wed Jul 30, 14 4:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

quince went out of fashion for a good reason

i would probably go for russet or an old style pear

Nicky Colour it green



Joined: 25 Jun 2007
Posts: 8698
Location: Devon, uk
PostPosted: Wed Jul 30, 14 4:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

walnut - isn't there something about them poisoning the ground?

apricot - I'm afraid apricots are one of the few foods I don't eat (I don't eat tripe either but I don't think there is a tripe tree)

mulberry is good. Which kind do you need for silk worms? what do you do with mulberries?

another pear could be good...

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44302
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Wed Jul 30, 14 5:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Nicky Colour it green wrote:
walnut - isn't there something about them poisoning the ground?


Overstated I think

Quote:
apricot - I'm afraid apricots are one of the few foods I don't eat (I don't eat tripe either but I don't think there is a tripe tree)


A really ripe one is awesome, nothing like what you can buy

Quote:
mulberry is good. Which kind do you need for silk worms? what do you do with mulberries?


Black mulberries ripen over a period so usually only enough to eat fresh, but we have lost our entire crop to wasps this year

Quote:
another pear could be good...


We harvested Jargonelle yesterday, crisp with a lot more acidity than most pears, delish.

Depending on how sheltered you are loquats are good (see plenty cropping in London gardens), very tasty fruit.

Our kaki persimmons are also doing well but not cropped yet.

Chestnuts are very attractive trees and should do well for you

Morello cherry is the best jam ever, but you will need to net

Figs would also be great, again nothing like what you can buy in the shops (unless you have a Turkish shop nearby)

Nicky Colour it green



Joined: 25 Jun 2007
Posts: 8698
Location: Devon, uk
PostPosted: Wed Jul 30, 14 6:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

thanks for the suggestions -

cherry - thought about that but it might have to be in the garden so i can net it

chestnut - have planted one in the 'woodland', might put some more in the hedges as we don't have any.

I like the sound of the pear - I'm trying to convert mr Cig who thinks pears are all gritty - have planted a Beure de something that says it isn't and have fruit on it.. so maybe.

Fig we have one, and my parents have an ancient tree and the press lots of figs on us in a good year.

I really like the sound of the loquat again might be better for the garden as more sheltered

hmmm lots to think on

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44302
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Wed Jul 30, 14 6:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Nicky Colour it green wrote:
I like the sound of the pear - I'm trying to convert mr Cig who thinks pears are all gritty


Jargonelle is 100% non gritty

Quote:
I really like the sound of the loquat again might be better for the garden as more sheltered


Have you seen one? It's sold as an ornamental mostly in the UK as it's winter flowering; evergreen with deeply veined leaves, will look nice in the garden. It'll do wherever, but will need shelter to fruit

Hairyloon



Joined: 20 Nov 2008
Posts: 15379
Location: Today I are mostly being in Yorkshire.
PostPosted: Wed Jul 30, 14 6:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

http://forum.downsizer.net/about82480.html

wellington womble



Joined: 08 Nov 2004
Posts: 14976
Location: East Midlands
PostPosted: Wed Jul 30, 14 6:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I don't have any fruit trees, and I don't like raw fruit. But if I were going to choose one it would be a morello cherry. You can't buy them anywhere, and they make such lovely desserts.

Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Wed Jul 30, 14 7:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

A good damson. They make a great jam and wine.

Nicky Colour it green



Joined: 25 Jun 2007
Posts: 8698
Location: Devon, uk
PostPosted: Wed Jul 30, 14 8:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Treacodactyl wrote:
A good damson. They make a great jam and wine.


oops - forgot to say we have 2 of these - I recommend damson vodka

Nicky Colour it green



Joined: 25 Jun 2007
Posts: 8698
Location: Devon, uk
PostPosted: Wed Jul 30, 14 8:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

tahir wrote:
Nicky Colour it green wrote:
I like the sound of the pear - I'm trying to convert mr Cig who thinks pears are all gritty


Jargonelle is 100% non gritty
liking the sound of that

[quote= Nicky]I really like the sound of the loquat again might be better for the garden as more sheltered[/quote]

tahir wrote:
Have you seen one? It's sold as an ornamental mostly in the UK as it's winter flowering; evergreen with deeply veined leaves, will look nice in the garden. It'll do wherever, but will need shelter to fruit


Not seen one noI really like the sound of it...need to read up how well it would do - pretty mild here but can be very windy and wet as well, as I'm on the edge of Dartmoor. more reading needed.

Post new topic   Reply to topic    Downsizer Forum Index -> Grow Your Own All times are GMT
Page 1, 2, 3, 4  Next
Page 1 of 4
View Latest Posts View Latest Posts

 

Archive
Powered by php-BB © 2001, 2005 php-BB Group
Style by marsjupiter.com, released under GNU (GNU/GPL) license.
Copyright 2004 marsjupiter.com