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Pear identification
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joanne



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 7095
Location: Morecambe, Lancashire
PostPosted: Sun Sep 14, 14 2:11 pm    Post subject: Pear identification  Reply with quote    

Does anyone know what variety of pear these might be? They are tiny but the tree is laden although they are still not ready

I want them to use for chutneys, perry and jam



LynneA



Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 4893
Location: London N21
PostPosted: Sun Sep 14, 14 6:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

A perry variety?

Green Rosie



Joined: 13 May 2007
Posts: 10498
Location: Calvados, France
PostPosted: Sun Sep 14, 14 6:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I was going to say a perry variety - like this tree I saw on my walk today


Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 11279

PostPosted: Mon Sep 15, 14 6:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

It could also be an old type. We had one at the end of our garden, but the neighbours between them seem to have done for it. It was very tall and had quite small fruit that I used for cooking.

joanne



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 7095
Location: Morecambe, Lancashire
PostPosted: Mon Sep 15, 14 7:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I thought it might be a perry variety as well - that's great news because that's what it's mainly going to be used for anyway

It is very old, the property is listed and the size of the tree means it must be atleast 100 years old if not more

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44302
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Mon Sep 15, 14 8:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

We've got a very similar looking pear, label's come off though. We harvested on Staurday, v clean and refreshing taste, v juicy. If I manage to work out what it was I'll let you know

Luath



Joined: 03 Dec 2009
Posts: 758

PostPosted: Mon Sep 15, 14 9:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Could be Black Worcester; an old cooking variety.

joanne



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 7095
Location: Morecambe, Lancashire
PostPosted: Mon Sep 15, 14 9:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Oooh Luath, I think you might be onto something there. It's definitely similar and definitely a very old variety, more than likely pre-Victorian

Does anyone have an email contact for OrangePippin? I wonder if he knows somebody who could identify it properly for us especially if it is a rare heritage variety

There are quite a few apple trees as well in the grounds of the house although I think they are quite a bit younger

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44302
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Mon Sep 15, 14 9:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

OP and his chums are pretty much apple obsessives, I'll skype him and see if he knows anyone

mochyn



Joined: 21 Dec 2004
Posts: 24569
Location: mid-Wales
PostPosted: Mon Sep 15, 14 10:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I was looking at a tree of Black Worcesters yesterday and the fruit was much bigger than those, Jo.

joanne



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 7095
Location: Morecambe, Lancashire
PostPosted: Mon Sep 15, 14 10:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I've contacted the Northern Fruit Group and the Heritage Pear project at the Orchard Revival website.

There are some apple varieties in the grounds of the house as well as, although I think they may be later but again we've no idea what variety they might be. One's definitely an eater and I think the others are cookers but again we aren't sure what they are.

Thanks Tahir - any help would be great especially if it is a 'lost' variety it needs preserving there is also a conference type and two williams type pears

joanne



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 7095
Location: Morecambe, Lancashire
PostPosted: Mon Sep 15, 14 10:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

mochyn wrote:
I was looking at a tree of Black Worcesters yesterday and the fruit was much bigger than those, Jo.


I wonder if they are a relative though, especially as the house is from the 1700's or earlier I think. Christian's sister and her partner renovated it from almost rubble, these are the apple and pears that they managed to save, the gardens were completely overgrown and there were many more fruit trees but alot had to be removed as they were full of disease.

Lorrainelovesplants



Joined: 13 Oct 2006
Posts: 6517
Location: Dordogne
PostPosted: Mon Sep 15, 14 10:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Its a perry pear - we also have a massive tree with wooden pears. If you pick them and put by a fruitbowl for a week they soften up, but are never truly nice to eat.

Luath



Joined: 03 Dec 2009
Posts: 758

PostPosted: Mon Sep 15, 14 11:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

mochyn wrote:
I was looking at a tree of Black Worcesters yesterday and the fruit was much bigger than those, Jo.


Fruits will diminish in size over a long life time of a fruit tree.

Definitely not medlars, btw.

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44302
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Mon Sep 15, 14 11:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Jo are they all the same shape (round with a little point?), they are v similar to ours, and we don't have any perry pears.

Either way it's going to be a pre 19th C pear as by then they were much bigger and different shapes

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