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Dogfish
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sally_in_wales
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Joined: 06 Mar 2005
Posts: 20809
Location: sunny wales
PostPosted: Sat Aug 03, 13 6:59 am    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

Northern Boy wrote:
sally_in_wales wrote:
if they'd get here before they go completely ick, I'm game!


Seriously, if you want some, we can keep them next time we're out. If you're in S.Wales then it's no hassle to get them to you.


yes please! We're in Mountain Ash, so between Pontypridd and Aberdare

Treacodactyl
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Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Sat Aug 03, 13 7:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I would have thought they would work ok in a fish curry?

I've not caught any, but released a couple caught up in old fishing tackle.

What would be a good way to catch them from a gently sloping, rocky beach? Simple running ledger and a bit of fish bait? I assume they don't go much for lures of any sort?

Boy Wonder



Joined: 27 May 2008
Posts: 496

PostPosted: Sat Aug 03, 13 7:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

BW has caught them off Bucks. I'll get him to post what they used.

eta Seeing as he's already logged in

Treacodactyl
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Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Sat Aug 03, 13 7:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Thank you, and also what time of day? I'm assuming evening fishing would be best?

RichardW



Joined: 24 Aug 2006
Posts: 8417
Location: Llyn Peninsular North Wales
PostPosted: Sat Aug 03, 13 8:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Treacodactyl wrote:

What would be a good way to catch them from a gently sloping, rocky beach? Simple running ledger and a bit of fish bait? I assume they don't go much for lures of any sort?


The standard method seems to be:-

try for any other fish type & you will catch dogfish instead.

Treacodactyl
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Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Sat Aug 03, 13 9:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

RichardW wrote:
Treacodactyl wrote:

What would be a good way to catch them from a gently sloping, rocky beach? Simple running ledger and a bit of fish bait? I assume they don't go much for lures of any sort?


The standard method seems to be:-

try for any other fish type & you will catch dogfish instead.


That does seem to be the case although I tend to use lures or cast in shallow water for bass, so avoid/miss them.

mochyn



Joined: 21 Dec 2004
Posts: 24551
Location: mid-Wales
PostPosted: Sat Aug 03, 13 9:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

sally_in_wales wrote:
if its the sort of dogfish with the nice sandpapery skins, I'd love to barter for a few skins (just peel them off and salt them dry, I can deal with them from there), we use the skins when doing displays on prehistoric tools


And if there's a REAL surfeit, I'd like a skin too! Please.

Northern Boy



Joined: 04 Oct 2010
Posts: 976

PostPosted: Sat Aug 03, 13 6:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Treacodactyl wrote:
RichardW wrote:
Treacodactyl wrote:

What would be a good way to catch them from a gently sloping, rocky beach? Simple running ledger and a bit of fish bait? I assume they don't go much for lures of any sort?


The standard method seems to be:-

try for any other fish type & you will catch dogfish instead.


That does seem to be the case although I tend to use lures or cast in shallow water for bass, so avoid/miss them.


Any sort of bait will get them, and I've even had them on feathers. Running ledger, flapper, anything, any time of day.

Northern Boy



Joined: 04 Oct 2010
Posts: 976

PostPosted: Sat Aug 03, 13 6:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

mochyn wrote:
sally_in_wales wrote:
if its the sort of dogfish with the nice sandpapery skins, I'd love to barter for a few skins (just peel them off and salt them dry, I can deal with them from there), we use the skins when doing displays on prehistoric tools


And if there's a REAL surfeit, I'd like a skin too! Please.


Next time we're out we'll keep a few and send some PMs.

mochyn



Joined: 21 Dec 2004
Posts: 24551
Location: mid-Wales
PostPosted: Sun Aug 04, 13 4:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Yes please, NB. We use them in Fifteenth Century work.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 33088
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon Aug 05, 13 8:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

as above if they are about they will bite most things

nail the head to a plank it helps with skinning as do pliers .with a bit of effort they can be peeled like an eel

Spider



Joined: 17 Apr 2013
Posts: 129
Location: Rhondda Valleys....Welshland
PostPosted: Mon Aug 05, 13 8:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I always used pliers for skinning them, but don't fancy the idea of nailing their heads to a plank. Just can't bare the thought of watching them wriggling while nailed there, it's bad enough watching bits of them wriggling on the chopping board and in the frying pan when cooking....still worth the hassle, better still if you can get someone else to do it

Treacodactyl
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Joined: 28 Oct 2004
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 02, 14 8:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

RichardW wrote:
Slightly freaky that its still wriggling hours after its dead & even when skinned gutted & filleted it is still moving.


That's good to know. I've just prepped my first one, initially I thought I hadn't killed it completely when caught as it kept wriggling. But then it kept wriggling after I'd gutted it and cut its head off and then after I'd skinned it...

I didn't find it that easy to skin using pliers, the skin kept braking off and the body flying off in the other direction - I think I've clean up all the blood...

Now I just need a few good recipes, they do seem very easy to catch. Looking at it's stomach contents it had feasted on a crab and bits of old bait I'd thrown into the sea about 10 minutes before I caught it!

Northern Boy



Joined: 04 Oct 2010
Posts: 976

PostPosted: Fri Oct 03, 14 7:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Treacodactyl wrote:
RichardW wrote:
Slightly freaky that its still wriggling hours after its dead & even when skinned gutted & filleted it is still moving.


That's good to know. I've just prepped my first one, initially I thought I hadn't killed it completely when caught as it kept wriggling. But then it kept wriggling after I'd gutted it and cut its head off and then after I'd skinned it...

I didn't find it that easy to skin using pliers, the skin kept braking off and the body flying off in the other direction - I think I've clean up all the blood...

Now I just need a few good recipes, they do seem very easy to catch. Looking at it's stomach contents it had feasted on a crab and bits of old bait I'd thrown into the sea about 10 minutes before I caught it!


My favourite is Doggie Dogs - basically an american fried fish sandwich with the dogfish either breaded or battered and then fried, served in a hot dog bun , with lettuce, tomato, onion, tartare sauce and burger pickles.

One thing we have noticed is a large variation in the taste and texture. The best ones taste like decent whitefish, in the cod/pollack class, but with a firmer texture. Many taste of sod all and are a bit mushy. Some taste grim and almost dissolve on cooking. I suspect this is largely just the natural variation one would expect in a wild animal. There is also the fact that they are elasmobranchs - some people say that you either have to bleed and ice immediately, eating soon after, or else ice and wait 48-72 hours. Anything in between and you get an ammonia taste polluting the meat. I can't say we have noticed this much (or as much as we have with skates/rays), but it's probably worth considering.

Treacodactyl
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Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Fri Oct 03, 14 9:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Well I tried the old strips of fish, lightly floured with s&p, and fried in a little oil.

Flavour wise they were fine, nothing wrong but not a huge amount of taste. Texture wise they were a little rubbery, although that may have been my cooking. I did cut the spine out first.

Overall I think it's worth the time and trying some other recipes. I expect they'd go well with sauces and pickles.

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