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Plastic pipe fittings
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Dee J



Joined: 22 May 2005
Posts: 342
Location: West Devon
PostPosted: Wed Mar 04, 15 12:47 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

Mostly Speedfit here, odd bits of HEP and some copper... It all works. Plastic is very good for retro fit in old houses because it can be threaded through holes where rigid copper needs joists notched. Only real issue is the amount of thermal expansion in plastic pipes on hot services. It will move a lot. So don't clamp plastic too solidly and don't use plastic for exposed long runs where a nice neat straight pipe is needed. Temporary radiator install during refurbishment had about 20' of pipe clipped along a skirting. Straight when cold, but transformed into sid snake when hot!

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 37354
Location: yes
PostPosted: Wed Mar 04, 15 1:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

what they said

all i can add is what you gain on flexibility you lose on the extra clips etc to stop sagging etc

we have some in the central heating that i didnt fit but they seem ok on a pressurized system.

the few times i have had to use them clean and tidy pipe ends and tight but not too tight on the fittings if they are the turn sort seems to have worked fine

they are easier than copper end feed or compression but i still prefer copper which is probably an undeserved prejudice against plastic

perlogalism



Joined: 27 Nov 2009
Posts: 440
Location: Near Welshpool
PostPosted: Wed Mar 04, 15 1:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I've used a variety and found the Hep2O to be easiest to use and adjust. None of it has been in any longer than 6 years so ' can't really comment on longevity

Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 34230
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Wed Mar 04, 15 1:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Conversely, mine are at least 15 years old, and trouble free, on hot and cold.

But, I cannot tell you the make. And they're pumped, not on mains pressure.

sean
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 42067
Location: North Devon
PostPosted: Wed Mar 04, 15 1:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I've looked ours up. They're Speedfit. Up to eleven years old so far.

Rob R



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 31902
Location: York
PostPosted: Wed Mar 04, 15 1:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Mostly speedfit here too, athough a couple of cheaper fittings here & there.

vegplot



Joined: 19 Apr 2007
Posts: 21298
Location: Ynys Môn
PostPosted: Wed Mar 04, 15 1:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

We have them mainly on the pumped hot water circuit and cold mains for the bathroom which is a relatively recent fit (in the last 5 years or so).

Cathryn



Joined: 16 Jul 2005
Posts: 19856
Location: Ceredigion
PostPosted: Wed Mar 04, 15 1:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

We use both and thank goodness have replaced all our copper pipes they developed tiny pinholes everywhere.

We also use the bigger blue pipe for long runs of cold water. It works just as well and is cheaper.

If it's very acidic you might need a filter - a big tank filled with something similar to limestone that gets changed every two years here.

(Copper pipes, acidic water and highlighted hair = green hair.)

RichardW



Joined: 24 Aug 2006
Posts: 8442
Location: Llyn Peninsular North Wales
PostPosted: Wed Mar 04, 15 3:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Top tip,

Dont be tight buy the proper cutter.

I know you have a hack saw that could do the job for free but you then either get joints that leak or have to spend time trying to clean up the cut for a joint that will still leak.

The only time I have had problems is when I could not be bothered to go get the cutter & used the saw instead.

Oh & use the inserts if the brand you are using needs them.

Also use the dismantleable type (HEP2O used not to be, not sure if they are now).

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 37354
Location: yes
PostPosted: Wed Mar 04, 15 4:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

seconded on the proper pipe cutter ,it makes them easier to push into place as well as giving a dry job .

vertical runs of hot water between upstairs and loft or downstairs need plenty of clips as they seem to get extra baggy ,i think i did ours to 200mm centers cos the 800 that had been done looked very wobbly when things warmed up.if between joists the same applies but 350 centres seems ok

Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Wed Mar 04, 15 7:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Thanks for the replies. I'd certainly use the correct tools and follow the instructions.

I don't plan on using them on mains water pressure pipes, but might have a pump in the system.

I assume I could still use copper on the radiator/boiler system and the inhibitor should prevent acid damage?

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 37354
Location: yes
PostPosted: Wed Mar 04, 15 8:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

tis always a good idea to use the anti oxidant /anti acid /anti lime additives as appropriate in ch systems and copper is fine for most water types and purposes

ps fernox is a decent make of additives but iirc screwfix "own brand" stuff is ok as well

Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 34230
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Wed Mar 04, 15 8:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

B&Q own brand work fine on all our pumps. Put in extra flow valves because the pumps die often enough for it to be a pain otherwise.

Last edited by Nick on Wed Mar 04, 15 8:56 pm; edited 1 time in total

earthyvirgo



Joined: 24 Aug 2007
Posts: 7972
Location: creating prints in the loft, Gerlan
PostPosted: Wed Mar 04, 15 8:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

vegplot wrote:
The push type fittings are good but you do need to make very clean scratch free connections to ensure their long term integrity. If you do use them it's advisable to be able to have good easy access wherever the joins are just in case of failure.

I wouldn't use plastic inside a house if the join is difficult to get at. A good copper fitting will give much longer problem free service than a plastic one assuming you don't have problems like you suggest e.g. acidic water.


What did Mark the Plumber say about the problem in Water Street?
I thought he'd given plastic fittings the no-no.
...or was that a particular type.

EV

Gervase



Joined: 17 Nov 2004
Posts: 8655

PostPosted: Wed Mar 04, 15 10:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Thirded on the cutter, and don't be tempted to skimp on the end inserts if you're connecting the plastic pipe to a compression joint. I've used Speedfit and HEP2O and have to say the HEP is easier to work with and seems more consistently made.
If you're using them on a heating system, make sure you get the barrier pipes with a metal gas-proof layer.

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