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pip22



Joined: 15 Mar 2015
Posts: 14
Location: Brittany
PostPosted: Sun Mar 15, 15 2:18 pm    Post subject: compost Reply with quote
    

Hi all, I'm thinking of getting some compost from the local dump to use on the veg patch but unsure as to whether the heat will have killed unwanted seeds/weeds etc

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 38885
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sun Mar 15, 15 2:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

probably if it was done well.

a bigger risk is "toxic"ingredients such as herbicide residues,i had a batch in bags that would kill anything planted in it ,seeds failed to grow and plants fell dead .

onemanband



Joined: 26 Dec 2010
Posts: 1473
Location: NCA90
PostPosted: Sun Mar 15, 15 3:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

I wouldn't use it - at least not on veg.
Who knows what other people throw in their recycling bin.
I also do some hedge cutting and tree work. I tip it at a composting facility(same place as council stuff goes to). The majority of stuff tipped is leylandii and not everyone is as conscientious as me, so you do see bits of fencing and general rubbish amongst it. And there's probably some chain saw oil in there aswell.

pip22



Joined: 15 Mar 2015
Posts: 14
Location: Brittany
PostPosted: Sun Mar 15, 15 7:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Thanks both; sounds like i'd better give it a miss and look elsewhere

Tavascarow



Joined: 06 Aug 2006
Posts: 8407
Location: South Cornwall
PostPosted: Sun Mar 15, 15 7:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Check out local riding stables, they very often have big piles of well rotted, & glad to get rid.
The municipal composts I've seen vary a great deal. All right to use as a mulch around ornamentals but probably not the best for soil improving.

Tavascarow



Joined: 06 Aug 2006
Posts: 8407
Location: South Cornwall
PostPosted: Sun Mar 15, 15 7:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

& welcome to Downsizer from me down in thev deep dark South West.

pip22



Joined: 15 Mar 2015
Posts: 14
Location: Brittany
PostPosted: Sun Mar 15, 15 7:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Thanks Tavascarow

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 38885
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sun Mar 15, 15 9:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

ps some horse compost has been made from things that have been treated with herbicides

hippy looking but good science

im not sure what the solution to this problem is but being careful as to what you add to your soil by knowing what it was before it was compost is a good idea .

if possible make your own

Tavascarow



Joined: 06 Aug 2006
Posts: 8407
Location: South Cornwall
PostPosted: Sun Mar 15, 15 10:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Mother earth news is an American site & that page was from February/March 2013.
Aminopyralid herbicide had its UK licence suspended & although it's since been reinstated, there are restrictions to its use. Worth checking with stables to see what/if they have sprayed. Or get a bag or two & do a test grow with some Toms or potatoes before you dig it in.

oldish chris



Joined: 14 Jun 2006
Posts: 4148
Location: Comfortably Wet Southport
PostPosted: Mon Mar 16, 15 12:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

A few years back, my allotment assoc was given a talk (and 30 tonnes) about ex-bin collection re-cycled compost.

The raw compost is checked (e.g. for used nappies) and if contaminated, rejected. The compost is mixed (brown and green) and stacked into middens, periodically turned. The processors will have ensured that the correct temperatures have been achieved and maintained. The finished product is checked for bio-problems such as Phytophthera.

I have used it as a weed suppressant, i.e. weighing down a layer of newspaper.

You will find in the compost small fragments of glass and plastic. No-one mentions any consequences of the huge amount of Leylandii foliage in the mix.

gregotyn



Joined: 24 Jun 2010
Posts: 2173
Location: Llanfyllin area
PostPosted: Mon Mar 16, 15 2:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

I stopped using the cheap garden own branded composts after I cut my hand on a large piece of glass, whilest doing seed planting.

Tavascarow



Joined: 06 Aug 2006
Posts: 8407
Location: South Cornwall
PostPosted: Mon Mar 16, 15 2:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

gregotyn wrote:
I stopped using the cheap garden own branded composts after I cut my hand on a large piece of glass, whilest doing seed planting.

It's not just the cheap brands. All potting composts have to include a percentage of composted green waste now. The better ones probably screen & grade better than the cheap but the days of 100% spagnum moss peat composts are long gone.

gregotyn



Joined: 24 Jun 2010
Posts: 2173
Location: Llanfyllin area
PostPosted: Tue Mar 17, 15 2:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

That's why I now pay for the regular brands, Fisons and the like rather than the supermarkets' own brand!

LynneA



Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 4893
Location: London N21
PostPosted: Wed Mar 18, 15 1:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Never look a gist horse - but certain provisos for compost etc.

We get free municipal compost at the allotments - quality varies. Last year one batch was extremely acidic, and may have also contained bindweed roots. I treated myself to a ph / moisture meter to test any new batches.

We get free manure deliveries from the riding school up the road. Sometimes comes with little extras:
https://forum.downsizer.net/about28488.html&highlight=what+happened+to+little+timmy

Someone else on site know a tree surgeon, so wood chippings for paths are sorted.

Add to that our chicken bedding to add to general composting, we're well provided for.

One thing to consider with stable/farm manure is the effect of worming treatments. I usually leave it to rot down for a few weeks, even if I'm told it's well rotted.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 38885
Location: yes
PostPosted: Wed Mar 18, 15 1:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

i did a thought experiment and recon my 300 litres of peat based (ie no toxins this time)that i have just ordered is a "greenish"option.

it will make the basis of permanent box beds on the ,sunny, top of the woodstore.
with home made added (we have guineapigs but very little space and urban rats so a mini wormery might help)it will be a sustainable soil.

the "green"option of using the non peat collected n fermented stuff led to buying salad,herbs,(ed) rather than (ed)small space /3d veg etc cos it killed all my plants.

the peat comes from the past and the landscape of a bit of ireland will be changed for ever but it will become part of a sustainable future here and it is far better than flying basil from kenya to york etc etc.

these "which is greenest" equations can be rather surprising .

Last edited by dpack on Wed Mar 18, 15 2:52 pm; edited 1 time in total

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