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bathroom light switch - inside or outside?
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OtleyLad



Joined: 13 Jan 2007
Posts: 2737
Location: Otley, West Yorkshire
PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 15 7:11 am    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

Graham Hyde wrote:
Don't know about current wiring reg's but in my day light switches were not allowed in bathrooms.


You're right but pull cords are ok.

Woo



Joined: 19 Sep 2011
Posts: 780
Location: Mayenne, Pays de Loire
PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 15 8:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

we have put the switch outside on our first finished bathroom here.
in our old house we had a mix. the ensuite had an outside the room switch and a shaver light inside. yes there were times it was seen as highly amusing to switch off the light. how I laughed!
the main bathroom had a pull cord and it drove me mad.
I would make a loud clunk every time the children went in, never on leaving and it would ricochet off the mirror. (thwang, bash).
when we moved out the cord was grubby too .
all that put me off the whole cord thing. and it didn't really fit in so well with our design. ( for that read didn't give it a thought till it was too late.)
I am considering sensors for the kids rooms. that or a recording of, "FLUSH THE TOILET, WASH YOUR HANDS, TURN THAT LIGHT OUT!" I feel like an ARP warden!
As to the putting the light on with wet hands. not sure that is such a challenge? I usually grab a towel before I do anything else while wet anyway and you could get an outdoor switch if it worried you?

Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 33857
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 15 8:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Shan wrote:
I think pull cords are unhygienic!


What are you doing with them?

Graham Hyde



Joined: 03 Apr 2011
Posts: 365

PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 15 8:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Electrical regs were put together for safety being upgraded regularly.
The problem is not only wet hands but dampness through steam etc and also difference of potential.
There was also restrictions on the placement of sockets in kitchens.
It is wise not to flaunt the regs and no bona fide spark would; It could result in a custodial sentence!

Nicky Colour it green



Joined: 25 Jun 2007
Posts: 8693
Location: Devon, uk
PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 15 12:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

There is plenty of opportunity for steam, water and wet hands in a kitchen, yet we are allowed normal light and socket switches there.... doesn't make so much sense to me

Graham Hyde



Joined: 03 Apr 2011
Posts: 365

PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 15 12:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

There are restrictions in a kitchen as I noted as to the placing of electrical points, switches, sockets, etc.
There are lots of practical guides to the regs if you need a laymans version.
Every certified electrician has to be certified with the latest regulations to continue to work, it was up to the 17th edition at my last update.
The editions are up graded frequently (the colour of the regulation book denoting the sub edition); a new edition is issued when a considerable change is needed.
I was also qualified on commercial gas, that required a bi-annual certification with a 100% score required. When this regulation came in a lot of elderly gas fitters retired as they were not confident taking exams, competent gas fitters but not exam takers.
Electrical certification is a lot easier and an edition upgrade is usually a one day C$G course.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 34285
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 15 12:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

the dirty cord issue can be solved with a wipe clean terminal.we have a ceramic "shrunken cat" but non whack versions in wood or plastic are available for folk who swing etc.

the regs for bathrooms are partly intended to avoid feet in the water/wet floor and hand on the live (or live in condensation)circuits.

kitchen regs assume you have dry feet and so are to prevent live hand ,tap hand circuits.

the thing that puzzles me about bathroom regs is they allow a socket for shavers or toothbrush charges either of which has the ability to connect the person to the basin/bath i know they are low amp fittings but they still pack a punch .

Graham Hyde



Joined: 03 Apr 2011
Posts: 365

PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 15 12:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Your right Dpack, kitchens rely on distance to isolate from the possible earth fault return path through tap water fittings.
Certified, approved shaver sockets included an isolation transformer so are deemed safe.
My certification is well out of date now so I recommend a check on the current regs for anyone doing electrical upgrades.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 34285
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 15 2:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

iirc in parts of the uk the building regs(electrical stuff) were partially altered from the basically good 17th ed electrical rules and have now mostly returned to the 17th ed rules.

the building regs and the electrical regs have sometimes conflicted .

the new rules about test certificates are both good and bad ,good as it should prevent bad installations ,bad cos it cant and both diy and cowboy stuff can be installed previously and are not subject to any test unless they are altered or mended.

a full test every few years in order to have a supply from the grid would find all the old and dangeroos stuff.
i have found live and in use stuff that was installed pre ww1 recently and stuff installed recently with at least one life threatening fault per metre run

Nicky Colour it green



Joined: 25 Jun 2007
Posts: 8693
Location: Devon, uk
PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 15 2:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

dpack wrote:

kitchen regs assume you have dry feet and so are to prevent live hand ,tap hand circuits. .


ah good point.


just for clarity, we have no intention of doing anything other than following the regulations, just pondering which of the options to go for.

Shan



Joined: 13 Jan 2009
Posts: 7580
Location: South Wales
PostPosted: Sun Apr 05, 15 7:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Nick wrote:
Shan wrote:
I think pull cords are unhygienic!


What are you doing with them?


I don't know that everyone else washes their hands!

Nicky Colour it green



Joined: 25 Jun 2007
Posts: 8693
Location: Devon, uk
PostPosted: Sun Apr 05, 15 1:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Shan wrote:
Nick wrote:
Shan wrote:
I think pull cords are unhygienic!


What are you doing with them?


I don't know that everyone else washes their hands!


surely the same argument stands for either a light cord or switch?

Shan



Joined: 13 Jan 2009
Posts: 7580
Location: South Wales
PostPosted: Mon Apr 06, 15 7:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I can use my elbow to knock off the light switch.

onemanband



Joined: 26 Dec 2010
Posts: 1473
Location: NCA90
PostPosted: Mon Apr 06, 15 12:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Shan wrote:
I can use my elbow to knock off the light switch.


Can you open and close the door with your elbow ? or hold the stair banister with your elbow ? or answer the phone ? or ............etc... etc

Shan



Joined: 13 Jan 2009
Posts: 7580
Location: South Wales
PostPosted: Mon Apr 06, 15 7:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

You would be surprised.

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