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Behemoth



Joined: 01 Dec 2004
Posts: 19023
Location: Leeds
PostPosted: Tue Jun 16, 15 2:07 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

No, I've deployed an attractive but vigorous climbing rose.

Hairyloon



Joined: 20 Nov 2008
Posts: 15084
Location: Today I are mostly being in Yorkshire.
PostPosted: Tue Jun 16, 15 2:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Behemoth wrote:
No, I've deployed an attractive but vigorous climbing rose.

A curious and evil strategy...

Bodger



Joined: 23 May 2006
Posts: 13500

PostPosted: Tue Jun 16, 15 5:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I've just got this back from an enquiry with the forestry Commission.


TREE HEALTH DIAGNOSTIC & ADVISORY SERVICE

Hi John,

Further to our telephone call, I have attached our information sheet on honey fungus and our sampling guide for Phytophthora to give you an idea what you are looking for.

You need to peel back the bark with a chisel or knife where the lesions meet healthy tissue. If you find a white fungal sheet growing beneath the bark that will confirm honey fungus. On page 5 of the honey fungus guide the mycelium, or fungal tissue, is clearly evident beneath the bark of an affected tree. Should you confirm it, the best course of action is to remove the tree. If you wish to replace it, the list of less susceptible plants in the leaflet may be helpful. However, if there is no evidence of white mycelium and the plant tissue is just dead, Phytophthora might be the cause. This is a microscopic organism which will not be visible with the naked eye.

Unfortunately in the case of both these root pathogens, the prognosis for the tree is poor. Ideally you would remove the tree and if practicable, the large roots. However, this is often extremely difficult. Ultimately the key is to replant with species which are less susceptible, and if we can identify the organism involved, then it is possible to tailor replant choices.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 34457
Location: yes
PostPosted: Tue Jun 16, 15 5:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

drop it safely and make yourselves warm in winter

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 10131

PostPosted: Wed Jun 17, 15 7:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

As it is a lone tree, you might just consider not bothering with a tree there for a few years. The FC are more concerned with woodland trees, so always consider replanting. In a wood, honey fungus is always present, and it tends to go for damaged or stressed trees. We get a lot of natural regeneration, so just let them get on with it, and healthy trees seem to come up in the same place.

Falstaff



Joined: 27 May 2009
Posts: 1014

PostPosted: Wed Jun 17, 15 3:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

On the upside, if it IS Honey Fungus, there are a number of variants, or species, depending on which camp you belong to and they're good eating !

NorthernMonkeyGirl



Joined: 10 Apr 2011
Posts: 4349
Location: Peeping over your shoulder
PostPosted: Wed Jun 17, 15 8:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Behemoth wrote:
dpack wrote:
Slim wrote:
Hairyloon wrote:
larch


You mean tamarack?

We actually call them larch most of the time here.... But I could have gone with Hackmatack



would that be the first nation names?

some uk "first nation" plant names are quite good ,dur=oak and gives words such as durable,enduring etc etc


Oak being from Ac, the launguage of the Saxon oppressors who still hold the Brythonic Kingdom of Elemete in their thrall, we are the Leodis!

Anyway....a small project I'm involved in with the council required some trees to be managed. three sycamores had started to die back from the crown and were felled. Unfortunately I didnt get more than 'fungus' as the cause.

these sycamore fundamentalists, do they do contract jobs, I'd like to call a hit on a neighbour's tree.


If you declare independence before Saturday, will you let me back in without a passport?

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44159
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Thu Jun 18, 15 9:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

The latest new pest to be confirmed here:

"A Forestry Commission spokesperson said:

“The oriental chestnut gall wasp has been discovered in one area of Kent.

“This is a pest that only affects sweet chestnut (Castanea) species of tree, and does not pose any risk to people, pets or farm livestock.

“We have launched an immediate investigation of the surrounding woodland and, once we have fully assessed the situation, we will swiftly take any appropriate action.”

Key facts:

· Oriental chestnut gall wasp is a pest that affects species of sweet chestnut tree. Only European sweet chestnut (Castanea sativa) is grown in significant numbers in Britain, and no other tree species in Britain is affected.

· The Forestry Commission is undertaking a full survey and analysis to determine the scale of the current outbreak and the potential cause of the outbreak.

· Once we have fully assessed the situation, we will swiftly take any appropriate action.

· Oriental chestnut gall wasp is a threat to sweet chestnuts in several regions of the world. It reduces nut production and can weaken the tree, leaving it vulnerable to other diseases.

· The UK has Protected Zone Status against this pest, and the plant health services must be notified of all pending imports of sweet chestnut planting material before its arrival in the UK so that a proportion can be inspected.

· As part of investigations into the outbreak, the new Observatree group of trained volunteers have agreed to help survey more widely for evidence of the pest.


A full statement has been published on our website at www.forestry.gov.uk/gallwasp, and will be updated as the situation evolves. The affected woodland is Farningham Woods, near Sevenoaks, Kent."

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 34457
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu Jun 18, 15 10:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

did the georgian and victorian "plant hunters" import a variety of pests that went on to attack plants that had been here for ages?

i've not heard of it,perhaps the pests/plant host died on the long sea voyage from jungle to glasshouse and garden,perhaps many plants were collected at the seed stage and so the problem was avoided.

most of the "invasive species" arrived as a nice addition to the garden but i dont recall any major "pest"imports by accident

sean
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 41915
Location: North Devon
PostPosted: Thu Jun 18, 15 11:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Phylloxera damn near wiped out the European wine industry. That's pretty major.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 34457
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu Jun 18, 15 11:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

sean wrote:
Phylloxera damn near wiped out the European wine industry. That's pretty major.


i didnt know about the yankee aphids,from what i just read some folk think it was steamship transport being swift that let them survive unlike any on sail delivered boats ,which died,in the previous few centuries.

i spose as a container can be flown in perfectly "safe"(for the beasties)conditions from any where to anywhere in less than a day this is likely to be an ongoing problem

Slim



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 5318
Location: New England (In the US of A)
PostPosted: Thu Jun 18, 15 1:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

dpack wrote:

i spose as a container can be flown in perfectly "safe"(for the beasties)conditions from any where to anywhere in less than a day this is likely to be an ongoing problem


Just a matter of time. Over here we have as of relatively recently gained: emerald ash borer, asian longhorned beetle (super scary), hemlock wooly adelgid, etc, etc.....

New ones just keep popping up. We've got a lot of new nasty agricultural/garden pests as well. Leek moth, spotted wing drosophila, etc....

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 34457
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu Jun 18, 15 1:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

the Asian longhorn beetle has shown up in the uk but it was in a small area and spraying seems to have controlled it before it spread.

Behemoth



Joined: 01 Dec 2004
Posts: 19023
Location: Leeds
PostPosted: Thu Jun 18, 15 2:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

sean wrote:
Phylloxera damn near wiped out the European wine industry. That's pretty major.

And restocked from America. The idea of "terroir" being a marketing campaign to convince the French that it wasn't the old vines (as previously claimed) but the earth and climate that made the wine.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 10131

PostPosted: Fri Jun 19, 15 4:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I hope they manage to contain that chestnut gall wasp. I know there were one or two diseases of chestnut that the FC were worried about, which is why imports of plant material were stopped.

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