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Tyre weld, et al
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dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 34276
Location: yes
PostPosted: Tue Jul 21, 15 8:22 am    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

i always use the squirty stuff in wheel barrow tyres and green slime in bike tyres.it works.

motor vehicle tyres is not my field

onemanband



Joined: 26 Dec 2010
Posts: 1473
Location: NCA90
PostPosted: Tue Jul 21, 15 8:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

The preventative/slime stuff certainly works on push bikes. I'd be dubious about the effectiveness in a steel carcassed car tyre.

The repair stuff works as it says on the tin. It won't plug massive holes. AFAIK once used on a tyre, that tyre cannot be repaired, so best not to use unless absolute emergency or if the tyre is already at end of life.

Hairyloon



Joined: 20 Nov 2008
Posts: 15048
Location: Today I are mostly being in Yorkshire.
PostPosted: Tue Jul 21, 15 8:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

The tyre in question has only a tiny hole, but in a place where it cannot be repaired (or so says the tyre dealer). It has plenty of tread so I am reluctant to accept that nothing can be done.

alison
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 29 Oct 2004
Posts: 12908
Location: North Devon
PostPosted: Tue Jul 21, 15 10:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Sorry, I only know about the mower wheels, but we have never then managed the 7 odd miles it says you need to drive once it has been squirted.

I had a puncture recently, without the spare, in my newish car.

The squirty stuff was no good, as it was a slit in the sidewall. My OH was a star and rescued me, collecting puncture, getting tyre replaced, and returning back to me. I was left with 24 chickens sitting at the side of the road whilst he did all that, on a hot day, in the middle of nowhere, but with better internet than we get at home!

I have since bought a space saver.

Falstaff



Joined: 27 May 2009
Posts: 1014

PostPosted: Tue Jul 21, 15 10:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

If you are wanting to "bodge it" HL (and I can appreciate why you would )

I'd but a piece of tyre repair rubber from a different garage - (a bit like catapult elastic) and if you can get some glue, that too - Then I'd poke it in through the hole and let the compressive force of the rubber form a seal.

Naturally I'd only use this on something non-critical - like a wheelbarrow.

SteveP



Joined: 23 Jan 2008
Posts: 155
Location: North Devon
PostPosted: Tue Jul 21, 15 10:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Hairyloon wrote:
The tyre in question has only a tiny hole, but in a place where it cannot be repaired (or so says the tyre dealer). It has plenty of tread so I am reluctant to accept that nothing can be done.


A can of the foaming goo fixed my tyre that had a blackthorn thru the side wall. It also fixed a leak around the rim. Should work if the hole is small. Anything bigger and it is probably a safety risk. Either way I didn't tell you to do it (backside covered).

Anyway, the can price is probably worth a try when compared to the price of a tyre.

Hairyloon



Joined: 20 Nov 2008
Posts: 15048
Location: Today I are mostly being in Yorkshire.
PostPosted: Tue Jul 21, 15 11:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

SteveP wrote:
Anyway, the can price is probably worth a try when compared to the price of a tyre.

That was what I figured, but the question now is: which goo?

Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Tue Jul 21, 15 11:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Hairyloon wrote:
The tyre in question has only a tiny hole, but in a place where it cannot be repaired (or so says the tyre dealer).


If it's on the side or shoulder then the goo I've got states it shouldn't be used. It also states it's only a temporary fix and drive at a max speed of 30mph.

I would expect if you had an accident you wouldn't be insured. On the other hand you might save yourself a few quid until then.

alison
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 29 Oct 2004
Posts: 12908
Location: North Devon
PostPosted: Tue Jul 21, 15 6:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

On the mower we always use Tyre Weld

RichardW



Joined: 24 Aug 2006
Posts: 8427
Location: Llyn Peninsular North Wales
PostPosted: Tue Jul 21, 15 9:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Hairyloon wrote:

but the question now is: which goo?


If this a tyre on a road going vehicle then:-

No the question is why do you not trust the advise of the professional that has told you it is unsafe to fix the hole due to its location?

By bodging this not only are you risking your own life but the lives of everyone else on the road.

Goo is a get you home or to a garage temporary fix.

If the tyre is nearly new with loads of tread & not a cheap make or cheap size then ask them about sending it away for a major repair. Expect to pay £20-£40 for this.

If this is a non road going vehicle:-

Then get some tyre repair string & a fitting kit of eBay. With enough string you can fix large holes.

Once when on a day out to a quad bike track one of our quads (the staff use only one for recover of customers quads) holed a rear tyre. The hole would take two fingers. We used string on the day as a fix so we did not have a quad down all day expecting to have to keep blowing it up. In the end the one fill of air was all it needed & we never did change the tyre or do a more perm fix as it worked so well.

GrahamH



Joined: 23 May 2015
Posts: 418

PostPosted: Tue Jul 21, 15 9:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

In the past I have bought as a DIY Repair Kit the same device used by the tyre repair shop. The kit included an awl type tool, rubber, solvent and glue.
The awl was used first to clean the hole, solvent then glue applied, rubber inserted with awl. 10 minute job.
Not for walls only tread area. I've successfully used this method on holes caused by nails.
Kit still available, enough for about 10 repairs, less than a fiver.

Hairyloon



Joined: 20 Nov 2008
Posts: 15048
Location: Today I are mostly being in Yorkshire.
PostPosted: Tue Jul 21, 15 10:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

RichardW wrote:
No the question is why do you not trust the advice of the professional that has told you it is unsafe to fix the hole due to its location?

He didn't say it wasn't safe, he said he couldn't do it.

RichardW



Joined: 24 Aug 2006
Posts: 8427
Location: Llyn Peninsular North Wales
PostPosted: Wed Jul 22, 15 7:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

No the reason he could not do it was due to the location of the hole being in a non repairable position.

The reason its a non repairable by normal methods position is due to it being unsafe.

Only the central band of the tread is fixable due to the extra stress on the repair if its on the side wall or edge of the tread.

If its unsafe for a properly fitted mushroom patch then is deadly for a bodged goo repair.

Do you really want a blow out at speed?

Yes its a pain when a new ish tyre gets damaged & is not fixable.

Its a real pain when a bodged one blows out & kills or maims you / someone else.

Either get it fixed properly via a major repair or get a new tyre. Its not worth bodging it.

vegplot



Joined: 19 Apr 2007
Posts: 21298
Location: Ynys Môn
PostPosted: Wed Jul 22, 15 10:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Balancing the cynicism of the dealer wanting to sell you a new tyre or risking a potentially life changing event I'd go for the new tyre option.

TyreWeld quote: "This product is a temporary repair only."

Falstaff



Joined: 27 May 2009
Posts: 1014

PostPosted: Wed Jul 22, 15 10:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Hairyloon wrote:
RichardW wrote:
No the question is why do you not trust the advice of the professional that has told you it is unsafe to fix the hole due to its location?

He didn't say it wasn't safe, he said he couldn't do it.


Whatever you decide, there is no way you are going to get anyone on here or elsewhere to say that a bodge is going to be safe if "the expert" has refused to bodge it already !

One of those times when you just have to take responsibility for your own decisions

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