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dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 32885
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon Aug 21, 17 10:02 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

i have found them under ledges as well but i dont recall any in vertical cracks ( such as the edges of sash windows ) or hiding on the underside of leaves nor do they seem keen on big holes like quite a few spiders maybe they worry something might join them for dinner with them on the menu

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8732

PostPosted: Tue Aug 22, 17 6:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Interesting finds Buzzy. I have never seen one of those harvestmen. All ours seem of the ordinary variety.

buzzy



Joined: 04 Jan 2011
Posts: 3098
Location: In a small wood on the edge of the Huntingdonshire Wolds
PostPosted: Mon Aug 28, 17 5:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Today we visited an old quarry which has been made into a nature reserve.

The first species we homed in on was Autumn Ladies Tresses, which is very uncommon in the area. Most of the flower spikes were well past their best, and since they are quite difficult to photograph, and grow in clusters so it is very hard to see where they all are, I refrained from trying to get a snap today.

We wandered gently around, and saw nice things like Brookweed and Saw Sedge. Not a great deal in the way of invertebrates, though I did find one Common Groundhopper, which hopped off before I could show it to the others.

We found quite a few xquares which had been placed in the hope of attracting reptiles. All we found under them were ants (and one mouse)! Probably too hot today for reptiles.

In the past I have found lots of small Bedeguar Galls on small rose plants close to the ground - today we found this robust one:




Also known as the Robin's Pincushion, and caused by the gall wasp Diplolepis rosae.

Henry

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8732

PostPosted: Tue Aug 29, 17 6:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I have only seen Autumn Ladies Tresses once, and that was at the hotel we stay at in Devon. They had some growing in the lawn. We haven't been there in August recently, so not sure if it is still there.

Those Robins Pincushion galls are rather attractive, even though they are a gall, so probably not ideal for the plant.

Sounds and interesting place.

Slim



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 4657
Location: New England (In the US of A)
PostPosted: Thu Aug 31, 17 11:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Not mine, but a recent video of two Lynx being catty at each other in Maine. Thought it might interest.

https://youtu.be/L4iyPXHM89E

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8732

PostPosted: Fri Sep 01, 17 6:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Interesting Slim. They seemed completely oblivious to the vehicle. Otherwise similar to domestic cats in behaviour, but actually a bit less vocal.

buzzy



Joined: 04 Jan 2011
Posts: 3098
Location: In a small wood on the edge of the Huntingdonshire Wolds
PostPosted: Mon Sep 11, 17 5:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I didn't join the walk last week but today we went to a local site, hoping to dodge the rain showers (which we did), There wasn't a great deal of bird life about, though we did have very good views of two Red Kites.

We did find a large and very active ground beetle, and a slightly smaller but still active female garden spider, but the invertebrate highlight of the day was finding several Willow Emerald Damselflies (Chalcolestes viridis) a recent colonist of Britain and first recorded in our county in 2012. Here is one of the ones we saw:




We also found a fungus which earned from the mycologist an "Ooooooh!" and a "Brilliant find!" - no mean praise! Here is the subject:




the Saffrondrop Bonnet (Mycena crocata) which is supposed to grow on or near Beech but there was no Beech nearby.

Finally we found a spectacular clump of Ivy (Hedera helix) in full flower:




that was attracting large numbers of assorted insects.

Henry

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 32885
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon Sep 11, 17 9:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

nice snaps

round here we have a good selection of the blue and black ones , which makes it a bit tricky to attribute a sp to one flitting past but we don't seem to have any green ones.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8732

PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 17 6:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Nice pictures Henry. We don't get damsel flies as nowhere near water, but I have seen the more common blue ones in some places, although never that one. Our bees are certainly foraging something, so although can't see it because it is in the top of a tree, our ivy could be out too. Pretty little fungus, and one I suspect is thought to be 'uncommon' because most people don't notice it. We have had some magpie inkcap in the wood again, which is supposed to be fairly uncommon.

sgt.colon



Joined: 27 Jul 2009
Posts: 5819
Location: Just south of north.
PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 17 9:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Nice snaps Buzzy. That ivy, the wasps go mental for it around our way, it sounds like there are thousands in there when we walk by.

buzzy



Joined: 04 Jan 2011
Posts: 3098
Location: In a small wood on the edge of the Huntingdonshire Wolds
PostPosted: Tue Sep 19, 17 1:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Yesterday we went to a very local wood. Mainly it was a fungus day, but we did hear (and see occasionally through the tree canopy) some young Buzzards with one or more of their parents. There seemed to be a lot of calling which we interpreted as "Feed me! Feed me!

Amongst the fungi we found quite a lot of Dead Man's Fingers (Xylaria polymorpha)




which I didn't know until yesterday are white underneath the black skin. "A bit like coconut." somebody said. "Smells like coconut, too." said somebody else, but the only person who could detect the coconut smell was the one who uses coconut oil hand cream!

There were also some of these:




the Trooping Crumble Cap (Coprinellus disseminatus).

Henry

sean
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 41682
Location: North Devon
PostPosted: Tue Sep 19, 17 1:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

buzzy wrote:
the Trooping Crumble Cap (Coprinellus disseminatus).

Henry


Brilliant name. I reckon the Queen would be much happier if they changed The Trooping of the Colour to The Trooping of the Crumble.

sgt.colon



Joined: 27 Jul 2009
Posts: 5819
Location: Just south of north.
PostPosted: Tue Sep 19, 17 1:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Great shots again. I've never even heard of dead mans fingers. They are quite funky though.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 32885
Location: yes
PostPosted: Tue Sep 19, 17 2:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

nice snaps, ta for the trouping crumble cap id, i designate all the ones of that sort of form as pixie umbrellas

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8732

PostPosted: Wed Sep 20, 17 6:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Yes, I am inclined to as well Dpack. I don't think I have ever seen the Dead Man's Fingers, but have seen them in the fungus book. We have been looking at fungi recently in the wood with the Volunteers. We have found quite a lot, but not been able to identify very many. The Giant Polyphore has started to come up, and we found some pretty little purple ones, but as they were just starting and hadn't got long enough stems to look at without pulling them up, I don't know which of 3 varieties they were. Nice pictures again Henry.

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